Junior Hunts a good idea?

Duck hunting in California topics include: California duck hunting trips, the past hunting seasons, and share information about California duck hunting guides.

Moderators: #1wingnut, duckman2000, PinTeal, finsnfeathershunter

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Noobhunter » Tue Jan 28, 2014 4:33 pm

Sgtstadanko707 wrote:Did you just say minecraft. Man I am older and that was before my time. Lol


Minecraft is huge , especially the apps for phones and tablets. The kids will play for hours and then bore the hell out of you showing you their creations. Our elementary school costume parade last year had a lot of kids dressed up as the minecraft man, you know its popular then.
Noobhunter
hunter
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:50 am
Location: Lafayette,ca


Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby slowshooter » Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:19 pm

Joking aside there are pluses and minuses to the junior hunts.

Minuses:
1. Some Dad's won't take their kid out during the regular season because they don't want the kid getting in the way of their duck number goals. So they use the Junior hunts as the way to bleed off the guilt and assuage the wife. The kids know who does this and eventually they will hate you Dad. They'll love you even less when they figure out later that you've used them to get reservations.

2. Some kids don't want to go on a kiddie hunt. They want to hunt with the adults because they want to be part of the camaraderie that comes from days in the blind with buddies. Relegated to junior hunts some kids will just turn away from hunting because having that experience handed to them - taints any experience going forward. Some kids understand better than adults that feeling entitled to something simply because you happen to be black, brown, white or young isn't right. A great day of shooting as a kid followed by having to work for them the instant your birthday hits? Time to go play World of Wonder or Minecraft and talk to other girls/boys online.

3. Are the hunts more about the kids or are they about self gratification for those that put them on - and the organizations that support them? At this point there is zero evidence that the Junior hunts are growing the number of hunters. How is that possible? Because they are only held for kids that already have their licenses. The numbers are there before the event is even held. Who is going to say that the only reason their kid is a hunter is because the junior hunts are held? See above.

The Pluses:
1. For every junior hunter that figures out that Dad is a d-bag, there are those kids whose Dads do more than just take them out to the junior hunt. Those are the kids that just love to hunt and aren't going to think about what it means to have a hunt of their own or how it's tainted… They just want to go... That does beg the question: If they love it so much why do they need the Junior hunts?

2. The answer to the question above is simple. People suck. There are enough guys out there that crowd, shoot high, curse, smoke and otherwise act like idiots in front of kids, that the junior hunt allows the parents that crowd, shoot high, curse, smoke and otherwise act like idiots in front of kids, to complain about the other guys that crowd, shoot high, curse, smoke and otherwise act like idiots in front of kids - without their own kids being the wiser.

3. Since the DFG can't enforce to the degree to keep idiot from being idiots, the Junior hunts keep the kids from seeing the worst of the adults. On the other hand, if more kids and women were out there from day to day, likely a lot of idiots would probably behave because they wouldn't want an angry parent caving their face in... Or have the word get around with the fairer sex that out in the field the guy everyone thought was cool is actually a d!ckless wonder that crowds and shoots high, curses, smokes and otherwise acts like an idiot in front of kids.

It seems to me that we tell ourselves that we hold a Junior Hunt to make it easy for the kids, when all we're doing is making it easier for the adults to pay lip service to creating a new generation of hunters..

Mudhen hit it when he said that every day is a junior hunt day.
Last edited by slowshooter on Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
All this for a bowl of borscht.
User avatar
slowshooter
hunter
 
Posts: 9011
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:44 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby PaulyQuackers » Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:19 pm

quack-attack wrote:I have been taking both my kids duck hunting since they were 3, including to refuges. The jet sled is great for this. Before they had waders I would drag them out to an island or blind, in their little "boat" as they called it. I get really annoyed when I hear someone with a kid say "I cannot wait until my kid can go with me." What the hell are you waiting for? If you do not get them involved at an early age you will lose the battle to xbox, nintendo..etc. I hate that kids would rather stay home and play minecraft than go out in the field. Sure you give up some opportunities, You may not get to go as far as you would normally go or hunt as long as you normally would. Heck i used to take my son pheasant hunting and I used the jogger stroller. a hen spoonie with my kids is worth a stringer of greenheads by myself.


