Dog bell

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Re: Dog bell

Postby Rick Hall » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:12 pm

HNTFSH wrote: And that all the State biologists, game folks, rabid Pheasant enthusiasts and people who actually live/hunt here conspire to lie to Rick Hall.


Naw, I just think you fib about shooting wild pheasants on public land.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby HNTFSH » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:20 pm

OHIODUCKA5 wrote:HNT, I don't know what part of the state you are in , but there isn't a wild pheasant in the 5 counties I hunt on public or private land. They release a bunch, the ones that dont get shot end up as coyote food.


That's a shame. I have birds within 15 of minutes of my house and in at least 7 counties we hunt. Some huntable, some not. I imagine t_Baker sees them as well. Have two on the Farm I hunt and hear the crows on the protected wetland it boarders. Honestly - anyone who tells me Ohio doesn't have a Pheasant population clearly isn't a true pheasant hunter. Or at least doesn't have the dog, faith, or time to pursue it.

Or maybe draws on their experiences only from 30 years ago which is hardly informed input. I've been here since 69 and remember the very thin days. Takes years, outings, work, and dog to be successful. People have a better chance of shooting a pen released bird on private or outlaying public ground in South Dakota.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby HNTFSH » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:22 pm

Rick Hall wrote:
HNTFSH wrote: And that all the State biologists, game folks, rabid Pheasant enthusiasts and people who actually live/hunt here conspire to lie to Rick Hall.


Naw, I just think you fib about shooting wild pheasants on public land.


Apparently. Shame you're not in tune with it.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby FLT MEDIC » Thu Mar 13, 2014 6:31 pm

Well thanks for the info. Seems split on whether a bell is fine or not. I guess I will form my own opinion training and next season. I've only hunted pheasant in nd, sd, and Washington state and it was on private property so I can't help with the "debate." I live in NV and me and my brittany hunt chukar. Thanks everyone!
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Dog bell

Postby Botiz630 » Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:08 pm

HNTFSH wrote:
OHIODUCKA5 wrote:HNT, I don't know what part of the state you are in , but there isn't a wild pheasant in the 5 counties I hunt on public or private land. They release a bunch, the ones that dont get shot end up as coyote food.


That's a shame. I have birds within 15 of minutes of my house and in at least 7 counties we hunt. Some huntable, some not. I imagine t_Baker sees them as well. Have two on the Farm I hunt and hear the crows on the protected wetland it boarders. Honestly - anyone who tells me Ohio doesn't have a Pheasant population clearly isn't a true pheasant hunter. Or at least doesn't have the dog, faith, or time to pursue it.

Or maybe draws on their experiences only from 30 years ago which is hardly informed input. I've been here since 69 and remember the very thin days. Takes years, outings, work, and dog to be successful. People have a better chance of shooting a pen released bird on private or outlaying public ground in South Dakota.


I'll say I've heard them cackling while on property nowhere near public hunting ground.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby HNTFSH » Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:35 pm

Botiz630 wrote:
HNTFSH wrote:
OHIODUCKA5 wrote:HNT, I don't know what part of the state you are in , but there isn't a wild pheasant in the 5 counties I hunt on public or private land. They release a bunch, the ones that dont get shot end up as coyote food.


That's a shame. I have birds within 15 of minutes of my house and in at least 7 counties we hunt. Some huntable, some not. I imagine t_Baker sees them as well. Have two on the Farm I hunt and hear the crows on the protected wetland it boarders. Honestly - anyone who tells me Ohio doesn't have a Pheasant population clearly isn't a true pheasant hunter. Or at least doesn't have the dog, faith, or time to pursue it.

Or maybe draws on their experiences only from 30 years ago which is hardly informed input. I've been here since 69 and remember the very thin days. Takes years, outings, work, and dog to be successful. People have a better chance of shooting a pen released bird on private or outlaying public ground in South Dakota.


I'll say I've heard them cackling while on property nowhere near public hunting ground.


There's little to no nesting cover on the large public tracts. Most of those areas are designed around public 'land' surrounding State Parks. You'll not want to assume much of anything wild lives on those lands but a few bunnies, deer and the occasional dove plot. Those areas serve the folks that don't expect much, don't get much, and don't want to scout or travel past 35 miles to hunt. THAT's the majority - thankfuilly.

That's also the group that will swear their ain't much game around. Like most things to be successful in Ohio and other places it takes time and effort. Whether ducks, pheasant, rabbit or deer, it's all the same. That's why bird farms stay booked - people want to drive 45 minutes and shoot 9 birds over Rover.

Pretty close to my sentiments. The PF rep mentioned is a member of this site but i won't name handles. Pheasant don't travel 75 miles from being released to land in small public grounds filled with the right habitat. And as stated below - it's not the purpose of public release.

http://www.cleveland.com/outdoors/index ... ith_p.html
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Re: Dog bell

Postby ScaupHunter » Fri Mar 14, 2014 9:37 am

Botiz630 wrote:
HNTFSH wrote:
OHIODUCKA5 wrote:HNT, I don't know what part of the state you are in , but there isn't a wild pheasant in the 5 counties I hunt on public or private land. They release a bunch, the ones that dont get shot end up as coyote food.


