Cold Blue, Hot Blue, or Parkerizing?

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Cold Blue, Hot Blue, or Parkerizing?

Postby duckdiesel » Tue May 27, 2008 11:51 am

I've been working on my father's 1100 (see post below) and I've made it operable after tearing the firearm down and giving it a good clean up... the stock and forearm are in the plans but I'm more interested in doing my own metal work and have had some good input on the other thread, but after researching it would seem better for me to send the gun to a company to do hot bluing or parkerizing... all the research I've done seems to look at cold bluing as "ineffective"... I don't believe that but wanted to ask anybody there experiences with cold blue, the type they used, the problems, successes, and suggestions... Right now I want to do this all myself, but want to do it properly.

I haven't been looking, but can parkerizing be done at room temperature? I have also been notified that warming the metal helps with the cold blue process. It seems the more I research the more I spin...

Any help would be appreciated..

DD out

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after some quick research...

Postby duckdiesel » Tue May 27, 2008 12:17 pm

it looks as if the parkerizing is done much like the hot blue, so I'm back to the cold blue system and whether it can be done well... For those of you who have already posted or would like to respond do you have photos of your own work, plus does a sticky exist on how to cold blue a gun? Ned S., if there doesn't exist any, I will nominate you for the job...

DD out
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Postby Ned S » Fri Jul 04, 2008 6:07 pm

It can be done well, Just use Brownell's Oxpho Blue. Clean the metal parts with a good solvent then scrub with a scouring powder. Turn up your water heater. Wash off the scouring powder with very hot water. The hot water will warm the metal parts and cause it to dry fast. Do not wipe but let it air dry. After applying the first coat of Oxpho light rub with 0000 steel wool. Do this seven times and the last time rub out with linseed oil and an old wash cloth. This gives an excellent finish. Refinish the wood with Tung Oil or Tung Oil Varnish. Also seven coats rubbing out with steel wool after it drys. Make sure it drys before rubbing out. Tung Oil is more water resistant than Tru Oil which is a polermerized linsead oil(boiled under vacuum). Ned S
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Postby waterfowlhunter » Sat Jul 05, 2008 7:41 am

Are you set on blueing?

I have refinished several guns with the brownells gun coat and with Midway usa's cermacoat.

It is a bake on finish and it is very durable. It comes in several shades and colors and with the cermacoat you do not even have to remove the old finish (but media blasting is recommended). the nice thing here is that you can blast the parts and remove any tiny rust spots too.

this is 2 of the ones I have done. YOU HAVE TO FOLLOW THE DIRESTIONS EXACTLY. I can give you some tips if you go this route.

the 11-87 was put in a case wet and left there for a couple of years by the owner. it was rusted to the case and I had to sand blast it using aluminum oxide to get it cleaned up enough to finish. and it is VERY DURABLE. I have seen pocket carry guns that show little signs of ware after being coated with this stuff and being carried every day for years.

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Postby waterfowlhunter » Sat Jul 05, 2008 7:45 am

forgot to mention the the bolt on the 1187 was also painted and you can see it is holding up great too. It was the polished mirror finished bolt before I had to refinish it. I also had to replace the stocks as this was a high gloss premier and I made it dear blind friendly. The barrel was a 28" but the rust on the end was so bad that the choke fell out the side. I cut it to 21" and will thread it for rem chokes when I have time.
"A free people ought to be armed" George Washington 1790

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Postby RightWing » Sat Jul 05, 2008 9:16 am

waterfowlhunter wrote:forgot to mention the the bolt on the 1187 was also painted and you can see it is holding up great too. It was the polished mirror finished bolt before I had to refinish it. I also had to replace the stocks as this was a high gloss premier and I made it dear blind friendly. The barrel was a 28" but the rust on the end was so bad that the choke fell out the side. I cut it to 21" and will thread it for rem chokes when I have time.


Wow....great job.......any interest in doing an old Mossberg pump for me in that green? I can send it and pay up front.
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