Chessies "protectiveness"

Share hunting dog tips, hunting dog training questions or links of interest here.

Moderators: HNTFSH, hunt-chessies, swampbilly 1980, captainkevan

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby Rick Hall » Sat Aug 24, 2013 3:56 am

Been my experience (seven little ones and three Chessies) that the Chesapeake rides end peacefully when the "horse" has had enough and stands up.

Your mileage may vary.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 13219
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm


Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby gearhead80 » Sat Aug 24, 2013 5:29 am

I have a 2 year old Chessie and she is wonderful!! I've been around a lot of different breeds of dogs and get this.. She acts like a dogs.. Just like humans, any dog can have under developed social skills and will act differently.

Interesting facts... Right from the American Human Association.

An estimated 4.7 million dog bites occur in the U.S. each year2,3
Nearly 800,000 dog bites require medical care2
Approximately 92% of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94% of which were not neutered1
Approximately 25% of fatal dog attacks involved chained dogs1
Approximately 71% of bites occur to the extremities (arms, legs, hands, feet)2
Approximately two-thirds of bites occurred on or near the victim’s property, and most victims knew the dog
The insurance industry pays more than $1 billion in dog-bite claims each year3
At least 25 different breeds of dogs have been involved in the 238 dog-bite-related fatalities in the U.S.4
Approximately 24% of human deaths involved unrestrained dogs off of their owners’ property4
Approximately 58% of human deaths involved unrestrained dogs on their owners’ property4

”Biting has more to do with circumstances, behavior, training (or lack thereof), and ignorance on the part of human beings.”
If I ask a question, I don't want your opinion. I want facts.
Don't tell me something you think, tell me something you know.
It's easier to say I don't know, than make something up.
Although, being a forum the next guy will know more no matter what.
gearhead80
hunter
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:58 am
Location: ogle county

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby stut8500 » Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:45 am

Makes sense. When I was five I had to have facial reconstruction surgery when an American Eskimo took my top lip off... Dog wasn't neutered, and it was our family dog.
ATO
User avatar
stut8500
hunter
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:17 pm
Location: Silverthorne, CO

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby ibedamn » Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:55 am

I've had two chessies. The 1st was protective. Anything he was tied to or in was his. Me and a hunting buddy after five days of staying in the same motel room with this guy and the dog, we're hunting a small island in big water. Both of us went out to rearrange the decoys. As I was finishing up he started back to the makeshift blind. My chessie met him at the shore line and would not let him back in the blind. The blind had the bird pile and those birds were his. He never did bite anybody, but no one ever challenged him. My 2nd chessie wouldn't harm a fly. He had a tremendous drive to hunt but never aggressive to people or other dogs. The 1st dog's aggressiveness might of been my fault, but I do think it has more to do with the breeding.
User avatar
ibedamn
hunter
 
Posts: 699
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 10:06 am
Location: NC

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby O.D.Lid » Sat Aug 24, 2013 11:34 am

Every chessie i have known has bitten! Many different owners many different scenario's! Sometimes strangers, sometimes owners, and once the owners 3 year old daughter!
If the ocean was made of WHISKEY and I was a DUCK I'd swim to the bottom and get all F!@#% up!
User avatar
O.D.Lid
hunter
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 8:43 pm
Location: Southern Idaho

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby ohio mike » Sat Aug 24, 2013 1:35 pm

Had a brown dog that was very protective of family,house, car, and boat. A bum got a hell of a sore ass for approaching the kids when we lived in town. The kids laid on him to watch TV and he actually loved all kids. He was a chocolate lab. Go figure?
Life is to short to hunt with a ugly gun.
ohio mike
hunter
 
Posts: 2142
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:08 pm
Location: Northwest Ohio

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby Scott. » Sun Aug 25, 2013 1:03 am

My chessie is as friendly as a dog can be. Unless you step in his truck, boat, yard, etc when I'm not there. He's never hurt anyone, but he's puckered a few buttholes before. He's a smaller chessie by breed standards so he has Napoleon syndrome too :lol3:
"Honorable scars are not to be penalized."
"There are two kinds of people in the world without beards. Women and boys. I am neither."
WOOOOO PIG SOOOOIEEE
User avatar
Scott.
hunter
 
Posts: 981
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2011 1:03 am

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby gock5 » Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:28 am

mr.garrett2 wrote:Ok so it can be said that the agressive/protectiveness is to the individual. However, I have a valid question for those that have or have had kids/grandkids and Chessies: would you trust your dog to play with little ones? I have heard from a few already, but I am curious if you would trust your chessie with your children/grandchildren? For instance...tonight I looked over to see my son riding our current dog like a "horsey" and she didn't even move; not that it was ok it just happened. I only ask because I am seriously considering a chessie. I like a little fire in my dogs except when it comes to my kids.




i have a 6 yr old chessie female. Raised in a family of 3 kids that have their friends over all of the time. Never a problem. Also have young nieces and nephews, age 3 and under. The worst thing that has happened is Roxy knocking them over when walking by/next to them. No harm, no foul.

She is also very protective, especially if a stranger comes up to the door, but once we let her know that it's a "friend", she won't leave him alone. I know that if someone did try to come in the house, they'd pay for it dearly.

