WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ohioboy » Tue Feb 18, 2014 11:51 am

Butta boom wrote:It was the democrats that voted to intern the Japenese.

I wanted to leave this alone, but the teacher in me can not do it. Executive Order 9066 put the Japanese into the camps, no votes were ever needed.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby High Sierras » Tue Feb 18, 2014 2:49 pm

ohioboy wrote:
Butta boom wrote:It was the democrats that voted to intern the Japenese.

I wanted to leave this alone, but the teacher in me can not do it. Executive Order 9066 put the Japanese into the camps, no votes were ever needed.

Yeah, so... FDR was a democrat. So it was all the democrats that voted for FDR that wanted him to inter all the Japanese rice farmers so they could re-appropriate (steal) the japanese farmer's allotment of rot water and build more duck clubs to save the Pacific flyway waterfowl from certain extinction... Hey Butta, tell the truth now...did your dad vote for FDR?

















Just joking!
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby DuckFan » Tue Feb 18, 2014 5:35 pm

Ohioboy



Go to You Tube and enter this search: Densho Oral History

You will get several video clips with people discussing their history with the camps.

And.....

Google. Mary Kageyama Nomura. The songbird of Manzanar

And.....

Click on the Teacher’s Tab at the top right of the web page

http://www.nps.gov/manz/index.htm

Great resource!



And.....


You can purchase this guys show on the subject

http://www.calgold.com/calgold/Default. ... s&Show=421






Good luck
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ditchbanker » Tue Feb 18, 2014 6:16 pm

DuckFan wrote:Ohioboy

Go to You Tube and enter this search: Densho Oral History

Good luck


Dangit Rick :mad:

There you go again being all helpful and such
...when are you gonna learn how to rattle the bars and fling your own feces around like all the other primates?
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby SnG » Tue Feb 18, 2014 7:38 pm

High Sierras wrote:
ohioboy wrote:
Butta boom wrote:It was the democrats that voted to intern the Japenese.

I wanted to leave this alone, but the teacher in me can not do it. Executive Order 9066 put the Japanese into the camps, no votes were ever needed.

Yeah, so... FDR was a democrat. So it was all the democrats that voted for FDR that wanted him to inter all the Japanese rice farmers so they could re-appropriate (steal) the japanese farmer's allotment of rot water and build more duck clubs to save the Pacific flyway waterfowl from certain extinction... Hey Butta, tell the truth now...did your dad vote for FDR?

















Just joking!


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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby slowshooter » Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:48 am

Maybe he can architect up a business we don't have to support.
All this for a bowl of borscht.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby Fishn4slugs » Wed Feb 19, 2014 5:57 pm

Hello Gents, as this is my 1st post, I wanted to introduce myself. But I guess introducing myself in a different topic might have been more appropriate, but I decided to jump in so to speak in response to this topic.
I am a third generation Japanese American. I have been actively hunting waterfowl for about ten years and went thru the joys of being a newbie that every hunter has gone thru. Hunt the north grasslands outside of Gustine and venture to some of the reserves a few times a year with an occasional goose hunt up north.
As for pictures ohioboy, I’ll check with my mother, as she was interned when she was twelve years old with my uncle and my grandparents. Imagine that, losing your livelihood, your home, your friends, your school and your FREEDOM at twelve years old. Although cameras were confiscated and were verboten behind barbed wire and machine gun towers, I can only ask if one or two may have survived.
I am sure that some, if not most of you learned in school that when Japanese Americans were relocated, their 1st stop was a gathering center to be processed. My mom’s 1st stop was the Tanforan racetrack in San Bruno, CA. I can only imagine the 1st night she slept in a horse stable with what she could only carry was a difficult one. Then, from there it was to Tule Lake, CA. Other families went to various prison camps located throughout the United States, while some families in Hawaii were imprisoned on Oahu.
Buttaboom, I am sure that maybe your family may have helped a fellow Japanese American farmer keep their property when they were sent to a prison camp, but a vast number of American families lost everything including my grandparents and had to start all over again.
Pearl Harbor was a defining moment in the History of the United States of America and veterans of World War Two are held in high esteem in my eyes, as are the veterans of the Korean conflict, Vietnam and Gulf Wars and the countless other Operations that the United States have participated in.
Ohioboy, I commend you for your service to teach our nation’s youth about US and world history, as our children and many of our adults have no idea of what happened in the past, lest we repeat it. We need more teachers like you.
Duckfan has listed some good resources. Also Google “Go For Broke 100th/442nd/MIS”
Sorry to ramble on, but just wanted to say hello and look forward to the madness on DHC.
"go out light, come back heavy"
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby slowshooter » Wed Feb 19, 2014 7:23 pm

