* * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

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Postby HNTFSH » Sun Jan 06, 2008 10:45 am

MacMan wrote:
HNTFSH wrote:
MacMan wrote:It is great however for the 150 yrd swimming on occassion to keep her active.


Not to mention scaring a few soccer moms at the local park. :yes:


I think Jaz and I both get a kick from some folks reaction. . . Once at a park a lady walked all the way around where we were training and asked me not to fire that thing - her dog wouldn't come out from the bushes - Yes Mam!

Our HRC has a pneumatic 6 dummy launcher w/ remote that's real nice -


:rofl: :rofl:

I know...it does take some common sense and diplomacy. You would think several hundred yards away from any other activity would be satisfactory. I guess the bumper launcher is one of those aire-on-the-side-of-caution deals.

Yea...the bumper boys are nice. Gotta love club equipment.
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Postby MacMan » Sun Jan 06, 2008 1:00 pm

Judicious use - Tis True HNTFSH - this park is one of the largest "no leash" parks around and great for socializing dogs - it's also a park that our HRC has drive on privlidges and where we conduct most of our training days and other events as well. It's probably 1000 acres of rolling hills, lakes etc. and city Gov't wants to build a road through there - gheesss. Down here the birds know where they can go - this place is full of ducks and I can't get a shot on the lease these days.
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Postby cooter » Sun Jan 06, 2008 1:32 pm

MacMan wrote:
I train alone most of the time as I work her daily - especially in the winter or during hunting season when local HRC is inactive. I use a .22 dummy launcher. Jaz seems to be smart enough to understand where it's coming from be it from be or a birdboy - I'm launching 4 dummys - Ex long 75yrd + to short 35 - 40yrds.


I think this is great, and a person just has to use whatrever he can to work on things. When you talk about launching 4 dummies, is that multiple marks, or 4 singles. Which there is nothing wrong with it, whether it be multiple or single, just trying to get a better understanding. The one thing I don't like with the Should launchers is this. The dog gets use to seeing the bird/bumper come from you right side, or leave from where you are standing. With you have your dog at a trainer, this may not be a problem for you. But many guys that do their our training with these launchers run the rish of you commanding MARK and the dog looks at you instead of out front.

Then you shoot you gun and the dog MARKS the shell ejecting from you gun, and retrieves it for ya. They missed what was happening out front, because the bird/bumper never left, so they are still watchiung for it. All they see if the shell ejecting. These are great for working, but a guy that is using on of these MUST find a way to launch from the field, wingers, BirdBoys, etc. Also, look for another guy in the HRC group that you can call and set up a day that both of you can work. Then don't do ANY shooting the launcher from your side. You shoot from the field while he is working hsi dog, and he shoots for you. But all launching is done from the field. But it is not a problem when you can make both lind of situations work for you.

MacMan wrote:Sometimes in water and land or mixed. She gets them fine even if I mix the order; am I creating a bad habit here?


I don't see a problem with it. I figure we are talking about singles, so the dog is marking and retrieving. No Way to screw this up, and it is good work. Randomly change up the distance, which I figure you do. Shoot one 25 yards, and then 75 yards, then 50, etc.

MacMan wrote:Sometimes I'll put her on the line with a STAY and move 25 yrds away and launch then return to the line. Her trainer didn't really like this too much as her attention would be on me! Thoughts?


I also agree with your trainer. There is NO benefit tow the lesson you are working. I only know 1 situation that resemble what you are doing that is a real hunting situation, and that is Pond Jumping. But even it is not the same. Your walking up on a Pond Dam, and SIT your dog before you start up. This is to keep him from cresting the Dam before the shooters, but this is just a straight up SIT command.

Our dogs are usually beside us. So this is where you want you training to take place. Now on my personal Dog I yteach a PLACE command. I do have a couple of places that have little cover, except a couple of stumps out about thigh deep in water. I will SIT the dog on the bank sometimes 50-60 yards away, in brush or under a tree. Then I will wader out to the stump.

I'll down a bird, call the name of the dog to start the retrieve, she will retrieve and bring me the bird, and I will command PLACE, and she will return to the stop I have set for PLACE. I mark this spot with a 2' X 2' grass front door mat. She will return to PLACE and we start over.

But even this is just a command like SIT. Clear as Muddy Water huh. cooter
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Postby MacMan » Mon Jan 07, 2008 12:41 pm

cooter wrote:
MacMan wrote:
I train alone most of the time as I work her daily - especially in the winter or during hunting season when local HRC is inactive. I use a .22 dummy launcher. Jaz seems to be smart enough to understand where it's coming from be it from be or a birdboy - I'm launching 4 dummys - Ex long 75yrd + to short 35 - 40yrds.


