Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

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Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby AaronR » Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:47 am

Here you go guys, I created this to discuss the grass issues. I personally have no experiences where grass was a problem for duck hunting. I do know that there are some areas, NW LA for one, that have invasive species that have taken over some lakes and backwater areas off the Red River. So let us know what area you hunt where grass is or is not an issue..
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby Ducaholic » Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:31 pm

Everywhere I hunt! Invasive aquatics is the number 1 problem facing public land hunters in La. IMO!
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby A5Mag12 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:41 pm

MeanGreen wrote:Everywhere I hunt! Invasive aquatics is the number 1 problem facing public land hunters in La. IMO!


This.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby AaronR » Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:59 pm

MeanGreen wrote:Everywhere I hunt! Invasive aquatics is the number 1 problem facing public land hunters in La. IMO!


Can you be more specific? Like what part of the state or general area are you talking about. I could say the exact opposite that zero places I hunt have any invasive plants that inhibit duck hunters and it is not a problem at all.

But I am not saying that, to be clear. I am saying that I hunt most of North Central to North East La (lakes, rivers, ponds, etc..) and that the places I hunt do not have this problem.

Im just curious as to how much of the state is affected by this.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby T-TOP » Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:36 pm

water hyacinth and salvinia, are the most common i hear of. salvinia being the worse of the two. have not had personal issues where i hunt but know guys that have ponds completly choked with salvinia. bioligist have been trying some sort of insect that eats it, have heard good things but who knows. locations are mostly coastal marshes, fresh and salt. no expert just repeating what i have heard and read.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby T-TOP » Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:38 pm

salvinia weevil is the insect
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby Ducaholic » Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:08 pm

AaronR wrote:
MeanGreen wrote:Everywhere I hunt! Invasive aquatics is the number 1 problem facing public land hunters in La. IMO!


Can you be more specific? Like what part of the state or general area are you talking about. I could say the exact opposite that zero places I hunt have any invasive plants that inhibit duck hunters and it is not a problem at all.

But I am not saying that, to be clear. I am saying that I hunt most of North Central to North East La (lakes, rivers, ponds, etc..) and that the places I hunt do not have this problem.

Im just curious as to how much of the state is affected by this.



All of the lakes, bayou's and sloughs associated with the WMA's and NWR's in and around Central La.

When most of the forrested wetlands were cleared in the 60's and 70's for ag purposes the natural filter that these vast areas provided were lost forever. Silt began to take it toll from the run off. The nail in the coffin was the lock and dam projects that now dot the Red River. No longer do these areas get the consistent back wash from river system that was so prevalent before the lock and dam systems were initiated.

It's been a slow painful death to many of my favorite honey holes most of which I will never ever hunt again!
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby POKER1 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:34 pm

I thought hyacinth was an issue for many years. At least you could control it. Salvinia is the devil though and Id give anything to have the hyacinth back..... Invassive grass is the number 1 problem in my area. When you factor in the growing hunter pressure with the ever declining huntable water available it doesnt take a rocket scientist to figure out what the outcome will be. Or already is. A broke state and no real handle on how to kill off the salvinia is a loosing battle for all of us.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby AaronR » Tue Jan 15, 2013 7:20 am

POKER1 wrote:I thought hyacinth was an issue for many years. At least you could control it. Salvinia is the devil though and Id give anything to have the hyacinth back..... Invassive grass is the number 1 problem in my area. When you factor in the growing hunter pressure with the ever declining huntable water available it doesnt take a rocket scientist to figure out what the outcome will be. Or already is. A broke state and no real handle on how to kill off the salvinia is a loosing battle for all of us.


Yes I agree with you, I have seen the Hyacinth all of my life during the summer while fishing all over the state. A lot of which you could navigate through if you knew where you wanted to go due to it floating on top of the water. The salvinia has not invaded our part of the state yet so I have no experience with it.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby AaronR » Tue Jan 15, 2013 7:54 am

MeanGreen wrote:All of the lakes, bayou's and sloughs associated with the WMA's and NWR's in and around Central La.