Welcome aboard the good ship DHC. :welcome:
All this for a bowl of borscht.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby DuckFan » Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:52 pm

:hi:
Fishn4slugs wrote:Hello Gents, as this is my 1st post, I wanted to introduce myself. But I guess introducing myself in a different topic might have been more appropriate, but I decided to jump in so to speak in response to this topic.
I am a third generation Japanese American. I have been actively hunting waterfowl for about ten years and went thru the joys of being a newbie that every hunter has gone thru. Hunt the north grasslands outside of Gustine and venture to some of the reserves a few times a year with an occasional goose hunt up north.
As for pictures ohioboy, I’ll check with my mother, as she was interned when she was twelve years old with my uncle and my grandparents. Imagine that, losing your livelihood, your home, your friends, your school and your FREEDOM at twelve years old. Although cameras were confiscated and were verboten behind barbed wire and machine gun towers, I can only ask if one or two may have survived.
I am sure that some, if not most of you learned in school that when Japanese Americans were relocated, their 1st stop was a gathering center to be processed. My mom’s 1st stop was the Tanforan racetrack in San Bruno, CA. I can only imagine the 1st night she slept in a horse stable with what she could only carry was a difficult one. Then, from there it was to Tule Lake, CA. Other families went to various prison camps located throughout the United States, while some families in Hawaii were imprisoned on Oahu.
Buttaboom, I am sure that maybe your family may have helped a fellow Japanese American farmer keep their property when they were sent to a prison camp, but a vast number of American families lost everything including my grandparents and had to start all over again.
Pearl Harbor was a defining moment in the History of the United States of America and veterans of World War Two are held in high esteem in my eyes, as are the veterans of the Korean conflict, Vietnam and Gulf Wars and the countless other Operations that the United States have participated in.
Ohioboy, I commend you for your service to teach our nation’s youth about US and world history, as our children and many of our adults have no idea of what happened in the past, lest we repeat it. We need more teachers like you.
Duckfan has listed some good resources. Also Google “Go For Broke 100th/442nd/MIS”
Sorry to ramble on, but just wanted to say hello and look forward to the madness on DHC.




Welcome! Great first post.



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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby clampdaddy » Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:36 pm

Yeah, that's probably the best first post I've seen here. Sure beats the heck out of "hi im nu can sum 1 tell me where 2 go 2 shoot sum dux?"

Welcome. :beer:
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ohioboy » Wed Feb 19, 2014 11:24 pm

Fishn4slugs wrote:Hello Gents, as this is my 1st post, I wanted to introduce myself. But I guess introducing myself in a different topic might have been more appropriate, but I decided to jump in so to speak in response to this topic.
I am a third generation Japanese American. I have been actively hunting waterfowl for about ten years and went thru the joys of being a newbie that every hunter has gone thru. Hunt the north grasslands outside of Gustine and venture to some of the reserves a few times a year with an occasional goose hunt up north.
As for pictures ohioboy, I’ll check with my mother, as she was interned when she was twelve years old with my uncle and my grandparents. Imagine that, losing your livelihood, your home, your friends, your school and your FREEDOM at twelve years old. Although cameras were confiscated and were verboten behind barbed wire and machine gun towers, I can only ask if one or two may have survived.
I am sure that some, if not most of you learned in school that when Japanese Americans were relocated, their 1st stop was a gathering center to be processed. My mom’s 1st stop was the Tanforan racetrack in San Bruno, CA. I can only imagine the 1st night she slept in a horse stable with what she could only carry was a difficult one. Then, from there it was to Tule Lake, CA. Other families went to various prison camps located throughout the United States, while some families in Hawaii were imprisoned on Oahu.
Buttaboom, I am sure that maybe your family may have helped a fellow Japanese American farmer keep their property when they were sent to a prison camp, but a vast number of American families lost everything including my grandparents and had to start all over again.
Pearl Harbor was a defining moment in the History of the United States of America and veterans of World War Two are held in high esteem in my eyes, as are the veterans of the Korean conflict, Vietnam and Gulf Wars and the countless other Operations that the United States have participated in.
Ohioboy, I commend you for your service to teach our nation’s youth about US and world history, as our children and many of our adults have no idea of what happened in the past, lest we repeat it. We need more teachers like you.
Duckfan has listed some good resources. Also Google “Go For Broke 100th/442nd/MIS”
Sorry to ramble on, but just wanted to say hello and look forward to the madness on DHC.


