Christianity and the Death Penalty

A forum not related to waterfowl for discussing the more controversial and hot topic issues in our world from immigration, politics, the war, etc..

Moderators: Smackaduck, MM

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby cartervj » Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:56 pm

Glimmerjim wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
Glimmerjim wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
Glimmerjim wrote:
cartervj wrote: The difference is, conservatives take up for the victim and exacting punishment, liberals take up for the assailant, wanting to somehow fix them.

Sorry carter, far too over-simplistic. To simply and succinctly make my point, I would paraphrase your statement as "conservatives want to exact punishment on wrong-doers until time immemorial. Liberals want to find the source of wrong-doing in humanity and attempt to correct it."

:lol3: :lol3: :lol3: i.e. UTOPIA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: :lol3:

Sorry, Inda. Completely inane response. But the humor you see in your inanity is slightly amusing. :thumbsup:

So you do not see the Absurdity in attempting, "finding the source of wrong-doing in humanity"? :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: that's even funnier!!! :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: :lol3:

Gimme a break…. the Christian right is OBSESSED with perfecting the proclivities of mankind.They just have to project the desire onto a deity figure in order to get on board. No difference WHATSOEVER!!

Yeah know, BDD2. I truly believe, all due respect intended, that we went over their heads a LONG time ago in this conversation. We're now attempting to get sheep to understand calculus. We'd all be more content to toss a couple of flakes of alfafa into the bin and retire to our offices for a Johnnie Walker black with two ice cubes and a suggestion of a splash of water. :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: :beer:


that's like saying Jimmy Carter and Obama are the 2 greatest Presidents. :lol3: :lol3: :lol3:

You just think you're ahead of the conversation :tongue:

I have groceries to bring in now. :beer:
“Nothing makes me more certain of the victory of our ideas than our success in the universities” – Adolf H, 1930
User avatar
cartervj
hunter
 
Posts: 7299
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 3:01 pm
Location: NW AL


Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby cartervj » Tue Dec 03, 2013 8:23 pm

Glimmerjim wrote:
cartervj wrote: The difference is, conservatives take up for the victim and exacting punishment, liberals take up for the assailant, wanting to somehow fix them.

Sorry carter, far too over-simplistic. To simply and succinctly make my point, I would paraphrase your statement as "conservatives want to exact punishment on wrong-doers until time immemorial. Liberals want to find the source of wrong-doing in humanity and attempt to correct it."



Free Will or Government controlled, you tell me?

I think the word you are missing is, accountability. Whether mooching or purposefully killing someone is a detriment to society now isn't it.
“Nothing makes me more certain of the victory of our ideas than our success in the universities” – Adolf H, 1930
User avatar
cartervj
hunter
 
Posts: 7299
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 3:01 pm
Location: NW AL

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby SpinnerMan » Tue Dec 03, 2013 9:26 pm

Glimmerjim wrote:Liberals want to find the source of wrong-doing in humanity and attempt to correct it."
Best of luck with that, but until then, let's go with what is proven to work :thumbsup:

This probably explains why liberals rule over the most crime ridden neighborhoods. They are looking for fantasy and not doing what is practical.
A politician thinks of the next election; a statesman of the next generation. A politician looks for the success of his party; a statesman for that of the country. The statesman wished to steer, while the politician was satisfied to drift.
User avatar
SpinnerMan
hunter
 
Posts: 16053
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:24 am
Location: Joliet, IL

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby MODuckkiller » Wed Dec 04, 2013 10:55 am

Eye for an eye.

...Did I miss something?
MIZ
-MODuckkiller
User avatar
MODuckkiller
hunter
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:54 am
Location: Missouri, Louisiana

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby SpinnerMan » Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:24 am

MODuckkiller wrote:Eye of the guilty for an eye he took from the innocent.

...Did I miss something?

FIFY.

Otherwise, in typical silly liberal fashion, they will trot out the nonsense that sounds good to them, but is totally wrong.

