Scouting flooded timber?

Duck Hunting for puddlers like Mallards, Sprig (Pintails), Black ducks, Widgeons, Woodducks, Teal, and other ducks.

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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby noweil » Wed Oct 03, 2012 8:44 pm

I'm not buying into the age theory. The biggest prick I ever ran into waterfowl hunting is retired. Probably late 50's to early 60's. And it was on ground we had hunted for 30 years. You could tell they lacked basic ethics and hunting skills as soon as they got permission to hunt on the property. Their night shooting cooks the roosts in a couple of days.Their sky blasting is just nuts. Never let the birds work. Just blast anything in the sky. They seem to have the landowner fooled. It isnt worth having to fist fight or get in a gun fight with a bunch of jerks who want to come in late and claim it is their spot. A 60 year old man with the rear window of his topper covered with hunting stickers must have a little man complex.

Two years ago we also had a grandfather bring his grandson into a marsh after legal shooting time and set-up 100 yards directly in front of us on the other side of the marsh. When we said something to him, he went off on us. So I took the boat over and offered to give them a ride to our side of the marsh. He decided to walk some place else.

There are plenty of game law violators that are way out of their teens.
CRP was responsible for 25.7 million additional ducks produced in the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region during 1992-2003.  Source DU.
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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby CutEm214 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:10 am

jaker wrote:Everyone on here complaining about "Boom" scouting is lying to themselves. I understand that we all have spots that we feel are "ours". All of us have probly seen spots that no one new about for years suddenly become crowded because of others finding out and talking or maybe even someone you trusted with the spot talking. The fact is it happens and you need to get over it. But, unless you are the kind of guy that hunts one timber hole and has your entire life, then we all have hunted someone else's spots.

Sometimes there is only so much pre-hunt scouting you can do. Lets say you scout an area before the hunt, and come up with a gameplan on how to hunt it, where to sit, etc. But when you hunt it the next day, it turns out that the spot they really wanted to be is where that other group is a few hundred yards away from you.......They kill full limits and you don't hardly fire a shot. Are you goin to learn from that experience and try to be on the x the next day? or are you going to consider it their spot and just watch them murder the birds? Me personally, I'm gonna try to beat them there, If I don't then I will go to another spot, far enough away that we don't interfere with each others hunt. But if I beat them there, then I don't feel bad, they should have got there earlier. However, I will often invite them to join me, circumstances permitting.


jaker - You're missing the point here. Hearing someone in the next hole over tear it up and having your curiosity piqued isn't what we're talking about. This entire debate came about when the OP asked "how to scout flooded timber" and a few guys responded that "boom" scouting was one of the most effective ways to scout. So, again, if trudging to the edge of the marsh/timber/lake/etc and listening intently for where other guys are being successful is a defined tactic in your arsenal...you lack the intelligence and work ethic for this sport. Clear?
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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby jaker » Thu Oct 04, 2012 8:13 am

CutEm214 wrote:
jaker wrote:Everyone on here complaining about "Boom" scouting is lying to themselves. I understand that we all have spots that we feel are "ours". All of us have probly seen spots that no one new about for years suddenly become crowded because of others finding out and talking or maybe even someone you trusted with the spot talking. The fact is it happens and you need to get over it. But, unless you are the kind of guy that hunts one timber hole and has your entire life, then we all have hunted someone else's spots.

Sometimes there is only so much pre-hunt scouting you can do. Lets say you scout an area before the hunt, and come up with a gameplan on how to hunt it, where to sit, etc. But when you hunt it the next day, it turns out that the spot they really wanted to be is where that other group is a few hundred yards away from you.......They kill full limits and you don't hardly fire a shot. Are you goin to learn from that experience and try to be on the x the next day? or are you going to consider it their spot and just watch them murder the birds? Me personally, I'm gonna try to beat them there, If I don't then I will go to another spot, far enough away that we don't interfere with each others hunt. But if I beat them there, then I don't feel bad, they should have got there earlier. However, I will often invite them to join me, circumstances permitting.


jaker - You're missing the point here. Hearing someone in the next hole over tear it up and having your curiosity piqued isn't what we're talking about. This entire debate came about when the OP asked "how to scout flooded timber" and a few guys responded that "boom" scouting was one of the most effective ways to scout. So, again, if trudging to the edge of the marsh/timber/lake/etc and listening intently for where other guys are being successful is a defined tactic in your arsenal...you lack the intelligence and work ethic for this sport. Clear?


well, I would agree with this post for the most part. There are really too many variables to set a hard rule for it. But for the most part, I would agree if someone chooses not to scout at all, and simply adjusts based on shooting opening day, then they are pretty lazy. Although I can see someone being from out of town, and trying to figure out an area mid season. It would be foolish to ignore where the shooting was coming from.

In my mind, it all boils down to RESPECT......As long as others show respect for me, show a little common sense, most of the time there would be no problems. Its the guys that come running 30minutes after shooting light, because you have been tearing them up, and then sit there and shoot your swing birds, or the ones that think they can hit anything no matter how far, if they throw up enough steel.
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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby dmadden7070 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:14 am

In my mind, it all boils down to RESPECT......As long as others show respect for me, show a little common sense, most of the time there would be no problems.

I completely agree with this statement. I truly believe you can "boom scout" without being disrespectful. For example, if you hear people shooting down the river or across the marsh it's as easy as asking. Catch them at the boat ramp and make conversation. Ask if they'll be hunting that spot the next day or the next time you'll be hunting. If so wish them luck and don't be a tool. You can try to beat them there... but honestly, after talking to someone I would have a hard time actually doing that. When you realize it's another person just like you, you want them to do well. Respect and common sense.
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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby dmadden7070 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:15 am

sorry didn't get the quotes on that part right. It was from the comment right above. not my words in the beginning.
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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby Drakenstien » Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:24 pm

JON wrote:We use helicopters.


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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby Trent_Rivers » Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:55 am

I don't see how "boom" scouting is the lowest form of ethics. Here's my big question when might I scout other than while hunting? Besides a split you can hardly do any scouting because there are people all over and you can't run around finding holes till very late in the day (you have to be out of the woods by 1). Shooting means ducks... I'm no private investigator but if I'm trying to kill a few I will not ignore the endless shooting. To all those who think every hunter should know where the x is... I agree scouting is imperative, but for me to completely ignore all that shooting I think would be ignorant. Is it the ideal method of scouting? No but it is a good way to get in the right area for next time.
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Re: Scouting flooded timber?

Postby Trent_Rivers » Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:58 am

On a more productive side I find it useful to get near the local rest area and watch ducks fly off there and follow them in the timber chances are though, most of the ducks you see leaving will be headed towards the meat of the shooting. But getting some open airspace can help determine where they wanna be.
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