Processing patterns using Photoshop

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Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby Bug Doc » Tue Oct 22, 2013 4:23 am

I've received a few PM's regarding how I create my patterns. Here are step-by-step instructions.

I start with a picture of the pattern sheet.

Image

Years ago I set up a black background in my garage with 30" marked off above it to get better images, but now I just use the higher resolution camera on my iPhone to shoot pics right on the pattern board.

Next, in a separate layer, I draw in dots over the pellet hits.

Image

Using the elliptical marquee tool, I draw in a circle, using the hash marks on the wall to ensure it's 30" in dia.

Image

I then drop in a pre-prepared image of a duck, setting the opacity to about 40%.

Image

Final steps are to type in the information, delete the original background photo, and set a white background.

Image
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby lostknife4 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 7:21 am

Well done, first class !!!!
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby TexasGeese » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:17 am

Good write up. The only thing I would change, and I've played around a little with it for some of the ones I've done, but that's to pick the dot size that accurately matches the pellets diameter. As an example, patterning a #4 steel shot pellet and then using a digital dot with the diameter of 000 Buckshot is a little misleading in my opinion.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby lostknife4 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:34 am

Not in my opinion, the dot sized used is just an easy to view location of the place the shot was at the time, if you were using a large goose picture and #9 TSS you wouldn't be able to see the hole location if relative sizes were used. It's shot placement that is of concern not relative shot size.
It's still first class.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby TexasGeese » Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:08 am

lostknife4 wrote:Not in my opinion, the dot sized used is just an easy to view location of the place the shot was at the time, if you were using a large goose picture and #9 TSS you wouldn't be able to see the hole location if relative sizes were used. It's shot placement that is of concern not relative shot size.
It's still first class.
Lost


I disagree, it is of concern when the dot sized used is so extensive that it adds the perception of density to a pattern. Holes or blotches in the pattern are not accurately represented. If the dot's were scaled back about two sizes in the examples above I think it would provide a better representation.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby lostknife4 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:24 am

Well I guess we will have to agree to disagree, your perception of the interpretation of pattern density is different from mine.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby TexasGeese » Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:25 am

Here's one I did awhile back with #6 shot. I did use a larger dot size, I do not think it added anything to the pattern. The sizes in the example that Bug Doc used seemed excessively large to me.

Image
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby lostknife4 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:30 am

I like Bug Doc's representation better.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby TexasGeese » Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:48 am

here's one I did with TSS #9.5's.

Image
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby hillbilly.. » Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:04 am

TexasGeese wrote:Here's one I did awhile back with #6 shot. I did use a larger dot size, I do not think it added anything to the pattern. The sizes in the example that Bug Doc used seemed excessively large to me.

Image



6shot outa a 10g.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby BBK » Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:18 am

hillbilly.. wrote:
TexasGeese wrote:Here's one I did awhile back with #6 shot. I did use a larger dot size, I do not think it added anything to the pattern. The sizes in the example that Bug Doc used seemed excessively large to me.

Image



6shot outa a 10g.



Hell of a duck load!
Why do I shoot 3.5" for geese? Because they don't make a 4" yet!
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby Bug Doc » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:39 am

I've used various sizes of dots over the years. I can see where it might make a difference if someone is just trying to 'eyeball' the pattern, but personally I am more concerned with the actual number of hits and their overall distribution. I sometimes don't even get the duck sized correctly (in this example the pintail is actually quite a bit smaller than in real life), but since I don't use it in my analysis it doesn't matter. Dot size is simply a personal preference; there's no right or wrong answer here.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby lostknife4 » Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:28 pm

TexasGeese wrote:here's one I did with TSS #9.5's.

Image


No holes in that pattern, LOL
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby Jim Atlas » Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:50 pm

I'd say one big hole. Even better.
It's only sky busting if you miss...
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby BT Justice » Wed Oct 23, 2013 2:49 am

TexasGeese wrote:Here's one I did awhile back with #6 shot. I did use a larger dot size, I do not think it added anything to the pattern. The sizes in the example that Bug Doc used seemed excessively large to me.


Go up to #4 shot and you might have better results, that pattern looks like it's blown at 40 yards. Ithaca fixed chokes on the Mag 10 usually run about .721 -723 constriction, they are finicky about what they shoot sometimes. With the .720 Terror in my Gold 10 , I get 67-71% patterns at 50 yards with #6 lead, Tungsten shot should pattern tighter than that.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby TexasGeese » Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:07 am

lostknife4 wrote:No holes in that pattern, LOL
Lost


haha, I thought you would like that. :thumbsup:

BT Justice wrote:Go up to #4 shot and you might have better results, that pattern looks like it's blown at 40 yards. Ithaca fixed chokes on the Mag 10 usually run about .721 -723 constriction, they are finicky about what they shoot sometimes. With the .720 Terror in my Gold 10 , I get 67-71% patterns at 50 yards with #6 lead, Tungsten shot should pattern tighter than that.