Of course, if you think in groups and not base it on individuals, then of course, the world turns into the Hatfields and McCoys and when Trayvon Barack McCoy is putting the beat down on George Bush Hatfield, retribution is due from every Hatfield and every McCoy and it matters not the facts of this specific incident, the McCoys believe the Hatfield deserved and the Hatfield believe the McCoy deserved it and neither has any rights, they are born guilty and the world is already blind.
A politician thinks of the next election; a statesman of the next generation. A politician looks for the success of his party; a statesman for that of the country. The statesman wished to steer, while the politician was satisfied to drift.
User avatar
SpinnerMan
hunter
 
Posts: 16053
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:24 am
Location: Joliet, IL

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby MODuckkiller » Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:35 am

SpinnerMan wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:Eye of the guilty for an eye he took from the innocent.

...Did I miss something?

FIFY.

Otherwise, in typical silly liberal fashion, they will trot out the nonsense that sounds good to them, but is totally wrong.

Of course, if you think in groups and not base it on individuals, then of course, the world turns into the Hatfields and McCoys and when Trayvon Barack McCoy is putting the beat down on George Bush Hatfield, retribution is due from every Hatfield and every McCoy and it matters not the facts of this specific incident, the McCoys believe the Hatfield deserved and the Hatfield believe the McCoy deserved it and neither has any rights, they are born guilty and the world is already blind.

I won't lie to you, I didn't follow that. Not because I don't have the mental capacity to, but mainly by choice. Personally I don't see a gray area that I believe you are referring to. Could be wrong.

I stand by my original statement: eye for an eye. It's that simple. Certain circumstances may arise, like accidental manslaughter, but otherwise murder is murder. If found guilty by an impartial jury, string them up and I won't bat an eye. My opinion.
MIZ
-MODuckkiller
User avatar
MODuckkiller
hunter
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:54 am
Location: Missouri, Louisiana

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby SpinnerMan » Wed Dec 04, 2013 1:12 pm

MODuckkiller wrote:
SpinnerMan wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:Eye of the guilty for an eye he took from the innocent.

...Did I miss something?

FIFY.

Otherwise, in typical silly liberal fashion, they will trot out the nonsense that sounds good to them, but is totally wrong.

Of course, if you think in groups and not base it on individuals, then of course, the world turns into the Hatfields and McCoys and when Trayvon Barack McCoy is putting the beat down on George Bush Hatfield, retribution is due from every Hatfield and every McCoy and it matters not the facts of this specific incident, the McCoys believe the Hatfield deserved and the Hatfield believe the McCoy deserved it and neither has any rights, they are born guilty and the world is already blind.

I won't lie to you, I didn't follow that. Not because I don't have the mental capacity to, but mainly by choice. Personally I don't see a gray area that I believe you are referring to. Could be wrong.

I stand by my original statement: eye for an eye. It's that simple. Certain circumstances may arise, like accidental manslaughter, but otherwise murder is murder. If found guilty by an impartial jury, string them up and I won't bat an eye. My opinion.

There is that silly saying that an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. Only if the eye in retribution is not taking from the eye of the person that is guilty, but from an innocent person and then that innocent person takes his eye in retribution from another innocent person and so forth.

Unless I missed it, I was really surprised that that silly statement didn't pop up the first time and eye for an eye was mentioned.

It clearly comes from people that don't think. I was going to add on to that, but they just don't think, period.
A politician thinks of the next election; a statesman of the next generation. A politician looks for the success of his party; a statesman for that of the country. The statesman wished to steer, while the politician was satisfied to drift.
User avatar
SpinnerMan
hunter
 
Posts: 16053
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:24 am
Location: Joliet, IL

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Wed Dec 04, 2013 5:53 pm

Right.... We should take seven times seventy eyes, like Jesus said
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby MODuckkiller » Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:03 pm

SpinnerMan wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:
SpinnerMan wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:Eye of the guilty for an eye he took from the innocent.

...Did I miss something?

FIFY.

Otherwise, in typical silly liberal fashion, they will trot out the nonsense that sounds good to them, but is totally wrong.

Of course, if you think in groups and not base it on individuals, then of course, the world turns into the Hatfields and McCoys and when Trayvon Barack McCoy is putting the beat down on George Bush Hatfield, retribution is due from every Hatfield and every McCoy and it matters not the facts of this specific incident, the McCoys believe the Hatfield deserved and the Hatfield believe the McCoy deserved it and neither has any rights, they are born guilty and the world is already blind.