I think this is great, and a person just has to use whatrever he can to work on things. When you talk about launching 4 dummies, is that multiple marks, or 4 singles. Which there is nothing wrong with it, whether it be multiple or single, just trying to get a better understanding. The one thing I don't like with the Should launchers is this. The dog gets use to seeing the bird/bumper come from you right side, or leave from where you are standing. With you have your dog at a trainer, this may not be a problem for you. But many guys that do their our training with these launchers run the rish of you commanding MARK and the dog looks at you instead of out front.

Then you shoot you gun and the dog MARKS the shell ejecting from you gun, and retrieves it for ya. They missed what was happening out front, because the bird/bumper never left, so they are still watchiung for it. All they see if the shell ejecting. These are great for working, but a guy that is using on of these MUST find a way to launch from the field, wingers, BirdBoys, etc. Also, look for another guy in the HRC group that you can call and set up a day that both of you can work. Then don't do ANY shooting the launcher from your side. You shoot from the field while he is working hsi dog, and he shoots for you. But all launching is done from the field. But it is not a problem when you can make both lind of situations work for you.

MacMan wrote:Sometimes in water and land or mixed. She gets them fine even if I mix the order; am I creating a bad habit here?


I don't see a problem with it. I figure we are talking about singles, so the dog is marking and retrieving. No Way to screw this up, and it is good work. Randomly change up the distance, which I figure you do. Shoot one 25 yards, and then 75 yards, then 50, etc.

MacMan wrote:Sometimes I'll put her on the line with a STAY and move 25 yrds away and launch then return to the line. Her trainer didn't really like this too much as her attention would be on me! Thoughts?


I also agree with your trainer. There is NO benefit tow the lesson you are working. I only know 1 situation that resemble what you are doing that is a real hunting situation, and that is Pond Jumping. But even it is not the same. Your walking up on a Pond Dam, and SIT your dog before you start up. This is to keep him from cresting the Dam before the shooters, but this is just a straight up SIT command.

Our dogs are usually beside us. So this is where you want you training to take place. Now on my personal Dog I yteach a PLACE command. I do have a couple of places that have little cover, except a couple of stumps out about thigh deep in water. I will SIT the dog on the bank sometimes 50-60 yards away, in brush or under a tree. Then I will wader out to the stump.

I'll down a bird, call the name of the dog to start the retrieve, she will retrieve and bring me the bird, and I will command PLACE, and she will return to the stop I have set for PLACE. I mark this spot with a 2' X 2' grass front door mat. She will return to PLACE and we start over.

But even this is just a command like SIT. Clear as Muddy Water huh. cooter



NOPE - very clear Cooter - I appreciate the input. My dummy launching is multiple - shoot 4 - start retrieving! However, like HNTFSH alluded to - I have one dummy that's the size of softball and is shaped to travel far. I use this more often than not just to work her out. She's crated up all day and I wouldn't feel right by NOT working her hard an hour or so each day. I do use the place command, but I've not enforced it out in the field as we do flooded timber and I set up a tree stand for us both to hunt from. She sees what I see, maybe next year I get her to hunt from her own stand. I tried shotting the dummy from a distance and sending her - she runs straight to me and then out.

BTW - I was unable to go hunting this past weekend and they whacked 'em. Limits morning and evening - bad timing for me.
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Postby Joel » Sat May 03, 2008 1:42 pm

just wanted to bump this for the new guys
make sure you scrach my Cooder, tickle my Cricket and feed Jake <thats my pups>
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Postby big37dog » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:06 am

I would also add DOWN and PLACE ( I use the word BOX)
These are two great commands that you can begin to condition into a pup as soon as he is settled into his new home.

Remember that conditioning is very soft training with the idea of 'showing"the pup.So he will fully understand a little later.

I firmly believe that a pup ought to be kept in a crate in the house ( i am a one dog owner, my dog is my buddy) for the first month I kept the crate by my bed nightime.This way I can house ytrain as well, when pup would get restless in middle of night I would get up and take him out

Find a treat the dog likes and toss the treat in box, then give command BOX UP.Dog should not enter until command is given
The crate to a pup has to be the safest place in the world, and nothing bad EVER happens when he is there.Pup never comes out of box unless you tell him.
This will imprint what WILL be expected later.NO EXCEPTIONS
My pup at 4 months would, leave the living room and go to bedroom and get in his box and wait. Of course his treat was waiting for him.
Later..BOX can become PLACE in the field, be it the duck boat, blind,ATV or under a tree.