Personally, I wish I could open it up even more. I like having some wiggle room for fast moving waterfowl, rather than trying to punch a hole the size of a paper plate. I don't trust #6's past 40yds anyways. I've shot some geese with the #4 fed polymer and was really impressed. I wish I had bought more before they discontinued it.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby TexasGeese » Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:16 am

I probably posted these before, but here are some other Mag 10 patterns I have. I recently sent the gun off to have some barrel and action work done. Lengthened the forcing cone and opened it up to a LM. I'm hoping to do some patterning this weekend.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby BT Justice » Thu Oct 24, 2013 5:39 am

TexasGeese wrote:I probably posted these before, but here are some other Mag 10 patterns I have. I recently sent the gun off to have some barrel and action work done. Lengthened the forcing cone and opened it up to a LM. I'm hoping to do some patterning this weekend.


Image

I'm not going to comment on the Hevi or TSS patterns they all look good( I do like the #4 Hevi pattern), the steel shot patterns tell the same story as patterns did with my Mag-10, they pattern steel BB's very well.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby hillbilly.. » Fri Oct 25, 2013 10:47 am

how do you know if you actually aimin at the dead center of paper if you don have a circle to shoot at on the paper??
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby BT Justice » Fri Oct 25, 2013 11:41 am

hillbilly.. wrote:how do you know if you actually aimin at the dead center of paper if you don have a circle to shoot at on the paper??

You don't aim a shotgun, you point it at your intended target. This is why you wait till after you shoot to put in the 30" circle, you draw the circle around the densest part of the pattern which is not always dead center of the paper.
Also why many of us pattern at 40 yards, much easier to center a pattern than at 50 or 60 yards. Believe me it's frustrating sometimes when you have to make two or three goes at it to get a decent pattern on paper, I admit to it though... :lol3:
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby BBK » Fri Oct 25, 2013 11:56 am

hillbilly.. wrote:how do you know if you actually aimin at the dead center of paper if you don have a circle to shoot at on the paper??


You could put a dot on there if you need something to aim at. But you pattern a shotgun WITHOUT the circle being drawn. You are judging the pattern here, not the POI.

That is how the fellas get the 50% patterns when patterning, they draw a circle and then miss dead center.
Why do I shoot 3.5" for geese? Because they don't make a 4" yet!
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby hillbilly.. » Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:08 pm

BT Justice wrote:
hillbilly.. wrote:how do you know if you actually aimin at the dead center of paper if you don have a circle to shoot at on the paper??

You don't aim a shotgun, you point it at your intended target. This is why you wait till after you shoot to put in the 30" circle, you draw the circle around the densest part of the pattern which is not always dead center of the paper.
Also why many of us pattern at 40 yards, much easier to center a pattern than at 50 or 60 yards. Believe me it's frustrating sometimes when you have to make two or three goes at it to get a decent pattern on paper, I admit to it though... :lol3:



ok then how do you know your pointing at the center of the target. just because you hit the paper don't mean that it didn't drop 10" at 50yrds. I dnt know what the drop actually is I was just usin that as an example. not stirin pot just tryin to figure out answers from so many people with all different answers.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby BT Justice » Mon Oct 28, 2013 3:10 am

Like I stated you do the best you can, an orange dot in the center helps a lot.
I don't claim to get it right all the time, and like I stated it sometimes takes two or three patterns shot on paper before I deem one acceptable to draw the circle and count.
I don't know what a lot of these others guys do.
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Re: Processing patterns using Photoshop

Postby lostknife4 » Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:26 am

hillbilly.. wrote:
BT Justice wrote:
hillbilly.. wrote:how do you know if you actually aimin at the dead center of paper if you don have a circle to shoot at on the paper??

You don't aim a shotgun, you point it at your intended target. This is why you wait till after you shoot to put in the 30" circle, you draw the circle around the densest part of the pattern which is not always dead center of the paper.
Also why many of us pattern at 40 yards, much easier to center a pattern than at 50 or 60 yards. Believe me it's frustrating sometimes when you have to make two or three goes at it to get a decent pattern on paper, I admit to it though... :lol3:



ok then how do you know your pointing at the center of the target. just because you hit the paper don't mean that it didn't drop 10" at 50yrds. I dnt know what the drop actually is I was just usin that as an example. not stirin pot just tryin to figure out answers from so many people with all different answers.



Certainly drop is a factor but shooting patterns is not at all like rifle shooting and even then a group no matter where it is on the target is shot for grouping not necessarily POA, in fact it's sometimes better not to have a ragged hole to try to guess the centre of, but sight it in to shoot at some other very specifically defined "point" on the target and leave the aiming point well defined, that is if you are shooting for grouping IMHO. With the shotgun you will naturally want to shoot at the POA, usually some point identified some how as the point you are "aiming" at, and that may or may not be the POI however the main purpose of the exercise is to establish the pattern, the POI and POA will be adjusted for after the centre of the pattern has been established. This will account for gun fit, shot drop etc. Pattern first then adjust everthing else afterward.
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