thank you. this is exactly what i was hoping for. a story that does not come from a website or book goes a long way with my kids.

442 was, and is, still the most decorated unit ever. buttaboom should look into that. yes i teach that. show video too with commentary from some of those guys.

F4S, welcome.

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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ohioboy » Wed Feb 19, 2014 11:26 pm

clampdaddy wrote:Yeah, that's probably the best first post I've seen here. Sure beats the heck out of "hi im nu can sum 1 tell me where 2 go 2 shoot sum dux?"

Welcome. :beer:


i have gps cordinates if you want. :yes:

i agree about the best first post. i learned a long time ago, you cant get a yes unless you ask, and i am glad i did. thus my marriage. and then the second one. :tongue:
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby blackdog58 » Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:27 am

Welcome fishn4
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ditchbanker » Thu Feb 20, 2014 8:58 am

blackdog58 wrote:Welcome fishn4


... :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby danny6172 » Wed Feb 26, 2014 1:32 am

Butta boom wrote:Before you ask for pictures of the interned Japanese, how many pictures of the eighteen year old boys that were serving their country, that were killed in a sneak attack on pearl harbor, are being used in the class.

Interned Japanese had weeks warning before they were interned, we would have enjoyed that same lead time. The interned Japanese that had property were treated well by their neighbors. The farmers in my area took care of those farms, and in many cases were returned to them after the war.

If the purpose of your curriculum is to dishonor our behavior in the second world war, you should be removed from any contact with our youth, let alone be a teacher.

For those of us that lost family in that war, the wounds are healed, but the distortion of history is intolerable.


You sound like a communist
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby Butta boom » Thu Feb 27, 2014 9:46 pm

I repeat, the distortion of history is intolerable. The first reaction to the attack on pearl was to move the entire population on the west coast, to a point east of the coast by 100 miles. That was the first reaction, to protect our population. Thankfully that did not happen. That relocation would have been more catastrophic than what we did to the Japanese.

We were brought unwillingy into a world war by a sneak attack. Think about that. Should we pull one of those on Iran or the Ruskys?

Of course not, but they did. Do you remember the response after 9-11? Most of us wanted to retaliate in some manner. The public had a more responsive and patriotic attitude in those days, and that needs to be considered.

We ferreted out Japenese spy's on the coast, and killed them. Most of the Japanese were recent immigrants, that had families in Japan, the suspicion after such a sneak attack, was justifiable.

Japanese submarines were sighted of our coast, and fake gun emplacements were erected on the west coast to try to deter an attack, because we were unprepared to fend of such an attack.

In the overall historical result of WW2, the change to our status in the world, and the Geo-political outcome of that conflict, the injustice done to our Japanese immigrants was a small part of the war. If the curriculum consisted of two hundred classroom hours, which it should, the Japanese internment should get a good hour. With most of that hour devoted to the Manzanar fishing club whacking the trout in the Owens river, when most of the fisherman in SoCal didn't have the Gas ration stamps to go fishing at all.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby zkalinowski » Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:05 pm

Butta boom wrote:I repeat, the distortion of history is intolerable. The first reaction to the attack on pearl was to move the entire population on the west coast, to a point east of the coast by 100 miles. That was the first reaction, to protect our population. Thankfully that did not happen. That relocation would have been more catastrophic than what we did to the Japanese.

We were brought unwillingy into a world war by a sneak attack. Think about that. Should we pull one of those on Iran or the Ruskys?

Of course not, but they did. Do you remember the response after 9-11? Most of us wanted to retaliate in some manner. The public had a more responsive and patriotic attitude in those days, and that needs to be considered.