Just talked with a buddy who hunts that area and he says the same thing. I sure hope it dont come NE!!!
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby A5Mag12 » Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:51 am

The waters we are losing in NW La. to salvinia are some of the best duck holding waters we have in the area. So whether or not your hole has ever had any salvinia you still have less ducks to potentially fly by you on any given day and you also will if you haven't already have new hunters helping you pressure the fewer and fewer ducks because the lake they used to hunt now looks like a pasture. It is everyone's problem.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby alans » Tue Jan 15, 2013 8:19 pm

I hunt in northeast Louisiana and giant salvinia is slowly destroying my favorite duck hunting lake. Turkey creek lake is eat up with it. I have also noticed common salvinia on lake darbonne and i have seen sone on lake bruin a few years ago.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby D Comeaux » Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:03 pm

Salvinia and other aquatic plants are being tranfered from lake to lake via boat trailes and other hunting / fishing equipment. After reading how wide spread this stuff is proves that point. It's has been mainly confined to the northern half of the state for now and I did see some at Toledo. If i'm not mistaken the LDFW has and can issue fines if they find someone backing into a lake with invasive plant matter on their boat trailers.
To help slow the spread of this stuff it would be a good idea to check your trailers and equipment before putting it back in the water. It may not help with whats out there now but it may help to keep some of your honey holes open until someone finds a way to control/kill it. Did this Salvania stuff first start out at Bistineau?
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby alans » Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:29 pm

I used to work with ldwf aquatic division before i transferred to another job. I think toledo may have had it first. I have sprayed both tolefo bend and bisteneau. They were both thoroughly covered in areas i sprayed. I think it came from texas. Almost positive our spray boats brought it to Turkey creek lake. We had the means of controlling it. Chemical called galleon. It was extremely effective on Turkey creek lake. If it wasn't for hurricane Gustav, it would have eradicated it. The patent should be running out on it soon, so maybe it will become cheaper.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby D Comeaux » Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:38 pm

alans wrote:I used to work with ldwf aquatic division before i transferred to another job. I think toledo may have had it first. I have sprayed both tolefo bend and bisteneau. They were both thoroughly covered in areas i sprayed. I think it came from texas. Almost positive our spray boats brought it to Turkey creek lake. We had the means of controlling it. Chemical called galleon. It was extremely effective on Turkey creek lake. If it wasn't for hurricane Gustav, it would have eradicated it. The patent should be running out on it soon, so maybe it will become cheaper.


So the texas boys carried it over!!! :lol3: I did notice that the salvania didn't last very long or spread as bad in Toledo but it is a big area. Is Bistineau still packed with this stuff?
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby alans » Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:51 pm

Its still bad in bisteneau. It is also still incredibly bad in certain areas of Toledo bend. Its usually in areas where its thick trees and little current. If its in open water waves usually strand a lot of it on the banks.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby AaronR » Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:35 am

alans wrote:I hunt in northeast Louisiana and giant salvinia is slowly destroying my favorite duck hunting lake. Turkey creek lake is eat up with it. I have also noticed common salvinia on lake darbonne and i have seen sone on lake bruin a few years ago.


I have lived on Lake Darbonne my entire life and Salvinia is not a problem..Hydrilla is the only plant species that has been identified as an issue by anyone and I think that is the most stupid thing ever. The hydrilla helped the fishing tremendously IMO.

I spend a ton of weekends every summer at our camps on lake bruin and salvinia is not an issue there either. There may be a little on that one end but it does not hinder fishing or hunting.

Lake St. Joseph is near by there and get choked out with lily pads and I tihnk a small amount of Salvinia in the northern end.

Did Turkey Creek have water in it before all this rain? I believe they were repairing the damn or something and never heard if they finished it.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby D Comeaux » Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:48 am

AaronR wrote:
alans wrote:I hunt in northeast Louisiana and giant salvinia is slowly destroying my favorite duck hunting lake. Turkey creek lake is eat up with it. I have also noticed common salvinia on lake darbonne and i have seen sone on lake bruin a few years ago.


I have lived on Lake Darbonne my entire life and Salvinia is not a problem YET..Hydrilla is the only plant species that has been identified as an issue by anyone and I think that is the most stupid thing ever. The hydrilla helped the fishing tremendously IMO.

I spend a ton of weekends every summer at our camps on lake bruin and salvinia is not an issue there either. There may be a little on that one end but it does not hinder fishing or hunting.

Lake St. Joseph is near by there and get choked out with lily pads and I tihnk a small amount of Salvinia in the northern end.

Did Turkey Creek have water in it before all this rain? I believe they were repairing the damn or something and never heard if they finished it.




FIFY :lol3: :thumbsup:
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby AaronR » Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:17 pm

D Comeaux wrote:
AaronR wrote:
alans wrote:I hunt in northeast Louisiana and giant salvinia is slowly destroying my favorite duck hunting lake. Turkey creek lake is eat up with it. I have also noticed common salvinia on lake darbonne and i have seen sone on lake bruin a few years ago.