My duck hunting buddy used to take his kid out with us on the lake when he was just a little tike. I noticed he didn't like it when we shot, and never wanted to stay out there for any length of time, and was miserable when it rained, but he would cry when we didn't take him, so we felt bad leaving him home. Funny, they both stopped hunting ducks when he outgrew the youth hunt. I'd have to hijack my kids from my wife to get them in the field with me, but I don't see the logic in taking a 3 year old duck hunting anyway. I prefer to have them grow up a little before they have to sit in the middle of a shooting gallery, because there are way better options than just hunting and video games for them to do. They won't even remember it at that age, anyway. That's just the way I feel. I have never ever seen a toddler at a refuge before, probably for good reason.
User avatar
PaulyQuackers
hunter
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:16 pm
Location: Fresno, California

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby slowshooter » Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:24 pm

Noobhunter wrote:
Sgtstadanko707 wrote:Did you just say minecraft. Man I am older and that was before my time. Lol


Minecraft is huge , especially the apps for phones and tablets. The kids will play for hours and then bore the hell out of you showing you their creations. Our elementary school costume parade last year had a lot of kids dressed up as the minecraft man, you know its popular then.


LOL. I love looking at what the kids make. Some of that stuff is outstanding.
All this for a bowl of borscht.
User avatar
slowshooter
hunter
 
Posts: 9011
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:44 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Noobhunter » Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:48 pm

slowshooter wrote: They'll love you even less when they figure out later that you've used them to get reservations.


LOL, my daughter goes on most hunts with me but there have been many CWA hunts and ressis that I used her to get. She doesn't resent it but she knows how to use it against me. If I try to discipline her she threatens me that she won't go on the hunt.
Noobhunter
hunter
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:50 am
Location: Lafayette,ca

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby slowshooter » Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:53 pm

Noobhunter wrote:
slowshooter wrote: They'll love you even less when they figure out later that you've used them to get reservations.


LOL, my daughter goes on most hunts with me but there have been many CWA hunts and ressis that I used her to get. She doesn't resent it but she knows how to use it against me. If I try to discipline her she threatens me that she won't go on the hunt.


That's awesome. She's going to run a Sales organization in a Fortune 500 company or be a top notch lawyer. She already knows how to negotiate from a position of strength!

:thumbsup:
All this for a bowl of borscht.
User avatar
slowshooter
hunter
 
Posts: 9011
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:44 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Sgtstadanko707 » Tue Jan 28, 2014 7:38 pm

Noobhunter wrote:
Sgtstadanko707 wrote:Did you just say minecraft. Man I am older and that was before my time. Lol


Minecraft is huge , especially the apps for phones and tablets. The kids will play for hours and then bore the hell out of you showing you their creations. Our elementary school costume parade last year had a lot of kids dressed up as the minecraft man, you know its popular then.


Really. I don't have any young ones around me so I guess I am
Out of the loop.
2013/2014 season
Days's in the field- 44

Number of birds- who cares.
Vegetarian is an old Indian word for " I don't hunt so good"
User avatar
Sgtstadanko707
hunter
 
Posts: 1578
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:45 pm
Location: Chico ca

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Jcleland » Tue Jan 28, 2014 9:42 pm

I think the jr hunt is awesome for kids, my boys hunt with me all year long and they love the jr hunt. My 10 year old has watched his 13 year old brother for three jr hunts now and finally he gets to join him. All of us are super excited. My boys have hunted all the refuges with me and made all the far walks, they have even had the chance to experience being crowded and having people shot the swing. They are dedicated to hunting and the jr hunt just gives us another weekend in the marsh. All around great idea.
Jcleland
hunter
 
Posts: 199
Joined: Sun Jun 24, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby marsh-mello » Tue Jan 28, 2014 9:49 pm

Uhhhh..Yeah they are a good idea, just because you're now too old and "Slow" isn't any reason to piss in anyone else's Cherrios.. :huh:
Take your boy out and have some more fun. :thumbsup:

May I say that spurious syn.(bogus, fake, false, fraudulent, sham, artificial, phony, feigned. misleading, deceptive, specious,etc...) plus side of your list of your could use some working over you think? :hammer:
Charter member of the "I only shoot bar belly geese club". I'm a Bar belly goose purist!
marsh-mello
hunter
 
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:30 pm

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby slowshooter » Wed Jan 29, 2014 3:04 am

I don't think the Junior Hunts are wrong. In fact, I think they are a nice reward for the kids that are genuinely interested in hunting.

