Barocky Road...

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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby blackduckdog2 » Sat Aug 31, 2013 10:15 am

ScaupHunter wrote:The one adult definitely looked like it was being protective of the juvenile cygnet.

That's what I thought too, but the weird thing is that the juvenile didn't really look like a juvenile (you know how the juvies are pretty gray that time of year?) This one had perfect adult coloration; it was just smaller. Like it had bad genes or something, or maybe there are smaller subspecies like duskies and cacklers among honkers. I think I'll check it out
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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby SpinnerMan » Sat Aug 31, 2013 11:30 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:
ScaupHunter wrote:The one adult definitely looked like it was being protective of the juvenile cygnet.

That's what I thought too, but the weird thing is that the juvenile didn't really look like a juvenile (you know how the juvies are pretty gray that time of year?) This one had perfect adult coloration; it was just smaller. Like it had bad genes or something, or maybe there are smaller subspecies like duskies and cacklers among honkers. I think I'll check it out

We have a lot of mute swans around here. By a lot, I have seen 5 pairs with a combined total of 15 cygnets in the last week or so. The young from the first hatch are almost fully white. One pair had their nest flooded out and they renested, which I didn't know swans did that, and those are still very ugly and very gray.

By whistlers, do you mean trumpeter swans? I've never seen one for sure. We had a tundra swan mixed in with about 20 mute swans last winter. My wife and I were looking at the birds with a spotting scope and I noticed one was not a mute and got excited. I was disappointed when it turned out to be a tundra swan. I've seen tons of them in PA. I actually called one into my goose decoys once.

I think I should start my life list of birds. I actually sort of have that for birds that have showed up to eat from my window sill at work. That's up to 25 species of birds and 4 species of mammals and the cooper's hawk that I used to see on occasion try to eat birds eating my bird feed but I ruled it doesn't count because I never was able to confirm that he ate one or landed on the window sill. While I counted the pair of Canadas that would come and eat the seed the fell on the ground. Hey, you got to have rules even for silly things like that. It makes it more fun.
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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby blackduckdog2 » Sat Aug 31, 2013 5:20 pm

SpinnerMan wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:
ScaupHunter wrote:The one adult definitely looked like it was being protective of the juvenile cygnet.

That's what I thought too, but the weird thing is that the juvenile didn't really look like a juvenile (you know how the juvies are pretty gray that time of year?) This one had perfect adult coloration; it was just smaller. Like it had bad genes or something, or maybe there are smaller subspecies like duskies and cacklers among honkers. I think I'll check it out

We have a lot of mute swans around here. By a lot, I have seen 5 pairs with a combined total of 15 cygnets in the last week or so. The young from the first hatch are almost fully white. One pair had their nest flooded out and they renested, which I didn't know swans did that, and those are still very ugly and very gray.

By whistlers, do you mean trumpeter swans? I've never seen one for sure. We had a tundra swan mixed in with about 20 mute swans last winter. My wife and I were looking at the birds with a spotting scope and I noticed one was not a mute and got excited. I was disappointed when it turned out to be a tundra swan. I've seen tons of them in PA. I actually called one into my goose decoys once.

I think I should start my life list of birds. I actually sort of have that for birds that have showed up to eat from my window sill at work. That's up to 25 species of birds and 4 species of mammals and the cooper's hawk that I used to see on occasion try to eat birds eating my bird feed but I ruled it doesn't count because I never was able to confirm that he ate one or landed on the window sill. While I counted the pair of Canadas that would come and eat the seed the fell on the ground. Hey, you got to have rules even for silly things like that. It makes it more fun.

