Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

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Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Crow Bait » Tue Jan 03, 2012 5:30 pm

I scouted Sunday and found that the goose fields are all overgrown. Did any of you hunt it when it was still actively farmed? Did you kill anything? It seems like it was a perfect situation before the state decided to let the fields lie fallow and plant seedling trees. :fingerhead:

By the way - if you need to work your rabbit dogs - this would probably be a good place.
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Bay Bob » Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:10 am

Crow Bait wrote:I scouted Sunday and found that the goose fields are all overgrown. Did any of you hunt it when it was still actively farmed? Did you kill anything? It seems like it was a perfect situation before the state decided to let the fields lie fallow and plant seedling trees. :fingerhead:

By the way - if you need to work your rabbit dogs - this would probably be a good place.


Hey Scott, welcome to the zoo ! My new home since i got banned at the Fuge !

Yeah I hunted Greenwell years ago - - - they had a pretty good pit on the field closest to the river and the geese used it pretty regular.

I probably hunted it a dozen times because I lived close by at the time, and probably killed 6 geese in those trips.

Folks that run Greenwell are not all that interested in hunting, more horsey, artsy, yuppy folks from my experience and I suspect that they know if it is not farmed it will not be hunted. They use those fields as riding trails and that is probably all they are really interested in.

Might be a good project for a local Conservation group to pursue :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

Fact is we could really use a Southern Maryland Waterfowl Association just for issues like this - - - :thumbsup:
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Crow Bait » Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:35 pm

Bob,

Thanks for the data point. It is exactly as a figured. I heard the same thing happened to the fields at St.Mary's River State Park back in the 90's (although probably for different reasons). I find it hard to believe that there wasn't anyone willing to farm these fields (and pay the state $$$ to do so).

My ideal outcome is that the park service open one of the actively farmed fields for goose hunting and use the permit/reservation process managed by the wildlife office to mitigate any user conflicts. I'd also like to see those waterblinds brought back to life. I'm willing to request a meeting with the park service to see if something can be worked out, and share in the grunt work.
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Dr. LoKo » Wed Jan 04, 2012 1:38 pm

Crow Bait and Bay Bob,

Posted on the other thread (SOMDWFA) but thought I would reiterate it here. Let me know what I can do to help improve hunting opportunities in SOMD. Have lots of enthusiasm and a strong back to put towards the end goal. Unfortunately I live in DC so Weeday events may be tough but am willing to travel on weekends to asssit in any way.

Best,

LoKo
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Bay Bob » Thu Jan 05, 2012 11:08 am

Crow Bait wrote:Bob,

Thanks for the data point. It is exactly as a figured. I heard the same thing happened to the fields at St.Mary's River State Park back in the 90's (although probably for different reasons). I find it hard to believe that there wasn't anyone willing to farm these fields (and pay the state $$$ to do so).

My ideal outcome is that the park service open one of the actively farmed fields for goose hunting and use the permit/reservation process managed by the wildlife office to mitigate any user conflicts. I'd also like to see those waterblinds brought back to life. I'm willing to request a meeting with the park service to see if something can be worked out, and share in the grunt work.


Looks like the "horsey crowd" has pretty much taken over the park - - -


Image

The best spot, in my past experience it the north peninsula where the blue trail loop is.

There used to be a substantial pit in that field, but I do not see it on the sat shots now, wonder what hapopened to it ?

There are plenty of trails for riding, no reason they could not close that loop of the blue trail for goose season.

How much money would it take to bush hog that field, Roundup it, and broadcast millet and other small grains - - - after the first year you could legally bush hog or mow it before goose season.

I know Greenwell has some equipment - - - and the park must have some budget

According to the state map there is goose hunting there - - -

Image

http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Publiclands/pdfs/greenwellSPHuntingAreamap.pdf

Here is the most recent sat shot - - - Scott, does this look like what you saw ?

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=hollywood+md&hl=en&ll=38.370699,-76.529796&spn=0.009757,0.019205&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=40.27343,78.662109&vpsrc=6&hnear=Hollywood,+6,+Patuxent,+St+Mary's,+Maryland&t=h&z=16
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Crow Bait » Thu Jan 05, 2012 11:56 am

Bob,

Everything to the North of the Brown Trail is 3-5 years gone. I talked to the Park Service Folks @ Point Lookout and they told me that the fields had also been planted in tree seedlings by the "forest brigade" once the farming lease expired. These areas are all way past bushhoggable, and since the state spent money planting seedlings - I'm sure it's a non-starter. What's lost is lost. I found it interesting that the areas of the Orange, and Green trails are still actively farmed (where hunting has historically not been permitted). I can't recall what I saw on the white trail side.

In talking to a few folks, and doing some research I believe this land was "reforested" as part of the Maryland Reforestation Law - (http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/prog ... forest.asp) I'm told that all public lands are being targeted once the agricultural leases expire.