For those kids that can participate with zero misgivings and have made the effort to become hunters? It's a nice boost for them. I know there a lot of kids out there whose days with their Dad or Mentor are life-long great memories. Who can argue with that?

That those same kids and mentors can go out every other day of the season and create even more memories? Well, they can and should.

I have friends and acquaintances who's kids accompany them while hunting. Some of the kids don't even hunt yet and are looking forward to doing so. In other cases, the kids do hunt and are just outstanding examples of young sportsmen/women in the field.

Are any of those personalities driven by the Junior Hunt to become hunters? As far as I can tell, no. Does that make the Jr. hunts any less well intentioned? Also a no. Those hunts are, at least in my opinion, a reward - not really a recruitment device.

And yeah I'm talking about a few other things as well.

First, not all parents are great parents. Not all kids are angels and not all motivations when it comes to taking the kids out are founded in providing the kid with a life long good memory of time with Pops. Sometimes Dad is a jackass, the kid is a spoiled brat and the only reason they are hunting together is the one that owns the truck is riding in on the other's reservation number.

Secondly, that other folks look at the Jr Hunts and think they are going to help recruitment numbers is something that always leaves me scratching my head. The hunts certainly aren't going to hurt those numbers - but they aren't going to have a major impact either.

If folks want to grow duck hunter numbers in a country that has a declining birthrate it might be better to recruit a neighbor or two than "grow your own".

Give an extra weekend to guys that convince someone take hunter safety class and get a license. Recruit 10 guys and get a 50% discount on a lifetime license… I have no idea what would work, since I just pulled those two ideas out of my butt. However, there should be some effort to make recruitment an effort that everyone would be pushing - that will actually get measurable results instead of generating good vibes and never quite enough hunters. The Junior Hunt simply isn't going to push the numbers significantly higher.

Don't mean to pee in the cheerios. Even though I'm more of a Raisin Bran kind of guy.

I hope all the Juniors that do make it out have a great time, get full straps and bring home great memories of family/friends to treasure.
All this for a bowl of borscht.
User avatar
slowshooter
hunter
 
Posts: 9011
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:44 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby marsh-mello » Wed Jan 29, 2014 5:57 am

Well I do think you are being just a bit cynical when it comes to projecting who might be a not so fit father and mentor and assuming a lot when it comes to those same colorful motivations to those attending junior hunts. Not that kids and adults as well cannot be selfish and self centered as it is those qualities which often drive some to "squeeze in" among other nefarious tactics to "get their share" or in some cases theirs and some of yours as well.

I will say the youth hunts do provide an opportunity where "most" of the competitiveness is left at the entry gate and the FOCUS is primarily on providing an enjoyable hunt for the kids. While you are correct in people are avoiding the "regular" Oklahoma rush and the greater possibility to running into some who would shoot their mothers swing among other less than stellar attributes it is IMHO the "best" opportunity for engaging in the sport with some modicum of increased success.

Now if I am going to choose a day where I am going to take my 15 year old daughter who might be only luke warm to the idea of hunting but is still willing to give it a go...well I feel they are better off at least initially participating under those circumstances. While you are correct I nor anyone else is not limited by these days it is is up to US to decide if this is the best choice given our other choices. They can have a realistic opportunity at an "better than average" time and perhaps decide later to go on a day where the stakes are upped some. That is for them to decide and I feel they are more apt to be gradually acclimated into the sport given those conditions rather than just saying well either they will like it or they won't, take the whole enchilada warts and all or don't come at all. Perhaps having a less than stellar day which the rest of us accept gleefully right, might initially turn off someone else. This is especially true when the chances of running into those who have less than Mother Theresa's manners or competing with 20 gauges with those who shoot 3 1/2" shells all day long while "smoking". They can and surely do in my estimation understand and adapt to the rest of the worlds unsavory characters at many other times and hopefully have mentors to steer clear of them by some of the many choices there are out here as they are out there everywhere anyway.

What I would like to see is more of an exposure in our education system or youth programs (boy/girl scouts, local recreational programs, much like CWA is doing, offering hunter safety courses etc...) which offer opportunity to participate in learning to shoot and then to participate in a controlled hunt especially if they are young and new. Some people would have to get over the fact that hunting is actually a very safe sport and will not automatically lead to shooting at schools or at the local mall but in fact just the opposite. We do not teach new drivers in a Ferrari nor take them out on the Autobahn on their first few adventures...they can be exposed to all the other horatio horn blowers out there after they spend some time in the Wallmart parking lot, there is nothing wrong with that and that's OK too.