Right, I think whistlers are a subspecies of trumpeters but I didn't look it up and my Audobon days are well in the rear view mirror. But I think that's right. We get a few mutes from time to time and I always wanna pop 'em because they compete with our native swans (I feel the same way about starlings, pigeons, house sparrows and other assorted avian Euro-trash. Pheasants not so much, but they're from China0 Didn't Maryland have a control hunt for mute swans a decade or so back, in order to free up habitat for for tundra swans, which were trying to get back in? I thought I heard something like that and it turned into a PR nightmare for their Fish& Wildlife guys because they somewhat cluelessly scheduled the hunt to coincide with Valentine's Day weekend and the press splashed it all over the front pages. Hell, I'd love to shoot one, but you gotta run those control hunts almost on the QT, or else run a big educational campaign first.
I've got an aversion to life lists, but I think that's because of the folks I've known who've kept them. The more I think about it though, it seems like a bird hunter might actually be the only ones whose life lists wouldn't be annoying (mainly because they'd have some actual interest in the bird, as opposed to just a cursory ID and a checkmark) I once went out to the Olympic Peninsula with a really serious Audobon chick, and after we fought traffic to get close enough to the Great Gray owl (it was well advertised), she got a look through her binocs, turned us around, and back to town we went. What's the frigging point?
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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby cartervj » Sun Sep 01, 2013 7:53 am

http://www.josephromans.com/Wildlife/Wading-Birds/11430066_LFkdjW#!i=2382339573&k=bcdM2fh

these hung out for a few weeks, my friend and his wife got lot's of pics
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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby SpinnerMan » Sun Sep 01, 2013 9:36 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:Didn't Maryland have a control hunt for mute swans a decade or so back, in order to free up habitat for for tundra swans, which were trying to get back in?
You can hunt Mute Swans in PA now. We definitely need to be able to hunt them here.

From their regs
Mute Swans:
Mute swans are non-native and not protected under state or federal law. Hunters may harvest mute swans and they do not count
as part of the daily bag. Mute swans have an orange bill with a black fleshy knob on top at the feather line. Mute swans do not
feed in fields and are only encountered in wetlands.
Note: Native tundra and trumpeter swans are protected, have a black bill and are commonly found in fields and wetlands.
Sandhill Cranes are likely to be present in certain areas and are protected.


A good read on what happened including the Maryland lawsuit and what has happened since.
http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=623106&mode=2

blackduckdog2 wrote:I've got an aversion to life lists
As a guide as opposed to an obsession, I like them. Going to all 50 states is a minor "life list" of mine. Alaska, Hawaii, North Dakota, South Dakota, Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire and I'm there. Next summer we will look into vacation in Maine and hit New Hampshire and Vermont while in the region. Why not? Never been and may fall in love with the region or may just check a meaningless box on a life list. Hunting and fishing, I like to get different species far more than I care about numbers. In addition to the window sill bird watching list, since moving to Illinois I have taken 22 species of animals and caught 34 species of freshwater fish. Teal season starts in a week and it's a little extra motivation to get out and try to add a BWT to the list. Also, no divers on the list, so I plan to take a few vacation days and hit the public blinds on the river and see if I can add another species or two. Also started talking with my regular snow goose hunting partner about a duck hunting trip somewhere and the one thing we agree is anything but mallards. I'd like it to be something with a good chance of a new species, but anything with a good chance of diversity even if it is birds I have got, but don't get regularly. This is how I think life lists add value to your life. They get you thinking and add a little extra "goal" to your recreation.
A politician thinks of the next election; a statesman of the next generation. A politician looks for the success of his party; a statesman for that of the country. The statesman wished to steer, while the politician was satisfied to drift.
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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby beretta24 » Sun Sep 01, 2013 10:40 am

Spinner, you and your buddy should hit north or south Dakota. Great species diversity and you can cross em off. ND diver hunting is overlooked in a major way by most. I've shot pretty much everything but a woodduck there.
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Re: Barocky Road...

Postby SpinnerMan » Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:46 am

beretta24 wrote:Spinner, you and your buddy should hit north or south Dakota. Great species diversity and you can cross em off. ND diver hunting is overlooked in a major way by most. I've shot pretty much everything but a woodduck there.

That's definitely a possibility. I had absolutely planned on doing just that, but my dog has had all kinds of problems and just when she was hitting her stride to do that she tore an ACL, just about recovered, tore the other, and since then she has had other problems and never recovered and now is getting old, so that plan has gone out the window. I felt like a cubs fan, maybe next year.

I also know that diver hunting can be good as well and was not going to be neglected in the considerations. I just expected that my dog would be going with, but it just didn't work out. Two or three times I thought I was a year away.
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