We ferreted out Japenese spy's on the coast, and killed them. Most of the Japanese were recent immigrants, that had families in Japan, the suspicion after such a sneak attack, was justifiable.

Japanese submarines were sighted of our coast, and fake gun emplacements were erected on the west coast to try to deter an attack, because we were unprepared to fend of such an attack.

In the overall historical result of WW2, the change to our status in the world, and the Geo-political outcome of that conflict, the injustice done to our Japanese immigrants was a small part of the war. If the curriculum consisted of two hundred classroom hours, which it should, the Japanese internment should get a good hour. With most of that hour devoted to the Manzanar fishing club whacking the trout in the Owens river, when most of the fisherman in SoCal didn't have the Gas ration stamps to go fishing at all.

Well after reading through this for the last 10 or 15 minutes in a daring attempt to procrastinate and further put off studying for my Dynamics test, I found one fatal flaw in your fiery rhetoric. Your anger over a teacher teaching about the internment camps is, in my opinion, a bit over the top, but hey, to each their own, I won't bash your beliefs if you don't bash mine. However, you seem to be assuming that Ohio isn't teaching his students about the rest of the war, which is a conclusion just not found in the evidence. Isn't it at all possible that this teacher didn't have to go to great lengths to find pictures and stories about American G.I.'s, but did for the interned Japanese, a far smaller population that was largely stripped of cameras and had to record their stories largely through text and orally? You act like he is ONLY teaching about the internment camps, which were, as you said, just one part of a global conflict. Isn't it far more likely that this teacher is teaching his kids the whole story and just needed to reach out for help on this one particular issue, in order to give his students a more fulfilling and enlightening experience? For all we know he is only going to spend 30 minutes on the internment camps, but I can promise you that 30 minutes of personal anecdotes and photographs will leave a much more vivid image of our past than 30 minutes of reading from a text book would. Just my $.02, which, as I'm sure you will remind me of, no one asked for.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby Butta boom » Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:36 pm

I gave a relative perspective to what I thought was the world impact of our participation in the war and the outcome, as opposed to the relatively small impact of a very generous, in that time and circumstance, response to an unprecedented sneak attack that just happened to kill my uncle. I know many Interned Japenese, including the afformentioned John Oji. He is a heck of a lot better off than my uncle Neil. He would freely admit that.

The point is that we are ignoring the outcome of that conflict, and by doing so, and emphasizing the internment of the Japanese, will only distort the history that we must preserve.

When a people is lied to by their government, and encouraged to harbor animosity towards another nation, under false pretenses, it is their duty to revolt, rather than go to war under under these circumstances. The Japanese were under these conditions when the war broke out.

If there is sympathy to be meted out, perhaps it should be for the victims of Hiroshima, and Nagasaki. They were as innocent as the internment families, but a lot worse off.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ShootThemInTheEye » Fri Feb 28, 2014 12:29 am

""I gave a relative perspective to what I thought was the world impact of our participation in the war and the outcome, as opposed to the relatively small impact of a very generous, in that time and circumstance, response to an unprecedented sneak attack that just happened to kill my uncle. I know many Interned Japenese, including the afformentioned John Oji. He is a heck of a lot better off than my uncle Neil. He would freely admit that.""


"A very generous response" Wow, This was all well before my time but when you can justify a wholesale internment of a group of AMERICANS based on race and call it a generous response I think your vision of what the constitution says is a little blurry. By that logic taking everyone's guns because they are responsible for thousands of deaths every year would be a "generous response" Should we have locked up and taken away all the property of every Islamic after 9-11? I guess you would probably say we should have and it would have been "generous" of us to do so.