I won't lie to you, I didn't follow that. Not because I don't have the mental capacity to, but mainly by choice. Personally I don't see a gray area that I believe you are referring to. Could be wrong.

I stand by my original statement: eye for an eye. It's that simple. Certain circumstances may arise, like accidental manslaughter, but otherwise murder is murder. If found guilty by an impartial jury, string them up and I won't bat an eye. My opinion.

There is that silly saying that an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. Only if the eye in retribution is not taking from the eye of the person that is guilty, but from an innocent person and then that innocent person takes his eye in retribution from another innocent person and so forth.

Unless I missed it, I was really surprised that that silly statement didn't pop up the first time and eye for an eye was mentioned.

It clearly comes from people that don't think. I was going to add on to that, but they just don't think, period.

MIZ
-MODuckkiller
User avatar
MODuckkiller
hunter
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:54 am
Location: Missouri, Louisiana

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby MODuckkiller » Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:05 pm

blackduckdog2 wrote:Right.... We should take seven times seventy eyes, like Jesus said

If there are 70 times 70 tried and found guilty killers, then those 70 times 70 should be killed. That's literally how it's interpreted. Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth. I don't see how this is eluding you people.
MIZ
-MODuckkiller
User avatar
MODuckkiller
hunter
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:54 am
Location: Missouri, Louisiana

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby assateague » Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:34 pm

blackduckdog2 wrote:Right.... We should take seven times seventy eyes, like Jesus said




So in your mind, forgiveness precludes punishment?
WOLVERINES

Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Let a man vote to give himself a fish and he eats until society collapses.
User avatar
assateague
Emu hunter extraordinaire
 
Posts: 21277
Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Eastern Shore, People's Republic of Maryland

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:02 pm

MODuckkiller wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:Right.... We should take seven times seventy eyes, like Jesus said

If there are 70 times 70 tried and found guilty killers, then those 70 times 70 should be killed. That's literally how it's interpreted. Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth. I don't see how this is eluding you people.

When Christians start talking an eye for an eye, I know we're not going to have an intelligent discussion
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby MODuckkiller » Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:16 pm

blackduckdog2 wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:Right.... We should take seven times seventy eyes, like Jesus said

If there are 70 times 70 tried and found guilty killers, then those 70 times 70 should be killed. That's literally how it's interpreted. Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth. I don't see how this is eluding you people.

When Christians start talking an eye for an eye, I know we're not going to have an intelligent discussion

So now my faith has come into question...
MIZ
-MODuckkiller
User avatar
MODuckkiller
hunter
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:54 am
Location: Missouri, Louisiana

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Wed Dec 04, 2013 9:33 pm

I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby MODuckkiller » Wed Dec 04, 2013 9:45 pm

blackduckdog2 wrote:I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time

I do apologize. I realize that the use of this specific verse was not meant to be taken literally, and in Matthew Jesus goes on to contradict the command, and talk on how the command has been misused and misunderstood.

I just however believe that it is the best way to handle first degree murder. My personal belief, my opinion-I'm entitled to that.

Surely you, of all people, understand the right to believe something a little radical. :hammer:
MIZ
-MODuckkiller
User avatar
MODuckkiller
hunter
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:54 am
Location: Missouri, Louisiana

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby assateague » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:11 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time



I'll ask again- in your mind, does forgiveness preclude punishment? Simple yes or no question.
WOLVERINES

Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Let a man vote to give himself a fish and he eats until society collapses.
User avatar
assateague
Emu hunter extraordinaire
 
Posts: 21277
Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Eastern Shore, People's Republic of Maryland

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:23 am

assateague wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time



I'll ask again- in your mind, does forgiveness preclude punishment? Simple yes or no question.

You mean are they mutually exclusive?
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:24 am

MODuckkiller wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time

I do apologize. I realize that the use of this specific verse was not meant to be taken literally, and in Matthew Jesus goes on to contradict the command, and talk on how the command has been misused and misunderstood.

I just however believe that it is the best way to handle first degree murder. My personal belief, my opinion-I'm entitled to that.

Surely you, of all people, understand the right to believe something a little radical. :hammer:

Jesus was a radical, for sure………..me, I'm pretty milquetoast :lol3:
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby assateague » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:45 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:
assateague wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time



I'll ask again- in your mind, does forgiveness preclude punishment? Simple yes or no question.