That's a shame. I have birds within 15 of minutes of my house and in at least 7 counties we hunt. Some huntable, some not. I imagine t_Baker sees them as well. Have two on the Farm I hunt and hear the crows on the protected wetland it boarders. Honestly - anyone who tells me Ohio doesn't have a Pheasant population clearly isn't a true pheasant hunter. Or at least doesn't have the dog, faith, or time to pursue it.

Or maybe draws on their experiences only from 30 years ago which is hardly informed input. I've been here since 69 and remember the very thin days. Takes years, outings, work, and dog to be successful. People have a better chance of shooting a pen released bird on private or outlaying public ground in South Dakota.


I'll say I've heard them cackling while on property nowhere near public hunting ground.


Release sites are often a joke. I have seen guys release birds right from the road into an open field. The birds look around and fly to the brushy non-hunting area immediately. Lets just say we have a lot of very fat coyotes around all the planting sites.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Botiz630 » Fri Mar 14, 2014 10:56 am

ScaupHunter wrote:
Botiz630 wrote:
HNTFSH wrote:
OHIODUCKA5 wrote:HNT, I don't know what part of the state you are in , but there isn't a wild pheasant in the 5 counties I hunt on public or private land. They release a bunch, the ones that dont get shot end up as coyote food.


That's a shame. I have birds within 15 of minutes of my house and in at least 7 counties we hunt. Some huntable, some not. I imagine t_Baker sees them as well. Have two on the Farm I hunt and hear the crows on the protected wetland it boarders. Honestly - anyone who tells me Ohio doesn't have a Pheasant population clearly isn't a true pheasant hunter. Or at least doesn't have the dog, faith, or time to pursue it.

Or maybe draws on their experiences only from 30 years ago which is hardly informed input. I've been here since 69 and remember the very thin days. Takes years, outings, work, and dog to be successful. People have a better chance of shooting a pen released bird on private or outlaying public ground in South Dakota.


I'll say I've heard them cackling while on property nowhere near public hunting ground.


Release sites are often a joke. I have seen guys release birds right from the road into an open field. The birds look around and fly to the brushy non-hunting area immediately. Lets just say we have a lot of very fat coyotes around all the planting sites.


I'm talking many, many miles from any of the release sites.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby ScaupHunter » Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:16 am

I know what you were saying. we used to have a good population of self sustaining pheasant in Eastern Washington. A few bad winters and over hunting took care of those. We still have good quail numbers and Chukar in some areas. Ask anyone who hunts in Washington and you will hear about the good old days of Pheasant hunting and how they are gone.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Rick Hall » Fri Mar 14, 2014 1:40 pm

Hate to hear that. Back when I was serious about pheasants in the '60s and '70s, Eastern Washington was one of the places we dreamed of hunting.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby HNTFSH » Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:06 pm

I've heard pretty decent things about the State, bird hunting and wild population. Can't speak to public lands but hear the private managed ground is pretty productive for pheasant and ducks.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby ScaupHunter » Sat Mar 15, 2014 6:05 pm

It is a hunting paradise and some areas are still very productive. Pheasants are down, other birds are thriving.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Tanner01 » Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:50 pm

Anyone use a bell while hunting upland. I have a tiny brittany and I loose sight of him all the time while hunting in tall sage. He is a big runner for a brittany and I can't always tell if he is on point or just running in tall grass sage or behind rocks. I feel like his neck is really small in diameter and may not accommodate an e collar and beeper. Plus a bell is only a few bucks. Anyone's experience with this or suggestions is appreciated. Thank you.


I used a bell while huting grouse. I actually checked the tone of each one at the store untill I got the tone I enjoyed. :smile:
My GSP was out of site often, between range and thick woods. When the bell stopped it was part of the fun to go find her.

I could watch pointers hunting in tall grass all day long, and IMO, a soft bell is almost a joy.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Labs » Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:50 am

FLT MEDIC wrote:Well thanks for the info. Seems split on whether a bell is fine or not. I guess I will form my own opinion training and next season. I've only hunted pheasant in nd, sd, and Washington state and it was on private property so I can't help with the "debate." I live in NV and me and my brittany hunt chukar. Thanks everyone!


FLT MEDIC - Take this for what it is...first hand account of guys running French britts on pheasants in SD. I guided a group of four. The had 3 dogs, very small dogs and big runners....in the taller cover, they vanished...and they all had bells on them. The hunters were also very loud with the whistling, and constant bell ringing. I let them hunt with their dogs for the first 1/2 of the day, and they had three birds to show for it...after lunch, I alternated my two labs in with the group, no bells, and I don't use my whistle much in the field...I recall my dogs with the tone feature on the collar to keep them in range. We ended up with 20 birds in the second half day of hunting. There were birds flushing wild at the end of the fields, and the ones that my dogs flushed, and were killed, were no doubt doubling back around all that noise.