As far as "more patriotic" then than now. I beg to differ. If by patriotic you mean blindly following our government then yes Americans were more patriotic. Being a patriot to me means more than that. You inferred the Japanese should not have fought and revolted because they were being lied to. Well maybe a few Americans should have revolted when their friends were being wrongly imprisoned? The sword cuts both ways. You either live by the document this country was founded upon or you don't You can't pick and choose who to protect.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ohioboy » Sun Mar 02, 2014 3:57 pm

"in order to give his students a more fulfilling and enlightening experience? For all we know he is only going to spend 30 minutes on the internment camps, but I can promise you that 30 minutes of personal anecdotes and photographs will leave a much more vivid image of our past than 30 minutes of reading from a text book would."

this sums it up perfectly. Butta, i think you need to look into exactly how much students are in school these days. your memory appears to be hazy. i have 184 days, 46 minutes each day. that is all. there is maybe 15 minutes i can devote to this subject. i have to cover from 1865-present in 184 days. i am just trying to do my job and do it the best i can. cold war starts this week-should i not teach about the Red Scare? McCarthy? CIA? Cuban Missile Crisis (do you know why Russia put missiles there?)? our history is ups and downs, but it is history. period. if you only teach one side, well it would appear a lot like another country that we fought against for the whole cold war.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby ditchbanker » Mon Mar 03, 2014 9:55 am

ohioboy wrote:..........our history is ups and downs, but it is history. period. if you only teach one side, well it would appear a lot like another country that we fought against for the whole cold war.


...History is not 'belief' although many would have us think that it is
...we often need some separation in order to see reason (and reasons) in our own motivations
...asking the questions as you have, you've discovered more personal stories
...and discovered some lingering anger that shapes some politics
...makes me ponder how 'History' will be written about more recent events

Please continue exposing our kids to all sides of the issues
...best you can in those precious few minutes a day :thumbsup:
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby quack-attack » Mon Mar 03, 2014 9:57 am

My wife is a principal, she deals with teachers all day every day for 15 hours a day at a minimum. Managing 10% of her staff takes up 75% of her time. It is far and away the biggest part of her job. Dealing with the kids is easy. Dealing with the overprotected teachers is rediculous. It is amazing how many crappy, lazy POS trough feeding teachers that hand out photocopies and prewritten assignments and do very little teaching there are out there. And it is really sad how little can be done about it from a management perspective. I understand a large chunk of the disgrutledness of teachers is a result of being beaten down by the system but still it is a crying shame.

Here we have a teacher doing research, developing a topic and presenting historical data to his class. You are going so far beyond what a large chunk of our "teachers" do today. I wish more teachers had your enthusiasm. Thank you for your efforts. The kids deserve more teachers like you that have enthusiasm to teach rather than just regurjitate data.

Thank you,
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby terenceb » Mon Mar 03, 2014 2:17 pm

As a person who majored in History at San Jose State, and a 4th generation Japanese American who's grandmother was interned at Topaz and who's grandfather fought for the United States in Italy and France as part of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, I appreciate the efforts of OhioBoy.

I would be more than happy to send a scanned photo(s) of my grandfather. I have some pictures of him at Camp Shelby in Mississippi, photo's of him and his friends volunteering for the US Army in Hawai'i, and a couple of them drinking in Anzio and Rome. Unfortunately, I never really got to go to Topaz with my grandmother before she passed in 2008. It is one of the biggest regrets of my life. I don't think she had many pictures of camp life either, I just have stories she would tell me.

Just PM me and we can discuss more.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby 34 grains of Herco » Mon Mar 03, 2014 5:36 pm

My history teacher at Long Beach Poly in 1965 was Frank Takahashi. His entire family was interned at the start of the war. He ended the war in uniform with the 442nd. He presented both sides of the situation, with no editorializing...as he had lived both sides during the war. That was one honorable man.
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Re: WWII-Japanese Internment Camps

Postby Butta boom » Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:51 pm

The geo-political boundaries that were drawn after the end of the war, are having an impact even today. The curriculum that has been taught lately has downplayed the ongoing threat that the Russian and Chinese empires impose upon us, today.

Our current ruler, was obviously educated under that slacker curriculum.

Now look where we are. Millions of formerly free people, the Ukrainians are about to be enslaved again, after twenty years of freedom.

Because the serious issues were not taught, a generation did not learn. Because a generation did not learn, our leaders were not smart, since our leaders were not smart, more people became less free.

How much time time should we spend on the internment camps?

There are no photos because the interned weren't allowed to have cameras. The spy thing. See Ansel Adams Manzanar photos, he was commissioned by our government to document the internment. See if you can find the equivalent in Germany or Japan.

We are nearly at war again, pay attention.
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