You mean are they mutually exclusive?


Yes. If you forgive someone, does that mean that they cannot be punished for the action(s)?
WOLVERINES

Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Let a man vote to give himself a fish and he eats until society collapses.
User avatar
assateague
Emu hunter extraordinaire
 
Posts: 21277
Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Eastern Shore, People's Republic of Maryland

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:20 am

assateague wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:
assateague wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:I'm not sure what faith has to do with it, Moduck. It's just you took one of the most poignant passages I've ever read anywhere on forgiveness and turned it into an accounting of mass executions. I'm not often shocked in here, but you got me this time



I'll ask again- in your mind, does forgiveness preclude punishment? Simple yes or no question.

You mean are they mutually exclusive?


Yes. If you forgive someone, does that mean that they cannot be punished for the action(s)?

Of course not….as any parent knows. But this particular parable functions somewhat differently, if you'll recall. Jesus uses the forgiveness of debt as his allegory, and there is no punishment involved. (except perhaps for the servant who refused to forgive another's debt after the master of the house had forgiven HIS)
I take your point, AT……..but it's telling that whenever the subject of capital punishment comes up on this board, forgiveness is not exactly foremost on the minds of most commenters, is it? And you don't have to read too far between the lines to pick up on the palpable overtones of vengeance. Most of what Jesus had to say on the matter of punishment amounted to a judicious warning against the very real spiritual perils of judgment and vengeance. He didn't subvert the law (well, I guess he did when he let the woman go unstoned), but he showed how dangerous a predicament it presented to us, as a society.
So, to your original point, yeah…….. forgiveness is a very crucial component here, since we not only need to defend ourselves and our community from the ravages of antisocial evildoers, but we need to defend ourselves against the corrosive effects of the awful power and elevated position we assume when we take on the very necessary role of punisher.
That answer your question?
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby SpinnerMan » Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:41 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:it's telling that whenever the subject of capital punishment comes up on this board, forgiveness is not exactly foremost on the minds of most commenters, is it?

Gee, when the subject is punishment people don't talk about the subject of forgiveness :fingerhead:

blackduckdog2 wrote:And you don't have to read too far between the lines to pick up on the palpable overtones of vengeance.
We are talking about the appropriate punish for someone that has made the decision to murder someone and carried it out and you want to change the subject :huh:

blackduckdog2 wrote:Most of what Jesus had to say on the matter of punishment amounted to a judicious warning against the very real spiritual perils of judgment and vengeance.
Be rational and not emotional. No lynch mobs. So yes, there is no role in determining punishment the motive of seeking revenge. I think what you see as vengeance is proportionality. The punishment must fit the crime. Adulterers should not receive capital punishment via a lynch mob. That doesn't mean that premeditated murderers should not be punished harshly.

blackduckdog2 wrote:He didn't subvert the law (well, I guess he did when he let the woman go unstoned), but he showed how dangerous a predicament it presented to us, as a society.
He did not force anyone to do anything. He reasoned with them. Notice her crime. It was not like she raped and murdered a child. She committed a serious moral failing which government should not be involved in as opposed to a heinous crime where the government must.

blackduckdog2 wrote:forgiveness is a very crucial component here
I cannot forgive you when you have wronged your wife. Forgiveness is purely between those that have been wronged and those that wronged them. Government is a disinterested third party carrying out the laws of which punishment is part of the law. Forgiveness is often crucial to the well-being of the wronged if they will continue to have a relationship. It is not a requirement for those that will not have an ongoing relationship. Forgiveness must be sincerely asked for and I believe there is no crime that God will not forgive if sincerely asked for. Given that we are humans, we cannot as easily tell when it is sincere nor so easily forgive if it is.