I have lived on Lake Darbonne my entire life and Salvinia is not a problem YET..Hydrilla is the only plant species that has been identified as an issue by anyone and I think that is the most stupid thing ever. The hydrilla helped the fishing tremendously IMO.

I spend a ton of weekends every summer at our camps on lake bruin and salvinia is not an issue there either. There may be a little on that one end but it does not hinder fishing or hunting.

Lake St. Joseph is near by there and get choked out with lily pads and I tihnk a small amount of Salvinia in the northern end.

Did Turkey Creek have water in it before all this rain? I believe they were repairing the damn or something and never heard if they finished it.




FIFY :lol3: :thumbsup:


THANKS! :fingerhead:
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby adamdu82 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 3:33 pm

I work as a coastal scientist and go most places from as far east as des allemands to as far west as wax lake outlet. The biggest 3 I see are water hycainth, salvinia, and hydrilla. From what i heard salvinia is very hard to get rid of. Also, if someone dosen't think that hydrilla is a problem.........don't run your boat through it and let it keep growing. It will grow so thick it will probably begin to arise from the water's surface. We definetly have a problem on our hands with a number of invasive species. Its a shame how they are ruining prime habitat.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby Rick Hall » Wed Jan 16, 2013 3:55 pm

T-TOP wrote:...salvinia being the worse of the two. have not had personal issues where i hunt but know guys that have ponds completly choked with salvinia...locations are mostly coastal marshes, fresh and salt. no expert just repeating what i have heard and read.


The aquatic plant guys here may correct me, but I don't believe it's salt tolerant.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby sdm111 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 5:34 pm

The areas of Big Branch NWR I hunt are clear, just marsh grass & water.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby alans » Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:10 pm

Common salvinia isn't a big of a deal compared to giant. On darbonne it was along the edge of the bank around the main lake area of farmerville. Hydrilla and coontail were in a few shallow places. Those two plants are a duck hunters best friend. I know gadwalls tear up coontail in my.duck hole. The drawdown on Turkey creek helped water hyacinth and salvinia flourish. Wasn't able to access it to spray. It will cost a good bit of money to fix the dam they said. So, it won't be getting fixed.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby POKER1 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:45 pm

D Comeaux wrote:Salvinia and other aquatic plants are being tranfered from lake to lake via boat trailes and other hunting / fishing equipment. After reading how wide spread this stuff is proves that point. It's has been mainly confined to the northern half of the state for now and I did see some at Toledo. If i'm not mistaken the LDFW has and can issue fines if they find someone backing into a lake with invasive plant matter on their boat trailers.
To help slow the spread of this stuff it would be a good idea to check your trailers and equipment before putting it back in the water. It may not help with whats out there now but it may help to keep some of your honey holes open until someone finds a way to control/kill it. Did this Salvania stuff first start out at Bistineau?


You can not get it all off your trailer. To get the salvinia that is trapped under the hull I would have to have a lift to pick up the hull and a power washer to blast the trailer. I would not ever be able to launch my boat again. I dont ever see it going away. Praying for a miracle.
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Re: Is GRASS a problem where you hunt?

Postby POKER1 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 9:00 pm

alans wrote:Common salvinia isn't a big of a deal compared to giant. On darbonne it was along the edge of the bank around the main lake area of farmerville. Hydrilla and coontail were in a few shallow places. Those two plants are a duck hunters best friend. I know gadwalls tear up coontail in my.duck hole. The drawdown on Turkey creek helped water hyacinth and salvinia flourish. Wasn't able to access it to spray. It will cost a good bit of money to fix the dam they said. So, it won't be getting fixed.



Yeh, I had an interesting conversation with the head guy up here last may. He tried to convince me that by opening the spillway on Wallace that the salvinia would flow out of the lake. They dropped the water and then couldnt launch their boats to spray. When the salvinia is so thick and matted that a secondary growth of weeds grew on top of it there is no way it will flow past a million cypress trees. His ego could not allow him to admit it and I cant wait till we run into each other again so he can tell me what plan B is going to do. I would be more than happy to spend my time and gas to spray some if they would provide the chemicals. Im sure there are a few more with capable rigs that would do the same. It is not going to kill itself off. Best we can hope for is 4 good days of ice on the lake before this winter is over.

At least the flowers were pretty.
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