Slow it's good to see you get your fiber from many sources...it's healthier that way. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

My recent family participation on an "other" than youth hunt day...

Image
Charter member of the "I only shoot bar belly geese club". I'm a Bar belly goose purist!
marsh-mello
hunter
 
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:30 pm

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Calikev » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:35 am

The junior hunts are fun. The kids get to hunt areas with no pressure on them and birds that have rested for a week. We love the options available for the kids as they can hunt places they ordinarly wouldn't get to hunt because they are too difficult to draw or competitively locked out. I've always seen the junior hunts as a gift to the kids. Nothing else. It doesn't "hook" the kids as many would think. It simply is a gift of appreciation they can enjoy for engaging in the sport. There are lots of apprentice based hunts out there to "hook" the kids. One weekend doesn't typically fit that bill although the EPIC ones might keep them coming back to the next junior hunt. You just hope there isn't any expectation that the regular season is always that way.

I think when you look at this from a more holistic view you realize for a lot of kids it is about building relationships. To most juniors it isn't about how many times they go for bird numbers but how many times they get to go with Dad. In the process some of them become connected with the sport, the same thing we experienced coming up into the sport. For those that never do become connected it just ends up not being their thing. No one can predict how a youngster is going to take to the sport. They may be ultimately be into it just to spend time with Dad and can get that same connection whether they are hunting, fishing, or watching a movie for that matter. For the kids that do really take to it, I tend to think they learn the connect to the natural allure of the marsh. They want more than just time with Dad. They will feel that same feeling many of us do, something that is more out there than just going. Being part of something much larger and experiencing a whole world outside of our civilized one. It just makes it gold when Dad is there with them to share it all with them. It becomes something they "share" together.

You can never predict who will "have it". I've seen kids from hunting families you expected would be stone cold hunters and they end up hating it. They still went with Dad but at some point the connection went elsewhere. Perhaps they both realized they didn't need to be in a marsh to experience that together. For those who do connect with Dad in the marsh, it is much different. You learn to enjoy one another but also the hunt for the same reasons. I've seen kids I would never expect to take to it end up being obsessive hunters like most of us. They can't get enough of it and frankly I would rather see them crazy about this than all the other things they could be getting into that leads them down the wrong path.

The challenge is getting them to take to it. Blame society. We live in a world where everything comes quickly and easy. A drive thru type experience. Social media, quick results through the Google Search engine........so how can hunting fit into that? Especially the dog days of November? How many times have you heard guys say "I will bring my son out when the hunting picks up? When the teal come in?" Folks feel like they need to put junior on the birds all the time to keep them interested. Is that because of society? We have to produce quick results or we are afraid they will not take to it? They might become bored?

For the kids who will pick it up, they will need to learn about the slow days as well as the good days. Junior hunts are like the cartoon. They aren't reality. Reality is they should spend some slow days in the marsh with Dad. Talk about life, the little things that go unnoticed when the flight is good, about what the future might bring, etc. All those conversations are what will become entrenched in your heart more than the bird flights.

Folks it has taken me a little time to start to realize that. I have a good friend who has a lot of experience with that in bringing his son up with that and his conversations with me when I feel frustrated that I can't always put my daughter on the birds have landed home. I realize that it is those moments out there that you will cherish the most and not the amount of birds you put the junior on.

So while the junior hunt is a great gift, it really isn't much different than what any other weekend should be.

Kevin
"It seems the harder I work the more luck I seem to have"
Calikev
hunter
 
Posts: 774
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2008 7:14 pm
Location: Oakdale

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby DuckFan » Wed Jan 29, 2014 12:25 pm

Ray,

Great picture. Great! :thumbsup:
Proud Life Member - CWA
Member - Delta Waterfowl
Member - Ducks Unlimited
User avatar
DuckFan
hunter
 
Posts: 1635
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 10:17 pm
Location: CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby slowshooter » Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:28 pm

marsh-mello wrote:Uhhhh..Yeah they are a good idea, just because you're now too old and "Slow" isn't any reason to piss in anyone else's Cherrios.. :huh:
Take your boy out and have some more fun. :thumbsup:

May I say that spurious syn.(bogus, fake, false, fraudulent, sham, artificial, phony, feigned. misleading, deceptive, specious,etc...) plus side of your list of your could use some working over you think? :hammer:



Ray,
I will make no effort to hide my cynicism, because applied properly it provides - as the Greeks used to believe - a path to truth. Genuine cynics get a bad rap because they aren't trying to crap on things, but are trying to divine the relative virtue in any given situation.