Forgiveness has nothing to do with the criminal justice system. Flexibility for judgment to improve effectiveness, but that is not forgiveness in this context. Forgiveness is between the wronged and those that wronged them and for obvious reasons they are excluded from being decision makers in the process which must be disinterested third parties.
A politician thinks of the next election; a statesman of the next generation. A politician looks for the success of his party; a statesman for that of the country. The statesman wished to steer, while the politician was satisfied to drift.
User avatar
SpinnerMan
hunter
 
Posts: 16053
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:24 am
Location: Joliet, IL

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Thu Dec 05, 2013 12:43 pm

You're flat out wrong, Spinner……….if we as a society are going to take on the role of punisher (as we must) then we fall prey to all the attendant psychological and spiritual pitfalls that placing oneself in such a position of power and superiority entails. And forgiveness is likely the only way out of that, especially on a community wide basis. Otherwise, that lynch mob mentality you inveighed against is just a heartbeat away (I'd say it's already there, to tell the truth……….just look at the reaction of people outside the prison walls during an execution)
If I have to kill them, I'll kill them (remember, though, that I'm the only one I'm trusting with the power to do so) But if I gotta be hangman, I'm at least gonna be aware of the dangers involved)
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby assateague » Thu Dec 05, 2013 12:57 pm

I forgive as much as possible. However, that certainly doesn't mean someone cannot be punished for their actions. Nor is punishment "vengeance".
WOLVERINES

Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Let a man vote to give himself a fish and he eats until society collapses.
User avatar
assateague
Emu hunter extraordinaire
 
Posts: 21277
Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Eastern Shore, People's Republic of Maryland

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby SpinnerMan » Thu Dec 05, 2013 1:22 pm

blackduckdog2 wrote:if we as a society are going to take on the role of punisher (as we must) then we fall prey to all the attendant psychological and spiritual pitfalls that placing oneself in such a position of power and superiority entails.
So if we do what we must, then we will fall prey? :huh:

blackduckdog2 wrote:And forgiveness is likely the only way out of that, especially on a community wide basis. Otherwise, that lynch mob mentality you inveighed against is just a heartbeat away (I'd say it's already there, to tell the truth……….just look at the reaction of people outside the prison walls during an execution)
These two are totally disconnected. I believe this is your collective view as opposed to individual view. Two individuals are involved. One was victimized and one victimized. Who is the "community" going to forgive and for what? Next time you wrong your wife, tell her it is OK, SpinnerMan has forgiven you or just say the community has forgiven you. It's just totally irrational and I wouldn't recommend she have any heavy objects in her hand, although at this point she would problem expect this silliness and has already forgiven you for it.

The reaction of the people outside of the walls of an execution is what percent of the population. They are not a reflection of society as a whole. However, that is why we have to make the decisions on the appropriate punishment for a crime a priori and not after we have a personal and/or emotional attachment to the victim or the murderer. This is why all the decision makers in the process need to be independent third parties without emotional attachment nor interest in the outcome and all the other things we do to try to get a fair and rational process and often relocate trials to avoid the heated emotions.

blackduckdog2 wrote:If I have to kill them, I'll kill them (remember, though, that I'm the only one I'm trusting with the power to do so) But if I gotta be hangman, I'm at least gonna be aware of the dangers involved)
You would trust yourself if it was your wife or yourself or someone else you love and care about to make these decision? :fingerpt: That would be a horrible system. I will trust the unanimous judgment of 12 responsible adults chosen at random with no connections and no benefit from the outcome. I would not trust my family to judge me fairly, but I would love for them to be on the jury :yes:
A politician thinks of the next election; a statesman of the next generation. A politician looks for the success of his party; a statesman for that of the country. The statesman wished to steer, while the politician was satisfied to drift.
User avatar
SpinnerMan
hunter
 
Posts: 16053
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:24 am
Location: Joliet, IL

Re: Christianity and the Death Penalty

Postby blackduckdog2 » Thu Dec 05, 2013 1:24 pm

assateague wrote:I forgive as much as possible. However, that certainly doesn't mean someone cannot be punished for their actions. Nor is punishment "vengeance".

But it can be………..and I think that's what Jesus is inveighing against. I'd say if you can't do it with forgiveness, then you'd better be prepared for the negative effects it will have on your psyche, which I believe will be considerable, but your mileage may vary. And Spinner, what we have here is a thread titled "Christianity and the Death Penalty"; yeah, I think forgiveness oughta be part and parcel of that discussion
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
User avatar
blackduckdog2
hunter
 
Posts: 6290
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:02 am

PreviousNext

Return to Controversial Issues Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests