Running Out

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Running Out

Postby WoundedKnee14 » Sun Dec 01, 2013 8:24 pm

Of spots that is. This Saturday proved to be quite uneventful for the gang and I. Headed over to the lake nice and early only to find that it had almost completely iced over during the night. With what little time we had, we opted for our plan B on the river and sure enough, it too had enough ice to inhibit hunting. We then ditched the pursuit of waterfowl and stalked upland game, also unsuccessful I might add. These cold temps are driving me insane.

My last option is to head toward the coastal area. I'm not looking to steal any spots (well, I won't be disappointed if you make an offer :biggrin: ) but I was looking for advice regarding how to's, safety, types of spots to look for, etc. I know that the tides can be tricky and was wondering how you coastal zoner's compensate for it. I've never hunted the coast before so any advice you guys can give me is greatly appreciated.

Hope everyone has had a safe and productive season so far and best of luck as the cold continues to draw in :thumbsup:
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Re: Running Out

Postby Cpetit33 » Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:54 am

Everyone's doing the same as you I've been hunting my same 3 blinds on the river all year and lately guys have been in them or like to set up right in my shooting lanes so I can't hunt it pretty much a war zone out there and you gutta get out really early to get a spot. I get out an hour before legal shooting and I've had guys already on the spots set up
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Re: Running Out

Postby native brookie » Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:46 pm

WoundedKnee14 wrote:My last option is to head toward the coastal area. I'm not looking to steal any spots (well, I won't be disappointed if you make an offer :biggrin: ) but I was looking for advice regarding how to's, safety, types of spots to look for, etc. I know that the tides can be tricky and was wondering how you coastal zoner's compensate for it. I've never hunted the coast before so any advice you guys can give me is greatly appreciated.



A few bits of advice, learned from experience not following them:

(1) If you're hunting tidal areas, you need to know them well. This means scouting, probably early in the season (or while fishing) to understand tides, where you can and can't walk, where you can and can't take a boat.

(2) If you're hunting tidal areas late in the season, add the complication of ice formation. It's easy to get in trouble when ice forms rapidly. On Friday, I hunted a salt marsh spot that seemed fine on the rising tide. As soon as the tide went slack, the surface started to freeze, and I was breaking ice with the canoe for 1/4 mile to get back home. It was skim ice and no big deal--but if I hadn't noticed and more ice had formed before I headed home, I could have been stuck. I've had friends who got their boat trapped by a wind shift that piled ice floes across an opening they planned to pass through on their way back to the ramp. They didn't end up calling for help, but they thought about it.

(3) Take enough boat. You can hunt the coast in a sculler, a canoe, or a kayak, but you need to pick your spots, and you need to be VERY competent in the boat. Unfortunately, the best way to get competent and learn which spots not to pick is experience--and December on the ocean is not the time to start.

(4) If you're getting nervous about the weather, waves, your paddling skill . . . . it's time to head in.

(5) Wear a life jacket and bring a spare set of clothes to change into if you get wet.

(6) To begin to figure out all of the above, you're better off starting your salt water hunting in the early season, or going out with someone who has more experience, before you go on your own.
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Re: Running Out

Postby native brookie » Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:51 pm

PS

Before you go, read the short story "The Ledge", which is based on a real event where three hunters lost their lives in Casco Bay. I'm sure it's out of print, but you can probably find a web copy through Google.
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Re: Running Out

Postby mtstringer » Tue Dec 03, 2013 12:02 pm

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Re: Running Out

Postby 733SubDucker » Tue Dec 03, 2013 1:07 pm

Lesson of "The Ledge":

Don't let your boat drift away when hunting a ledge that submerges at high tide... especially in the age before cell phones. :eek:
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Re: Running Out

Postby Maineduckhunter » Tue Dec 03, 2013 5:28 pm

Scout, scout and scout some more. Everything that brookie pointed out is real good advice, and was learned the hard way, so heed the advice.
How to's? - Same as anywhere else, just need to learn the area (scout).
Safety - Yes, common sense here, wear your PFD at all times, be careful where you step, learn the tides, and what they may bring in (think ice).
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Re: Running Out

Postby papageno » Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:33 pm

Thanks for th advise... Im sizing up the same scenarios. Right now, the normal 8 ft tides are 11 ft tides - forming rapids in the tidal creeks. :eek: Im sticking to salt ponds.
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Re: Running Out

Postby WoundedKnee14 » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:43 pm

Thanks for the tips guys. Sounds like it could be a little scary to get into. Without a lot of experience in tides it looks like I'll need to take extra precautionary measures. Definitely something I'll get more into next season :thumbsup:
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Re: Running Out

Postby papageno » Fri Dec 06, 2013 4:10 pm

I didnt mean to put you off entirely, just be safe. Theres plenty of places you can walk in to a puddle. The birds will come in if they are using the area, even if the ponds are frozen. There are also places where the guts are small... So even if the current is strong, youre not on big water. Scout and plan, scout and plan.
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