DOWN..(assume the postion)
Dog on all four haunches, chin on floor. NO EXCEPTIONS
As soon as pup is settled in his new home begin. Again, this is conditioning, soft fun training, to introduce the pup to a command that will be firmed up later.

Using treats, hold treat to the floor in your finger tips, move it slowly away from pup.The moment before he takes it say DOWN and softly push his shoulders forward and to floor.Gently smooth dog dog while adjusting his postion Give him treat and praise. He will learn game quickly and lay down to get his treat.

DOWN as I have said is probably next to COME in importance.

A dog that will reliably DOWN, anytime , anywhere is a dog that can be trained to do almost anything. Its the ultimate control tool you can have.

I think that too many people wait until pup is 4 or months old to begin training. I think that by beginning "Conditioning Training" as soon as pup is settled in new home the more serious training that will come later will go more easily and be a more happy experience for dog.Also it will from day one, build a stronger bond between you and pup. And The pup will from day one know his place in your family pack.
Often the hardest part of training a dog is getting him to fully understand what you expect ( consistency)
By conditioning these commands as a puppy the task is much easier. Once a dog understands a command fully and does not comply. Well thats defiance.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby 1ynggun » Thu Apr 02, 2009 12:51 pm

all of that is excellent informatoin. My pup is 11 weeks old. I have him trained to sit each time before he is to do a formal retrieve during our 10 min sessions every morning and night. I only do about 3-5 retrieves and put the bumper up. He does an excellent job with this and has it down pat, almost to the point where I am afraid he is going to get bored. I am thinking about working on steadying him now, to wait until i call his name for a retrieve. Is it too early for that, or is there something else i can work with him on. He learns extremely fast and is always pumped when i bring out his bumper.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby Blackdogs » Tue Apr 07, 2009 2:22 pm

2) When and how to introduce Birds? (10Wks-6MO)
After pup is doing well on play retrieves with small bumpers it is time to introduce birds. Using a freshly killed pigeon arouse the pups intirest and give it a short toss. If the pup chases out and picks up the bird pour on the praise but only after your pup has actually picked up the bird. If your pup doesn’t look like it is going to pick the bird up try one more excited throw and put the bird away even if they don't pick it up on this second try. To get pup back you might have to use a light check cord (15ft) and reel them in gently. Always remembering to reach for the pup and not the object pick pup up and usually they will release the bird. If they hang on gently press down on the lower jar and roll the bird out praising the whole time. Continue to mix in birds occasionally with your play retrieves to keep their desire high until the adult teeth come in and F-F begins.


So what do you do with a 10 week old pup that has LOCKJAW on the pigeon? Like get the jaws of life out, lockjaw?
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby CutEmMS » Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:43 am

Awesome info! my male black lab pup is three months old and he is catching on pretty well, he will jump in the pool and bring a full size mallard dummy. this is my first time training a pup. Any other tips or advice for somebody new to it like me?
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby Baker » Thu Aug 06, 2009 8:31 am

Some great information here for us prospective duck dog owners. I'm new here, but did quite a bit of duck and quail (pronounced berd') hunting untill I got married and had kids and sort of became obsessed with fishing. Anyway, my Dad and I always had bird dogs (setters and pointers as we're talking NE NC and SE VA) so I thought I'd post up a simple, cheap, little tip we used to use on young puppies to help condition them to loud noises and hopefully help prevent gun-shyness in the future. We had a concrete surface in the dog pens and when we had a litter of pups (not often, we were'nt breeders) or even one or two pups we'd suspend a metal trash can lid from a coated piece of cable a couple of inches over the surface of the run. The pups would play with it, on it, around it and so were constantly around noise. Seemed to help, never had a problem with gun shy dogs after that and never heard back from any of the pups we sold or gave away that they turned out gun shy. Anyway, thought I'd toss that out there, maybe it'll help someone.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby Boom » Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:45 am

Thanks for posting this stuff. Its great info. I am a total rookie when it comes to this. We just got our first lab 1 week ago and she is now 7 weeks old. She does well as far as sitting,coming and going potty outside. So far so good!
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby lablady » Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:25 pm

If you go to sight and send me your address i will be glad to send you my seminar booklet with drills and basics also if you have problems along the way i will help as i can if you call please do so after dark as i train 6 days a week till dark then have dog chores we train young dogs for some of the top field trialers in game also there are some videos for you as your dog gets older but most of tdogs in the videos are under a year old

