Out of the norm gear in your trailer

A place to talk about decoy trailer setups and ideas.

Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby Boomstck63 » Tue Apr 30, 2013 3:26 pm

Hey guys I know the normal things everyone packs into your trailers, rakes, shovels, blinds, decoys. What other things are you guys putting in your trailers that help out while in the field? I'm heading to Canada in the fall and I want to be prepared for everything thrown our way. Anything out of the ordinary?
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby Hunter MN » Tue May 07, 2013 9:39 pm

Maybe a stake hole-punch depending on the type of decoys you use
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby platinumwindow99 » Fri May 10, 2013 5:00 pm

Small Generator
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby War Wagon » Sat May 11, 2013 5:19 am

Like this ? How about a leaf blower to clean out the trailer
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby tenfingergrip » Thu May 16, 2013 12:31 pm

Broomstck,
Don't know your age, but I'm getting a little long in the tooth, so about 6 years ago I got tired of having to do the long walk back to the blinds to field hunt after setting up all the dekes and then having to hike back to pick up the truck and trailer to load up. By the time I got back to the spread, I was worn out from walking and usually sweating like a stuck pig. Then I froze when I laid down in the layout or got stationary in the field blind. To cure this problem, I purchased a small motorcycle for about $300 bucks and mounted a wheel chock inside the trailer to hold the cycle. After we set up the dekes/blinds, I take the trailer out of the field and hide the truck and trailer, remove the minicycle and motor back to the blind. I carry a burlap sheet and camo cover bungeed to the cycle to cover it while we're hunting. After the hunt, I motor back, put the minicycle back in its rack and drive the truck and trailer back to the field to load up the blinds, dekes and varmits we've killed. Saved my old arse for a few more years of hunting. Don't have a pic of the setup in the trailer, but here I am going back to pick up the truck.

Back to pick up the trailer and truck.... click to enlarge
Minicycle back to truck.jpg


click to enlarge
PICT3003.1.jpg
Last edited by tenfingergrip on Sun May 25, 2014 6:24 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby BKScripto » Thu May 16, 2013 12:35 pm

^^^ That is pretty badass! Better than taking another truck and trailer with a UTV!
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby War Wagon » Thu May 16, 2013 4:54 pm

... tenfingergrip...
Dam I like that idea !!! :clapping: Something else to buy before Sept...... :yes:
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby tenfingergrip » Fri May 17, 2013 6:01 am

Another plus on using the minicycle is that it gets me back to the spread before the shooting starts. Can't tell you how many times, pre-cycle, when I was hoofing it back, a hundred yards or so from the spread, I'd hear "get down, get down, here they come!" and I'd be laying on my belly in the middle of a barley or pea field, no gun, while my "buddies" would have half their limits before I heard "OK, come on, quick!" :mad:

Here's a 'not so good' pic of the cycle and how it's mounted in the front part of the trailer with a wheel chock bolted to the far wall. I have a five foot, 5" wide hardwood board with a small piece of 1" angle iron bolted to the end of the board that hooks over the entrance to roll the bike in and out. Loads and unloads very easily. I had a narrower tire'd cycle for a couple of years, but this wide tire model, a Baja Heat, gives much better service, especially in/across the furrows of the fields in Sask. (Tractor Supply sells them new)

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Mini cycle mount.jpg
Last edited by tenfingergrip on Mon Jun 10, 2013 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby tenfingergrip » Mon Jun 10, 2013 1:59 pm

Reflectors.
Here's another 'out of the norm' item we carry in the goose trailer for our convenience in finding the "X" before light when Canada hunting in Sask.
I had been using these and this first method for 20 some years prior to aquiring my first handheld GPS and I must say, it's still as reliable as the new-fangled technology. Unfortunately, if it's real foggy, you may be SOL! They are still extremely handy for this and many uses.

These are some of those reflector rods I made up out of 8' fiberglass rods, some foam pipe insulation and some DOT reflector tape. Some of these, on the left, are over 25 years old and still being used. The DOT tape is extremely bright reflecting. This method may be old hat to some and is really common sense, but younger, inexperienced hunters may find it helpful.