Certainly there are negative people that are cynical, in this case I would expect they wouldn't try to do much more than mask their disappointment, envy and anger over the idea that someone else got a slice of pie. God forbid that a kid gets to hunt with their Dad and gets in one more day than the childless or child-free hunter. Their cries of Unfair! Unfair! would ring pretty hollow to me. Speaking of pie, I think it's is way better than cake, but am happy when anyone gets either.

So, I'm asking cynically - not negatively - why people who hate socialism, and believe that no one should be handed welfare, or that people are trained from birth to be moochers, suddenly ignore that on Junior Hunt days - the government hands out a what could be considered a "socialist" benefit to their families?

How many Dads are actually going to explain to their kids that this isn't a grab bag event? That it's genuinely designed to give them a chance to practice their skills without having an adult overriding or overwriting their efforts? Based on my guesstimate? Less than 10 guys statewide.

How does a parent walk that thin line between talking about the opportunity to hunt ducks, without dipping a toe into greedily talking about how many more they'll bag because it's the Junior Hunt? Very few, because most guys are going to measure their kids day by the strap they lug in. Socialism + greed + being rewarded for taking more? Is that a good math lesson?

How does the Junior Hunt grow duck hunter numbers? Especially since the kids have ample opportunity to hunt all season long in Jr Blinds and at one refuge that is entirely dedicated to them. They can also hunt regular blinds, and assigned ponds so they don't have a creeper sneaking up on them.

When I slice and dice this to try and find a little truth, the Junior Hunts are a great place for kids that may not be all that concerned about anything but killing a duck - or are really appreciative of the opportunity to try out their shooting skills.

If there is a little hypocrisy, or self delusion around them it doesn't lie with good intentions or the kids.

Follow the currency (not necessarily money) and you'll find motivations that aren't always the same:

- The State is doing it for PR purposes or just maybe a sense of duty to the kids - neither of which are bad reasons.

- Some parents are doing it right and explain it's a chance to spread the wings a bit - then take their kid out for the 5th or 10th time of the year.

- Others guys are using it as an out because they've ignored their kid all season… Maybe their season long strap numbers are way more important to them than spending time with their kid.

- Other guys are just greedy for birds and want their kids to be the same way.

While I'm genuinely curious about this stuff (despite that it might not mean much) and might sound negative on the hunts, I absolutely support EVERY kid having additional opportunities.

However, when the adults pat themselves on the back? I could do without that entirely. Call the Junior Hunts what they are - a reward day for the kids that work their butts off, trying to learn something that many adults are too damn lazy to even try.

Junior Hunts aren't about recruitment - even if they *might* be about retention.

The reason I think it's important to make that distinction is because the only thing that will actually grow the numbers are the guys that encourage, mentor and hunt with folks that may have never done it before.

Saying the Junior Hunt helps the numbers (when there is no evidence of that) provides an excuse for people who want to avoid actively recruiting new hunters. Over the years I've even heard guys say the junior hunt is the primary recruiting event for our sport. IMO they couldn't be further from the truth.

Maybe we should try something different. How about the guys that bring in new hunters for the first month of the season get to go to the front of the reservation line? Not only would the new hunters benefit - but it would also benefit the guys that operate on the principle that if they get nothing out of it - they will do nothing for it. There are plenty of guys that operate just like that.

And Ray? That's an awesome picture… Seeing your daughter out there having fun warms that little piece of coal in my chest. I can't believe how much bigger she has gotten. Kids grow too darn fast.