Chukars are running little bastards too...

You can do what you want, but if you want to be successful on running birds....I would do it sans a bell...
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Rick Hall » Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:56 am

So is that example meaningful because you were also very loud and whistling, and the bells were the only difference?
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Labs » Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:04 am

Rick Hall wrote:So is that example meaningful because you were also very loud and whistling, and the bells were the only difference?


More noise = Less birds...whether its whistling, yelling at your dog, or bells...

but, if your hunting planted, pen raised birds, by all means...hollar away. :wink:
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Re: Dog bell

Postby HNTFSH » Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:12 am

Labs wrote:
but, if your hunting planted, pen raised birds, by all means...hollar away. :wink:


Seems to be quite common. I've talked to many a local who consider it quite the hunt. Hell, some confuse real hunting with release farms. Amazed you can shoot more than two or even shoot a hen. Especially those that don't believe there are any wild ones left. More power to the put and take crowd.

I agree - pen raised take far less considerations to shoot. IMO makes great training though.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Rick Hall » Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:46 am

Labs wrote:
Rick Hall wrote:So is that example meaningful because you were also very loud and whistling, and the bells were the only difference?


More noise = Less birds...whether its whistling, yelling at your dog, or bells...

but, if your hunting planted, pen raised birds, by all means...hollar away. :wink:


I missed the part where anyone suggested hollering - or anything else one can do without that associates the threat of a four-legged predator with man.

Birds hide, rather than run, from predators that seem likely to pass up their hide with generally good success unless there's a man along to change the game. As long as that course seems to be working, they're apt to stick with it. Let a dog try to move in on the bird or road one that is moving, like a natural predator that has its location pegged would, and it's apt to move. A staunch pointing dog that isn't crowding its game allows it to think hiding is working, and it's moving that could prove dangerous. Again, though, only until man enters the picture. Having been an avid bow hunter has allowed me to watch feeding Appalachian ruffed grouse flush away from a distant man's voice, once at what I'm pretty certain was a quarter mile away. So I became pretty fanatical about voice commands and substituted a bird-like "ep" for "whoa" or "sit" and bleating "nee" for release or turn.

Of course some birds are also going to come to associate whistles, bells, beepers and who knows what all with hunters, but if a pointing dog is going to range in any kind of cover at all at a distance from his man that allows the instinct that gives him that name to work to greatest advantage, some sort of locator is probably going to be needed to keep his man from feeling the need to make his own presence more obvious. Though I've no experience with them, I'd think an expensive GPS tracking collar the most ideal solution, but the OP has already suggested that a remote controlled beeper costs more than he wishes to spend, which leaves a cheaper beeper without remote or bell as his only practical options.

In any event, I'd like to think the OP and his Brittany will experiment and learn what works for them in their situation.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby HNTFSH » Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:03 am

Rick Hall wrote:Birds hide, rather than run, from predators that seem likely to pass up their hide with generally good success unless there's a man along to change the game. As long as that course seems to be working, they're apt to stick with it.


That's why I ask the dog to do the smelling, not me.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Rick Hall » Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:42 am

Ohh-kaay.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby gonehuntin' » Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:37 am

For what it's worth, I've run all three, bell, beeper, Astro. No contest. Astro. Quiet, shows exact location and distance of dog, doubles as a great gps especially with a topo chip. Best invention in many a moon. I'm on my second one now.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Labs » Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:43 am

Based on the birds we encounter in SD...their tendency is to run first, then fly. Will you harvest a few that stick tight? Yep, there will be a few dumb ones. You will be more successful if you are quiet...as far as dogs that run big...the wiley rooster typically runs circles around those dogs...that's why most of the guides running pointers keep them close...because if you don't, bird run to the end of the cover and bust out of range of any hunter...I stand by my earlier assessment...more noise = less birds, be it a whistle, bell, whatever...
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Re: Dog bell

Postby Labs » Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:44 am

gonehuntin' wrote:For what it's worth, I've run all three, bell, beeper, Astro. No contest. Astro. Quiet, shows exact location and distance of dog, doubles as a great gps especially with a topo chip. Best invention in many a moon. I'm on my second one now.


Exactly...quiet is the key.
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Re: Dog bell

Postby gonehuntin' » Tue Mar 18, 2014 4:46 pm

Labs wrote:
gonehuntin' wrote:For what it's worth, I've run all three, bell, beeper, Astro. No contest. Astro. Quiet, shows exact location and distance of dog, doubles as a great gps especially with a topo chip. Best invention in many a moon. I'm on my second one now.


Exactly...quiet is the key.



I have hunted SD for more years than I care to admit. if there is a wily, spooky bird, it's a SD rooster in Nov. or Dec. Close the truck door too loud and you'll have roosters blowing out of a swamp 100 yards away. At the sound of a crunching cat tail, bell, or beeper the marsh will erupt in birds. Ya hunt em' like deer; silent and slow. If you have to yell at your mutt or blow the whistle, you're screwed. I wouldn't have it any other way.
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