The old pre-GPS method, my Reflector Triangulation method, became necessary years ago, when we would spot a flock of geese feeding in a quarter section (160 acres) field during the day (morning or afternoon) and would need to mark that spot. Since the geese were still in the field and we didn't want to spook them, I used 4 reflectors to triangulate the location of the flock. By placing a reflector on the edge of the road, 90 degrees opposite the flock and then walking another reflector out into the field opposite/away, a hundred yds or so, and placing it on a direct line with the geese and the other reflector, I had a straight line between all three. I did the exact same thing on/off the road perpendicular to the first road. Then in the early morning hours, we would drive into the field, parallel to the road til we got to the first set of reflectors, turn 90 degrees so we were driving directly away from the two in alignment and drive with our spotlight shining toward the opposing two. When those opposing two were aligned, we would check back behind to assure the first two were still aligned and we were always standing in goose poop. (A compass was handy to have so we could run out directly perpendicular to the road.)

If, by chance, we were fortunate and were able to "put the geese to bed" the afternoon before, we would have driven into the field that afternoon after they had finished feeding and simply placed a reflector on the "X/goose poop" so we could drive directly to the "X" next morning and not need to use the road reflectors.

For those unfamiliar or unaware, the roads in Sask are laid out in grids, normally 1 mile apart from E. to W. and 2 miles apart from N. to S.. Land is owned by the quarter section (1/2 mile X 1/2 mile = 160 acres) so with that set-up with the roads, an owner can always access their quarter from a road. All roads run directly N/S and E/W with a few exceptions. The two sets of roads (N/S and E/W) enclose two sections (640 acres each) or 1280 acres.

The latest method for acquiring the "X" is to mark a waypoint with the GPS at the same location where I used to put the reflectors, a second waypoint at the corner of the two roads and a third waypoint where I used to put the 2nd set of reflectors. The GPS allows me to PROJECT A Location for the "X" by knowing the distance (from waypoint 1 to the corner) and the DIRECTION (180 degrees in this example) away from waypoint 2 (from the north road). The GPS will set for you the coordinates of the center of the flock (projected point) and you can just follow to it the next morning (or late that afternoon and place you reflector)
Clear as mud, right? It's really pretty easy once you do it a couple of times. I've been taking my laptop with me the last couple of years and projecting it on the laptop aerials which confirms the earlier gps points if you hadn't had a chance to put 'em to bed.
(edit...by the way, if you have a computer with you, there is a website (many) with app that will give you the projected coordinates if you have the direction and distance from a set of coordinates):
http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/find-terminal-coordinates-given-bearing-and-distance

"X" Reflectors Click to enlarge
Reflectors 002.1.jpg

Click to enlarge
Reflector triangulation method1.jpg

Click to enlarge
GPS method.jpg
Last edited by tenfingergrip on Fri Jun 21, 2013 7:38 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby Boomstck63 » Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:56 pm

tenfingergrip

I really appreciate the information and yes I'm young only 23. The oldest guy going to Canada with us is 26 and it's a first for all of us. What you have told me so far will be used greatly. If you don't mind sharing some more information you can email me which would be great. My email is gremaudbrent@yahoo.com we will definitely need some pointers on things.
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby tenfingergrip » Fri Jun 21, 2013 7:40 am

Boomstck63 wrote:tenfingergrip

I really appreciate the information and yes I'm young only 23. The oldest guy going to Canada with us is 26 and it's a first for all of us. What you have told me so far will be used greatly. If you don't mind sharing some more information you can email me which would be great. My email is gremaudbrent@yahoo.com we will definitely need some pointers on things.


Sent you a note.
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby elfros » Sat Jul 27, 2013 11:23 am

not for the decoy anal guys but to get your full bodies out quick and pick up fast get as many bulk seed bags you can get at least 15 bigfoots one guy pulls bag and the other sets them very efficient way for quick decoy placement
the bags are white and if you hunt snow they make a nice place to crawl in to hunt
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Re: Out of the norm gear in your trailer

Postby tenfingergrip » Sun Aug 18, 2013 9:14 am

Not a trailer gear item, but has come in handy for 30 years on the trip to Canada. Mounted a container (old military parts container bottom) to the roof of the van/suburban to toss the birds in so as not to get blood in the van or trailer. Cut two horizontal slots in the two walls at the sides' bottom to run a ratchet strap thru and tighten down as well as hooking the two handles with ratchet straps to the rail drip rails.

Also comes in handy for tossing a bag of decoys or marsh stools into. I drilled holes in the top four corners to hook and crisscross two rubber bungees to keep decoys, etc from flying out. Also drilled two hols in the back bottom corners to let any rainwater out. Glued a piece of rubber fatigue mat to the bottom to keep from scratching the roof. Very handy item.

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rooftop carrier.jpg
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