Baiz
All this for a bowl of borscht.
User avatar
slowshooter
hunter
 
Posts: 9011
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:44 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby slowshooter » Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:29 pm

Calikev wrote:The junior hunts are fun. The kids get to hunt areas with no pressure on them and birds that have rested for a week. We love the options available for the kids as they can hunt places they ordinarly wouldn't get to hunt because they are too difficult to draw or competitively locked out. I've always seen the junior hunts as a gift to the kids. Nothing else. It doesn't "hook" the kids as many would think. It simply is a gift of appreciation they can enjoy for engaging in the sport. There are lots of apprentice based hunts out there to "hook" the kids. One weekend doesn't typically fit that bill although the EPIC ones might keep them coming back to the next junior hunt. You just hope there isn't any expectation that the regular season is always that way.

I think when you look at this from a more holistic view you realize for a lot of kids it is about building relationships. To most juniors it isn't about how many times they go for bird numbers but how many times they get to go with Dad. In the process some of them become connected with the sport, the same thing we experienced coming up into the sport. For those that never do become connected it just ends up not being their thing. No one can predict how a youngster is going to take to the sport. They may be ultimately be into it just to spend time with Dad and can get that same connection whether they are hunting, fishing, or watching a movie for that matter. For the kids that do really take to it, I tend to think they learn the connect to the natural allure of the marsh. They want more than just time with Dad. They will feel that same feeling many of us do, something that is more out there than just going. Being part of something much larger and experiencing a whole world outside of our civilized one. It just makes it gold when Dad is there with them to share it all with them. It becomes something they "share" together.

You can never predict who will "have it". I've seen kids from hunting families you expected would be stone cold hunters and they end up hating it. They still went with Dad but at some point the connection went elsewhere. Perhaps they both realized they didn't need to be in a marsh to experience that together. For those who do connect with Dad in the marsh, it is much different. You learn to enjoy one another but also the hunt for the same reasons. I've seen kids I would never expect to take to it end up being obsessive hunters like most of us. They can't get enough of it and frankly I would rather see them crazy about this than all the other things they could be getting into that leads them down the wrong path.

The challenge is getting them to take to it. Blame society. We live in a world where everything comes quickly and easy. A drive thru type experience. Social media, quick results through the Google Search engine........so how can hunting fit into that? Especially the dog days of November? How many times have you heard guys say "I will bring my son out when the hunting picks up? When the teal come in?" Folks feel like they need to put junior on the birds all the time to keep them interested. Is that because of society? We have to produce quick results or we are afraid they will not take to it? They might become bored?

For the kids who will pick it up, they will need to learn about the slow days as well as the good days. Junior hunts are like the cartoon. They aren't reality. Reality is they should spend some slow days in the marsh with Dad. Talk about life, the little things that go unnoticed when the flight is good, about what the future might bring, etc. All those conversations are what will become entrenched in your heart more than the bird flights.

Folks it has taken me a little time to start to realize that. I have a good friend who has a lot of experience with that in bringing his son up with that and his conversations with me when I feel frustrated that I can't always put my daughter on the birds have landed home. I realize that it is those moments out there that you will cherish the most and not the amount of birds you put the junior on.

So while the junior hunt is a great gift, it really isn't much different than what any other weekend should be.

Kevin


You sir, are doing it right. Great post! :thumbsup:
All this for a bowl of borscht.
User avatar
slowshooter
hunter
 
Posts: 9011
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:44 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Silver Wings » Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:47 pm

Calikev wrote:So while the junior hunt is a great gift, it really isn't much different than what any other weekend should be.

Kevin


I didn't quote the entire post, but it was all very well said. I couldn't agree more. I also agree with Slow.....there is no NEED for the Jr hunts, none at all. I started taking my boys at age 5 and I don't mean once or twice a season. I mean every shoot day that didn't cause them to miss school.....mostly :oops: . When they got their licenses we kept up the same pace 20-30 shoots per season PLUS the JR hunts. NE zone, Sac complex mid season and post season close to home. We viewed the Jr hunts as a gift, a bonus. For us rats the Jr hunts are so relaxing and easy, no racing and lots of birds!

I'm not sure why some kids take to hunting and some don't, my inclination is that it's either in them or it's not. I'm always amused reading the "getting a kid started" threads.....all the stuff you have to do to get a kid started. How you must keep the child entertained during the entire day, including suggestions of bringing those hand held video games or a smart phone for games.....I swear I could vomit when I read that crap. The marsh was my kids entertainment.....the birds, the bugs, the plants, it's all a wonderment to a kid. They don't need a smart phone, a dead spoonie in their lap will keep them plenty entertained for quite a while.