Tera www.Baybluekennels.com
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby pete/pmr » Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:28 pm

any thoughts on picking out a puppy from a litter? You know what I mean, how to figure out the best puppy in the litter,or are they all good? I have acouple ideas that have been thrown at me,one is to put them on a table with only one way off,and the first one to figure it out is the one showing the most ability to solve problems,the other is attention span,see which one stays focused on you moreand for the longest,and the third is to place a small barrier inbetween the puppies and a toy,bumper,squeaky toy,and then let them see you drop it behind the barrier,and the one that firgures this out first to get too the toy,says it all right!? But any other suggestions I am open to,this is my first puppy,and I am going to see them tomorrow at 10 am,yellow labs!3 males and 4 females! So I am hoping for some feedback,my email address is pmrbyeyeconst@yahoo.com,thanks for any and all help!
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby badbowtie » Mon Jan 11, 2010 2:59 pm

hey just want to say thanks. this is a great thread. have a 9wk BLF. She sits, and starting to retreieve small dummies.
I started her on stay yesterday.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby ILgoosehunter12 » Thu Jan 14, 2010 4:27 pm

THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!! i got me a new yellow lab pup yesterday. and she is 2.5 months old. she is doing REALLY good for only being at my house for just about a day now. she listens to me and she is a lovey dog. but we got her in the house and we have 3 cats and she wants to play with them. we do the training outside in the barn. the sit command and the down command. she does those really good. all i did was do what you told me. just tell her sit and push her butt down then praise her like crazy. then i did that 5 or 6 more times and she got the hang of it. now she sits when i tell her too. thats a good start it hink for training my first dog. now i am working onthe down command and shes getting the hang of it too.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby duckaholic_16p » Thu Feb 04, 2010 9:59 pm

crate training, so are you saying pup only needs to drink twice a day when he eats?
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby greenhead3 » Sun Aug 15, 2010 5:00 pm

Great post cooter. lots of info
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby mcclinj » Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:18 pm

Does Anybody have any experience with or thoughts on the book "Training the Sporting Dog" by Don Smith & Ervin Jones? It was on the list of recommended books by a GSP breeder I'm looking into.

-John
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby Machen » Fri Oct 01, 2010 10:04 am

Thanks for the tips. I just got my first dog. He's a black lab. Any advice on biting and chewing?
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby TomKat » Thu Oct 21, 2010 12:57 pm

Machen wrote:Thanks for the tips. I just got my first dog. He's a black lab. Any advice on biting and chewing?


DO NOT let the pup bite your hands. As for chewing...thats what labs do! LOL Give them a chew toy and encourage him to chew on that, rather than your furniture, etc.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby DonaldHomes » Wed Jun 29, 2011 2:26 am

These trainings can be done also on cats. I want my pet cat to learn it also. I would apply these trainings on her.

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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby jannypan » Sat Jul 02, 2011 8:59 pm

I've put together a simple list of "frequently asked questions" that are vital to all retriever puppies regardless of how high our future goals for them might be. These answers are all based on proven training practices that will help set the stage for more formal training in the future to come.
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby kg28 » Tue Aug 02, 2011 4:39 pm

I was wondering if anyone can help me out??? I have a 4 month old black lab who loves loves loves to retrieve and has the drive of a 3 yr old. he has got sit and long sits down where i can walk away about 50 ft and he will stay put. we are working on heeling at the moment and working on some steadiness retrieves he does GREAT!! with all of those. My problem is that when i throw the dummy he will go straight to it 100 mph and then come back and when he is on his way back he like purposely drops it, and shakes it around and runs right past me or doesnt even come to me at all some times. its like he is playing with it and is playing keep away. This only happens a 1/4 of the time and I dont want to yell at him cause he is so young. so i just walk to him and get it. He also picks up the bumper and the bird dummy by the string or the ends of the bumper i dont know if this is all this a puppy thing or is all this something i am doing wrong.
please give me some tips and info or if you have had this happen before .
thanks
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby Tcjfowler » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:17 am

Great info guys! :clapping:
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Re: * * Early Puppy Training Techniques * *

Postby pheasanthunter » Wed Feb 15, 2012 9:48 pm

hey every one! I just got a 12 week old springer 5 days ago and am i need of some refrences for tranning her (pheasant mostly) I have a 8 year old springer I trained when I was 12. He does good in the field. He LOVESSSS hunting and goes crazy every time he sees any type of gun or a winged creature. He has a great nose and manages to put up birds when no one else can and he retrives great too (water, land) but he dosent like to to give the bird to me once he comes he just chomps on it in front of me :hammer: :hammer: I cant complain not a bad job for a 12 year old but now I want to train this young pup the right way!
I have taught her sit, she can stay pretty good and has no problem retreving and dropping toys at my feet but getting her to give me the pheasant wing is a bit problematic. shes brings it near me but like my older dog she just wants to eat it... :help: what am I doing wrong? thanks yall!
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