New pup

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New pup

Postby Duckbuster109 » Tue Oct 25, 2005 8:47 pm

Hey guys! My girlfriend just got me an 8 week female chocolate lab! I'm pretty excited about her. I'm hoping to be able to take her to a trainer at about 8 months, but I was wondering if it is something I should try to work on with her little by little now. If there is something, could you give me some instructions?

Thanks for any help!
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Postby cmelik10 » Tue Oct 25, 2005 9:45 pm

Congrates on the pup first off right now have fun with her and let her be a puppy. Get yourself a proven program like Evan Grahams Smartwork program, or Mike Lardys program (they go hand in hand so either one will be great), and start learning what is involved with training a dog. Next decide what your goals are for you dog: 1.) Titles 2.) Blue Collar Hunting Dog. But most of all right now have alot of fun with her and create that bond that is so important to become a strong team.

Good Luck
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Postby ME » Tue Oct 25, 2005 9:48 pm

Get the book "how to help gun dogs train themselves" By Joan Bailey


It will help you to behave the correct way to get the dog off on the right foot.

I'm pretty excited about her.


If I had a girlfriend like that I would be excited about ther too!!! :thumbsup:
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Postby razorbackhunter » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:20 am

One word. TIME.

Spend time with the dog. As much as you can. Take her everywhere.
Going to get gas, take her.
Going to get beer, take her.
Going to a strip club, well don't take her, but you get the idea.

The more time you spend with the dog, the stronger your bond will be. She will become so devoted to you, she'd chew off her foot to get home.

Too bad my last girlfriend wasn't like that! :toofunny:
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Postby harvey1b » Wed Oct 26, 2005 2:42 pm

that's great. congrats on the pup! got any pics?

You're getting some great advice here. Definately plan to take the dog everywhere like razor says, but limit the interaction with other dogs until she has gotten the full gammit of shots. Puppies can pick up some nasty stuff before their immune system is up to speed. I can't remember the exact illness that they warn you of. Your vet will know. By socializing the dog will be well rounded and helps a ton hunting. With a large variety of experiences under her belt she won't be freaked out when hunting with new people, new dogs, or new places. I took my pup everywhere and still do. The more time you spend with the dog the more the two of you will be on the same page.

Also, definately get a training guide. I like Richard Wolters "Water Dog". It is easy to follow and the progression is strait forward. Training your own dog is a bit of work but you will be rewarded by the fact that you trained her and she truly is YOUR dog. If you opt for a professional trainer, being familiar with the commands your dog will learn will be helpful.

Most importantly have fun with your dog!!
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Postby IBBoykin » Thu Oct 27, 2005 3:16 pm

I firmly believe that training begins the second you take possession of a dog. This is the time that their brains start absorbing and taking in, whether it is right or wrong.
www.fetchpup.com
there are three articles on this website that I feel are essential. The first is: The Nature of the Beast, Pup as a pack animal.
The second is: the top ten practices that interfere with training your dog.
The last, well to me is the most important: Obedience is a way of life, not a 15 minute drill.
I firmly believe if you follow these guidelines, that by 8 months you will have an extremely obedient dog that is 150% ready to go into formal retriever training whether by you or by a professional. Remember, amateurs have one advantage over professionals, and that is their love and bond with the dog.
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Postby Fowlercon » Fri Oct 28, 2005 1:04 pm

IBBoykin wrote:I firmly believe that training begins the second you take possession of a dog. This is the time that their brains start absorbing and taking in, whether it is right or wrong.
www.fetchpup.com
there are three articles on this website that I feel are essential. The first is: The Nature of the Beast, Pup as a pack animal.
The second is: the top ten practices that interfere with training your dog.
The last, well to me is the most important: Obedience is a way of life, not a 15 minute drill.
I firmly believe if you follow these guidelines, that by 8 months you will have an extremely obedient dog that is 150% ready to go into formal retriever training whether by you or by a professional. Remember, amateurs have one advantage over professionals, and that is their love and bond with the dog.


:withstupid: I'm with him, but I don't think he's stupid.
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Postby reedp79 » Mon Oct 31, 2005 9:22 pm

Congrats on the new pup. I would definately also recomend Richard Walters book "water dog". Follow it and you should have a great dog. Also remember that your dog will also be your best friend, take it everywhere and form a strong bond. Also, not all dogs are perfect field trial dogs, as long as she/he fulfills your needs hunting, who cares about living up to someone elses expectations. The most fun I have hunting these days is watching my dog work.
Good Luck
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Postby AlaskaRedneK » Mon Oct 31, 2005 10:33 pm

Congrats on the new pup!!! :salude:

When she gits a lil older.. make shure you stress obedience. I wish i would have.... Now trainin is alot harder when the dog wont come the first time you call :hammering:

Good Luck and post pics!!! :thumbsup:
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Postby pointimgdogs » Tue Nov 01, 2005 9:53 am

Howdy Duckbuster, I would also recommend a crate or dog box .That’s their safe place. Crate train them when they are pups. I once had to run into a jobsite meeting it was suppose to last only 15minets 2 hours later I returned to my new F-250 super turbo Diesel only to find I had left my pups crate door open . Ford’s leather must taste mighty good. He chewed seats, armrest, the leather steering wheel wrap ,the end of the gear shift knob, anything he could get his teeth on . He did not even touch the chew toy that was in his crate! To top that off there was an unopened can of beer sitting in that tray in the center console , he bit holes in that ,drank the beer and passed out in my chewed up drivers seat. !!!!!!! I THINK HE IS A REDNECK !!!!!!! To this day you cannot set a beer down near him ! He will turn it over and Drink it. I AM SURE HE IS A REDNECK.
MY new diesel pick-em-up truck is a Chevy. I heard Chevy’s leather doesn’t taste as good as Ford.
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Pupparoo

Postby Brydog » Thu Nov 03, 2005 8:44 am

I totaly agree with IBBoykin and hvacfowler. I couldnt have said it better myself.
You can start obedience training right now without pup even knowing it. When you see pup coming toward you, squat down and tell the pup "Come" When you see her getting ready to sit down, say "Sit" When you see her getting ready to lay down..........Well you get the picture.
DO NOT be harsh with pup during your housebreaking period. Every thing has to be good.

Congrats, and good luck to you and your pup.
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scenting

Postby pointimgdogs » Thu Nov 03, 2005 12:34 pm

One of the games I play with my pups is the scenting game I place the pup in his crate so he cannot see me. Then I drag a small piece of hot dog around then hide it in the grass. I then release him and bring him around to that area . Give him the command and watch him have fun finding his reward. As he gets better at the game I increase the level of difficulty .
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