It really is a matter on how you raise your dog, no matter if it's a chessie, lab, etc. I think we've done a pretty good job.
User avatar
gock5
hunter
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 9:31 am
Location: Central Illinois

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby Rick Hall » Sun Aug 25, 2013 10:12 am

O.D.Lid wrote:Every chessie i have known has bitten! Many different owners many different scenario's!


I'm quite curious where you've known "many" Chesapeakes, let alone all biters. Sounds like a good place to stay away from.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 13219
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby O.D.Lid » Sun Aug 25, 2013 11:14 am

I'll admit I haven't known that many chessie's but i do run field trials and hunt test so I have been around many. It is a general feeling among most dog people and it seems here on this forum that chessies are protective to point of being aggressive. Just my experience with the few I have known. Didn't mean to offend. :grooving:
If the ocean was made of WHISKEY and I was a DUCK I'd swim to the bottom and get all F!@#% up!
User avatar
O.D.Lid
hunter
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 8:43 pm
Location: Southern Idaho

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby Rick Hall » Sun Aug 25, 2013 5:01 pm

O.D.Lid wrote:I'll admit I haven't known that many chessie's but i do run field trials and hunt test so I have been around many. It is a general feeling among most dog people and it seems here on this forum that chessies are protective to point of being aggressive. Just my experience with the few I have known. Didn't mean to offend. :grooving:


In all candor, you didn't offend me at all, you had just lost all credibility with me until this clarification of what was an utterly unbelievable statement. Good of you to do so.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 13219
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby Scott. » Sun Aug 25, 2013 5:04 pm

A lot of people confuse the "I'm not gonna back down" attitude of a CBR with aggressiveness.
"Honorable scars are not to be penalized."
"There are two kinds of people in the world without beards. Women and boys. I am neither."
WOOOOO PIG SOOOOIEEE
User avatar
Scott.
hunter
 
Posts: 981
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2011 1:03 am

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby stut8500 » Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:51 pm

Also, anyone had any luck with sending Chessies off for professional training, or do they need to be trained by the owner?
ATO
User avatar
stut8500
hunter
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:17 pm
Location: Silverthorne, CO

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby gearhead80 » Mon Aug 26, 2013 5:45 am

stut8500 wrote:Also, anyone had any luck with sending Chessies off for professional training, or do they need to be trained by the owner?


I sent mine off for 4 weeks for help with my training. She did wonderful and I believe they have another one right now. This whole dog breed thing kills me. Yea Chessies are protective, it's just because Labs are too one track mind and or dumb to care about anything else. Plus Labs are like A-holes.. Everyone has one. When did the inbreeding in Labs begin?? hahahaha :lol3:
If I ask a question, I don't want your opinion. I want facts.
Don't tell me something you think, tell me something you know.
It's easier to say I don't know, than make something up.
Although, being a forum the next guy will know more no matter what.
gearhead80
hunter
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:58 am
Location: ogle county

Re: Chessies "protectiveness"

Postby SoupSandwich99 » Mon Aug 26, 2013 12:54 pm

Great story.

My Lab is a 70lb goofball - until someone walks up to the front door of our house, also one that is rarely used. It could even be me or my wife and he gets all excited. He calms down when we sit him and then open the door. I guess if whoever is OK with us that they are OK with him.

If someone came in the garage door he would likely help them load up their truck with my stuff, particularly if there was some Jif creamy peanut butter involved.

Dawnsearlylight wrote:
stut8500 wrote:I would like to hear more about the drunk stumbling in and getting attacked. I bet that's a pretty good story, and I find it pretty interesting the dog can determine a threat. My lab would of met them at the door with tail wagging and looking for a good pet. Very big sweet heart of a dog.


I was sick and sleeping on the couch near the front door, which no one ever uses. I woke up to the sound of someone fumbling around trying to open the door and my 100+ male on alert in front of it, quiet as a mouse. The guy finally opened the door, the dog said "bring it" and let him in get all the way in, determined he did not belong there and launched. It wound up with the guy flat on his back and the dog on top of him and lot of noise, I touched the dog and said "leave it" and he immediately broke off and sat next to me. The guy was so drunk he made a wrong turn heading home and wound up at my house instead of his own. There wasn't a mark on him except for a bruise where he hit the door sill, but it sounded like he was being disemboweled between him screeching and the dog roaring. He did sober up rather quickly once he saw Jesus and had fecal matter in his pants.

The only other time someone came in the front door at night was when my nephew used that door once, dog did the same thing and silently let him in, recognized him as "friend" and turned around and went back to bed, probably disappointed at no joy in that case.

Also had an incident with my current boy, guy I hunt with showed up with a big box of fast-grass for me, pounded on the door and threw it open and came in, completely hidden behind the box. Cirrus came by me like a shot with the nastiest growl I have ever heard from a dog and was right on top of the guy when he yelled the dog's name, the dog turned the aggression off like a light switch and started doing his happy dance. I have never seen a dog make a judgement and totally alter his behavior that quickly, and I have no idea what would have happened had the guy not spoken, nothing like that has occurred before or since.
SoupSandwich99
hunter
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:22 pm

Previous

Return to Hunting Dog Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: krazybronco2 and 17 guests