How versatile are chesapeakes?

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How versatile are chesapeakes?

Postby waterfowler82 » Thu Dec 22, 2005 9:56 pm

I've always been a fan of labs, but always admired chessies. Is a well-bred chessie as versatile as a well-bred lab for hunting upland game, blood trailing game, etc, etc? (I already now the answer when it comes to waterfowl... :thumbsup: )

I know that they definitely have the hunting blood, but will they tire quickly or overheat hunting dove on a hot September 1st?

One more thing, I've heard that they can be a bit hard headed (and I know that this is a dog-by-dog type of thing, but certain breeds have certain undeniable traits, just work with me here) and can even have a tendency for aggressiveness. I need a good family dog as well as a durable hunter, would a chessie be right for me?
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Postby Duck Whittler » Thu Dec 22, 2005 10:39 pm

I can only speak from my personal expierence with a Chessie and she was just as good at upland hunting as waterfowl. As far as blood trailing I couldn't say never used her for that.
Mine never got overheated or tired dove hunting but , I always took along plenty of cool water for her and tried to keep her in the shade as much as possible ( same as I do now for my black lab)
Mine was great with the family as good of a baby sitter as you would want with kids, they were her kids and no one bothered them with her around. She was not agressive when she was not confined in the truck or the boat, but it was not a wise idea for a stranger to stick thier hand in the truck when she was there, probably the best watch dog I ever had. When she was loose she would come up to a stranger and sniff of them and walk away from them she didn't care much to be petted by anyone other than the family but was not agresive shen someone tried to pet her.Is a Chessie right for you? Only you can say .
As far as being hard headed , my lab is far more hard headed than the Chessie was. As far as trainablity they are about the same , a Chessie may be a little softer than a lab and not quite as forgiving. If I could have found a good breeder with the right chessie lines in my area I would have had another one.
Hope this helps a little I am only speaking from my expierence with them in my opinion they are great dogs.
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Postby waterfowler82 » Thu Dec 22, 2005 10:42 pm

Thanks for the feedback, Wes. What do you mean by "a little softer and not as forgiving"?
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Postby hunt-chessies » Fri Dec 23, 2005 5:13 am

:withstupid: wow thats about it folks, couldn't have said it any better myself!!! what he ment by softer and not as forgiving is you can screw up with a lab, ignore it for weeks, beat the living snot out of it and a lab will come back everytime and put its head in your lap. A chessie will hold a grudge and they will remember that bad situation. you have to read the dog and know when your on a dead end road, if your in a no win situation as a trainer with a chessie shut it down, think it over and come back with a different angle. as for what they can do the sky is the limit with any breed, the question is can you as a trainer teach it to them. I've only used mine for waterfowl and upland and there good at both. since they have good noses and are a very smart breed i can't see why blood trailing would be hard, my breeder uses his as a sheep dog and chicken retriever also on his farm.
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Postby Duck Whittler » Fri Dec 23, 2005 7:21 am

Yep HC knew exactly what I meant about them being a litle softer and not a s forgiving as a lab. But all in all the are great dogs, you gotta love em.
I will add this about them, they are very detemined dogs if a cripple is down they are going to get it period. So determined sometimes if you are on realy big water you have to watch them so they don't get themselves in trouble . You might have to go get them cause they won't quit.
Also I think that you stand a good chance of getting a good hunting dog with a good breeder because they aen't the dog of the week and haven't been bred with everything from beagles to poodles. I am not bashing Labs because I have a good one, but as I said earlier if I could have found the right Chessie when I was looking for another dog I would have one now.
Good luck........Wes
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Postby Fowlercon » Fri Dec 23, 2005 12:54 pm

I agree with everyone. Here's a little story of blood-trailing from this year;

I was hunting with my father-in-law and I had shot a mallard and only clipped it. It fell on the iced over pond we hunt about 80 yards away reached the shore and crawled across and down the other side of the dam. My dog was in the water at this point and I called him back to me for fear of him screwing around with potentially thin ice. We walked around the pond to the middle of the dam and I lined him on the duck who was about 50 yards down the dam; he went and got the duck and we resumed hunting.

Two hours later we ended the hunt and my father-in-law left driving his car across the dam with Deuce in hot pursuit.(he has been taught to follow cars, namely mine, when I'm running him out at our farm.)Well they get to about where that duck crossed over the dam two hours earlier and at a full tilt run Deuce put on the breaks and went down after that trail that the duck had left. So, yes, I think that qualifies as a good nose.
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Postby T-Bone » Sat Dec 24, 2005 5:41 pm

I am on my second, female Chesapeake. Both have been very water- loving, waterfowl retrievers and among the BEST pheasant dogs; that I have seen in the field.

Much of the bad press on Chesapeakes is based on rumor and word of mouth by individuals that have never owned one. The "train them with a 2'X4' " comments are a BIG MISTAKE. A firm word or two and at most, a quick shake is the best correction or they will "shut off".

I would suggest a female for a first time, Chesapeake owner. And once you have owned one; you will find it hard not to own another.
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Postby snakeyez » Sun Dec 25, 2005 7:32 pm

I agree with everyone else, Chessies are great at upland game and waterfowl. I would also go with a female for your first chessie and definitly read up on the breed, they are different than a lab. I own one of each and they are definitly different.
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