Need Help!!! Gunner's Needs a Pro Trainer in the K.C. Area!!

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Need Help!!! Gunner's Needs a Pro Trainer in the K.C. Area!!

Postby KSGunner » Tue Jul 12, 2005 9:43 am

It's a long story, but Gunner needs a trainer in the KC area. He is a 9 month old yellow lab. He is obedience trained, collar conditioned, does marked land and water retrieves and is working on force fetch.

I need someone who is a gentle trainer to finish the force fetch and maybe more. If Gunner is pushed hard, he shuts down. If it is fun for him, he will go for a long time with huge enthusiasm.

Does anyone know of a trainer that is good, fair and loves dogs in the Kansas City area?

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Postby harvey1b » Tue Jul 12, 2005 11:15 am

I can't help with the KC pro trainer, but it sounds like you are doing well with the dog yourself.
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Postby KSGunner » Tue Jul 12, 2005 11:19 am

Not really, I did some of the basic obedience work and a trainer has done the rest. The trainer is moving to N.C. on Wednesday and I need help with training the force fetch training. I do not know anything about force fetch training. Gunner is about half way into this and needs a pro to finish it.
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Postby harvey1b » Tue Jul 12, 2005 11:33 am

come on! have some faith in yourself! you can do it. it takes 1/2 hr every evening. you can do that, but you may have to miss your favorite show or baseball game once in awhile.

get yourself a training video and it will show you how its' done. It really isn't that hard. If you have questions on the way just ask. I started training my pup last summer. She's the first dog I've ever trained. She is just over a year now and is force fetched, does marked retreives well, and is starting on doubles. She's not perfect, but she's my dog.

I think you should give it a try. You'll have more confidence in the dog and an understanding of the dog and it's capabilities in the field this fall. The dog will develop a strong bond and relationship with you and not the trainer. Besides, it's a whole lot cooler having a hunting dog you trained yourself. That really makes it YOUR dog.

-Matt
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Postby KSGunner » Tue Jul 12, 2005 1:01 pm

Okay, okay, I will give it a go!

How did you train force fetch?

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Postby adquack » Tue Jul 12, 2005 4:26 pm

if you do decide you need help I've heard real good things about Graham Sharp

link is www.sharpretrievers.com (i think)

He'd be an hour or two south of KCK
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Postby harvey1b » Tue Jul 12, 2005 4:54 pm

There are a multitude of references available. I used the Richard Wolters "Water Dog" DVD. Just make sure you watch the video a couple of times, and then the force fetch section 5-10 times so you know exactly where you are going with it. The final advice I have is to take your time. For example, make sure your pup is very good at fetch with a toe pinch before moving to the ear pinch, excellent at the side to side before you are walking up and down the table. You'll see what I mean when you get the video.

Good luck with it. You'll have a lot of fun and get to know your dog a lot better in the process.
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Postby bullet » Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:51 pm

http://www.dobbsdogs.com/library/retrie ... part1.html
I'm not going to tell you to train your dog or not, thats entirely up to you but if you decide to here are some helpful hints from Dobbs. He calls it forced retrieve. Big key to his training is the table. Toe hitch is a thing of the past. Ear pinch, collar in that order. Introduce the collar when the ear pinch is working. At a point you'll use them both. Be patient, the ear will become sore after a few sessions and he or she will begin to respond more quickly. No disrespect to harvey1b but Wolters was a good writer for Sports Illustrated,and wrote a good book but was never a trainer. ex Carr's disciples, Lardy dahl and others are the way to go. I'd go with the "Ten minute retriever". Again no disrespect to anyone just my opinion
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Postby ACEBLDRS » Tue Jul 12, 2005 6:42 pm

If you decide you want a pro in your area. Go to this chat site www.retrievertraining.net There are a lot of pro's that post on there. If you posted the same question there. You would probably get 5 people in about a day.

But have some faith in yourself. A good dog takes either time or money. Luckily i have the time. because the later is insufficiant. :toofunny:
.....you've got to ask yourself a question: 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do ya, punk?

Dirty Harry

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Postby gsphunter » Tue Jul 12, 2005 8:30 pm

Good call there KSGUNNER. It always feels better training your own dog, rather than just seeing the results. You'll appreciate it so much more if you do it yourself.

I'd start by talking to your trainer. He knows where the dog is, and what method he has started with. Stick with whatever he is using if it is working.

If I'd disagree with anything harvey said, it would be that it takes 1/2 hour each day. You don't even need that. 15 minutes is plenty. It may take a little longer in the long run, but I think shorter lessons work better.

Checkout Evan Graham's book. It's called Smartfetch. I thought it was great. But like I said, talk to your trainer. It sounds like you have spent alot of money with him, so he shouldn't have a problem giving you some guidelines.

Ask specific questions on here along the way. I know enough on the topic to get you through it, and I know many others do as well. In closing I would give the advice to demand perfection during FF, because this is the ground work for all retrieving and you are taking the time to do it right, so you might as well get the benefits.
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Postby bullet » Tue Jul 12, 2005 8:52 pm

I agree,find out exactly where he left off. He owes you that.
Smartfetch and the Smartwork series are great books. SmartFetch putting emphasis on FF
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