I will be the first to admit that I am so lucky that my boys took to the marsh the way they did. My advice as a dad is this.....if your kid doesn't take to hunting, then find something else outdoors that they do like and learn to like it yourself. If you haven't found that something by the time they are teenagers, life can get tough for kid and parent......and one Jr hunt at the end of the season is not the answer.
Silver Wings
hunter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:32 pm

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby marsh-mello » Wed Jan 29, 2014 9:15 pm

Slow the present day Greek philosophers must find a way to coexist with the modern day cro-magnons for they each are what they are... Everyone has a bit of self centered hypocritical socialist in them deep inside, you at times just desire to try and pry it out spoonful at a time. I do enjoy reading some of the posts on the controversial issues forum.

Oversimplifying ones dislike for another's lack of obtaining self actualization can be defined as snobbery unless it is fully understanding, accurate beyond mere individual perception and more personally encouraging than judgmental. You appear to be disgruntled and projecting generalizations which may or may not exist to the extent you have asserted. I believe my path may cross many more people and fortunately results in a brighter and more positive overview than a small cadre of self proclaimed inner circle elites may possess. I do not share your thinly cloaked abject cynicism, nor believe it's sole and noble claim of truth seeking, however, we do share the same propensity for philosophical barrels of ink. You only think 10 people have obtained the level of quiet contemplation seeking a buddhist like relationship with both the marsh and their progeny? I detect a bit more negative projection than probably is merited than running into a few "smoking", self centered youth users in your travails. Son...whom have you ran into out the in the marsh or waiting in line who gave you this impression If I may ask in earnest?

No better place to discuss life's philosophies and share in the honest expression of your inner soul and hopes for your children's future than in the marsh with your children...or for that matter anywhere you can be with them when they are not being "normal" obligatory recalcitrant teens. :lol3: :lol3: :lol3: Many many things in a persons growth process happen in stages nothing wrong with a junior hunt being a good first step either to hunting or any other process...nothing more, nothing less.

Nothing wrong with the self actualizing positive message just the broader brush than is warranted perceived as soaked in abject cynicism IMHO with which you used to paint it with. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: To be fair your last post was a bit more on target, perhaps you saw the same thing and felt the need to further elucidate?

I like junior hunts and what I like more is talking to juniors and have juniors show me all the species with pride and vividly retelling the highlights of the hunt with passion and enthusiasm. When adults come in I usually just ask how many they missed. :lol3: :lol3: :lol3:

What a great post by Kevin... :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Now stop being serious and get back to your original point... :lol3:
Last edited by marsh-mello on Thu Jan 30, 2014 6:50 am, edited 2 times in total.
Charter member of the "I only shoot bar belly geese club". I'm a Bar belly goose purist!
marsh-mello
hunter
 
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 1:30 pm

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby ohlonebaseball » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:31 pm

never hunted sac on a junior hunt, but straps were heavy, whether I went to Delevan, Colusa or LDC, all free roam.
ohlonebaseball
hunter
 
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:12 pm

Re: Junior Hunts a good idea?

Postby Sgtstadanko707 » Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:48 pm

LeakyW8ers wrote:
Sgtstadanko707 wrote:
quack-attack wrote:I have been taking both my kids duck hunting since they were 3, including to refuges. The jet sled is great for this. Before they had waders I would drag them out to an island or blind, in their little "boat" as they called it. I get really annoyed when I hear someone with a kid say "I cannot wait until my kid can go with me." What the hell are you waiting for? If you do not get them involved at an early age you will lose the battle to xbox, nintendo..etc. I hate that kids would rather stay home and play minecraft than go out in the field. Sure you give up some opportunities, You may not get to go as far as you would normally go or hunt as long as you normally would. Heck i used to take my son pheasant hunting and I used the jogger stroller. a hen spoonie with my kids is worth a stringer of greenheads by myself.


Did you just say minecraft. Man I am older and that was before my time. Lol


https://minecraft.net/


That wasn't what I was expecting
.
2013/2014 season
Days's in the field- 44

Number of birds- who cares.
Vegetarian is an old Indian word for " I don't hunt so good"
User avatar
Sgtstadanko707
hunter
 
Posts: 1578
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:45 pm
Location: Chico ca

Previous

Return to California Duck Hunting

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests