2nd shot from O/U failure

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2nd shot from O/U failure

Postby vacuum6 » Thu Nov 08, 2012 6:00 pm

I have been shooting a 20 gauge O/U that has just started to fail firing the 2nd shot. the inertia from the first shot is what cocks the shotgun for the 2nd shot. it is not consistent...sometimes I will get a 2nd shot...sometimes not. if, after the first shot, I bump the stock on the ground,,,,then the second pipe will get cocked. this is an older Miroku from 1969...built in the same factory as the citoris. looks to be almost identical to my 12 gauge citori. I am wondering if the springs or something internally is just getting tired...or ? I do have a limbsaver pad on the gun...which may have something to do with this??/ it does not matter if I am shooting 2 3/4" or 3". I clean the gun, but I have not taken the stock off to see if there is some dirt inside someplace. If I had a broken spring (they are band type springs-not coil), would the 2nd pipe cock at all?? I have had this O/U for decades...this is someting new to me. when I store this gun...and the citori...I use snap caps...so after I dry fire the first pipe, I have to bump the stock on the floor to cock and dry fire the second pipe(with snap caps of course). so, I do not store these weapons with the springs cocked all off season....I assume this is normal procedure. Anyone had these things completely apart? anyone have any ideas ?
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Re: 2nd shot from O/U failure

Postby StevenL » Fri Nov 09, 2012 12:01 am

A 1969 vintage, in my opinion, suggests the probability of necessary and thorough cleaning before thoughts of tired or worn out main springs would be the cause of the malfunction you have detailed. The shotgun you speak of is fully cocked when its operator closes the breach. It is a single trigger mechanism with an actuator switch to select which barrel (upper or lower) fires first. Quite often, especially if the actuator switch mechanism is dirty or out of sync because it is dirty, one operator or another may experience the same sort of problem.
Remove the butt to expose the trigger group. Use a vacuum cleaner with hose to remove any loose debris from the machined wood of the butt and any debris (wood chips etc.) that may have taken residence inside the shotgun’s trigger group area. Clean all metal with a soft bristle brush (tooth brush, small paint brush, shaving lather brush, etc.). Wipe off all grease and crud wherever with Q-tips, pipe cleaners or toothpicks. Sparingly apply your favorite low viscosity oil used for things like sewing machines and hair clippers to pivot points and contact faces –no penetrating oils or dry lubes- then wipe away any excess with Q-tips. A light film is good everywhere but dripping anywhere is no good. Load snap caps in each chamber and close the breach. Set the actuator to fire the barrel of your choice. Squeeze the trigger, being careful to avoid touching any of the moving parts inside the now visible mechanism and watch what happens inside. Inertia, as a result of recoil after firing one barrel or the other does not cock the shotgun but it does set the trigger for the remaining barrel even in a dry-fire exercise, i.e., if all the clockwork inside is clean. If the trigger actuator is out of sync, you can remedy that too by selecting a different barrel after opening and closing the action again, then pulling the trigger twice to make it happen. Watch what the trigger actuator does when you move it. What else moves when you operate the actuator switch? Look at and learn the inner works of your shotgun. But never venture beyond the realm of your own mechanical aptitude or the availability of proper tools for the job. It isn’t a Swiss watch but if you treat it as such you sure won’t hurt anything.
On the butt -the parts on the inside that were machine cut- lightly sand with 320-400 grit paper any sharp corners and furry looking areas. Then, copiously apply fine Furniture oil to any parts of the inside of the butt that didn’t receive the same treatment as the wood on the outside and allow it to soak in.
Re-assemble the shotgun when you’ve decided it’s time, or can’t wait any longer.
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Re: 2nd shot from O/U failure

Postby vacuum6 » Fri Nov 09, 2012 5:34 am

thank you ...exactly the feedback I was looking for. there are no gunsmiths near me that know what you just relayed. Most of them don't know the connection between Browning, Miroku, and Charles Daly O/U's. My selective barrel feature has never worked. I always assumed it was one of the features that charles daly omitted to avoid the browning patent infringement issues.....there is NO side to side movement of the barrel selector/safety on this miroku...never has been. I will pull the stock off and take a peek.....if it looks like way too many tiny parts...then I may have to find a smith with more ability than myself. I have problems with tiny pieces and springs that go flying upon dissassembly...before I can memorize their position. my weapon also does not have operational auto ejectors. I assumed that this was another one of the patent infringement features that was omitted. I definitely prefer to be without that feature anyway...hopefully, a good cleaning will make things fully operational...I like this shotgun. thank you again.
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Re: 2nd shot from O/U failure

Postby dakotashooter2 » Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:24 pm

Before going to the gunsmith do a little shooting to make sure it is not the pad or shooter error. Often if the butt is not pulled tight to the shoulder it may also do what you described and it's not hard for that to happen particularly if the LOP is a bit off for you. I'd take the pad off and shoot a dozen rounds making a concious effort to keep the butt tight to your shoulder. If all goes well put the pad back on and do the same. If there is still trouble go see the smith. It also may be a combo of something dirty or worn and poor gun mounting.
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Re: 2nd shot from O/U failure

Postby StevenL » Sun Nov 11, 2012 9:31 am

Here's a link that's very informative along with part numbers and pictures:

http://www.wisnersinc.com/additional_in ... rings.html
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Re: 2nd shot from O/U failure

Postby vacuum6 » Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:22 pm

I had printed this off several years ago...but being still confused, I called wisners. My serial numbers, etc....do not clearly identify which parts I would need for backup....unless I took apart my shotgun. I seriously doubt I could get it all back together...or even tell if I had the correct parts. I chickened out . I wanted to send it to them and have it cleaned and gone through...but they said they no longer do any gunsmithing work. When I find someone who I would trust to take mine apart, I will take some pics and send them to wisners to see if they can fill in the numerous voids that exist on their web site...I can't figure out the whole serial number and type 1,2,3,4 thing???
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