Here's some info on the law:

When highway construction using State funds causes the cutting or clearing of forests lands, the Maryland Reforestation Law requires that these trees be replaced. While construction activities by private citizens don't fall under this law, the impact of the Maryland Reforestation Law on the statewide greenscape cover is huge.

Replacement of forest cleared for highway construction must be accomplished on an acre-for-acre, one to one ratio on public lands and within a year of the completion of the project. Attempting to locate reforestation sites within the same county or watershed as the impacted area is given the first priority. If this is not possible the constructing agent (usually SHA) must deposit into the Reforestation Fund, ten cents per square foot or $4,356 per acre for the total cleared area. This fund is used by the Maryland DNR to plant replacement trees on public lands such as schools and parks.

Since being enacted in 1989, 2173 acres of forested land have been cleared by highway construction and 2487 acres have been replanted for a net gain of 314 acres (figures through 2005). As you can see the Maryland Reforestation Law plays a big role in mitigating the loss of forest cover due to highway construction. This is a win/win situation: we improve our transportation system and maintain our greenscape.


I am 100% for forests, but it seems like there could have been wiser decisions made in this case, and I doubt there was any public input on where to/not to reforest. In this regard, I fear that all of our public lands are at risk of going this way. It is sad considering how much money hunters put into public land with licenses and excise taxes on equipment. I can't imagine that anyone will get a better experience in parks/public lands that are just barren fields of bullrush and thorns for the next 15 years.

I hope that we can get a voice on how these reforestation projects are chosen in the future.
-S
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby nickb1414 » Thu Jan 05, 2012 2:33 pm

Crow Bait wrote:Bob,

Everything to the North of the Brown Trail is 3-5 years gone. I talked to the Park Service Folks @ Point Lookout and they told me that the fields had also been planted in tree seedlings by the "forest brigade" once the farming lease expired. These areas are all way past bushhoggable, and since the state spent money planting seedlings - I'm sure it's a non-starter. What's lost is lost. I found it interesting that the areas of the Orange, and Green trails are still actively farmed (where hunting has historically not been permitted). I can't recall what I saw on the white trail side.

In talking to a few folks, and doing some research I believe this land was "reforested" as part of the Maryland Reforestation Law - (http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/prog ... forest.asp) I'm told that all public lands are being targeted once the agricultural leases expire.

Here's some info on the law:

When highway construction using State funds causes the cutting or clearing of forests lands, the Maryland Reforestation Law requires that these trees be replaced. While construction activities by private citizens don't fall under this law, the impact of the Maryland Reforestation Law on the statewide greenscape cover is huge.

Replacement of forest cleared for highway construction must be accomplished on an acre-for-acre, one to one ratio on public lands and within a year of the completion of the project. Attempting to locate reforestation sites within the same county or watershed as the impacted area is given the first priority. If this is not possible the constructing agent (usually SHA) must deposit into the Reforestation Fund, ten cents per square foot or $4,356 per acre for the total cleared area. This fund is used by the Maryland DNR to plant replacement trees on public lands such as schools and parks.

Since being enacted in 1989, 2173 acres of forested land have been cleared by highway construction and 2487 acres have been replanted for a net gain of 314 acres (figures through 2005). As you can see the Maryland Reforestation Law plays a big role in mitigating the loss of forest cover due to highway construction. This is a win/win situation: we improve our transportation system and maintain our greenscape.


I am 100% for forests, but it seems like there could have been wiser decisions made in this case, and I doubt there was any public input on where to/not to reforest. In this regard, I fear that all of our public lands are at risk of going this way. It is sad considering how much money hunters put into public land with licenses and excise taxes on equipment. I can't imagine that anyone will get a better experience in parks/public lands that are just barren fields of bullrush and thorns for the next 15 years.

I hope that we can get a voice on how these reforestation projects are chosen in the future.
-S


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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Bay Bob » Thu Jan 05, 2012 3:14 pm

Crow Bait wrote:Bob,

Everything to the North of the Brown Trail is 3-5 years gone. I talked to the Park Service Folks @ Point Lookout and they told me that the fields had also been planted in tree seedlings by the "forest brigade" once the farming lease expired. These areas are all way past bushhoggable, and since the state spent money planting seedlings - I'm sure it's a non-starter. What's lost is lost. I found it interesting that the areas of the Orange, and Green trails are still actively farmed (where hunting has historically not been permitted). I can't recall what I saw on the white trail side.

In talking to a few folks, and doing some research I believe this land was "reforested" as part of the Maryland Reforestation Law - (http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/prog ... forest.asp) I'm told that all public lands are being targeted once the agricultural leases expire.

Here's some info on the law:

When highway construction using State funds causes the cutting or clearing of forests lands, the Maryland Reforestation Law requires that these trees be replaced. While construction activities by private citizens don't fall under this law, the impact of the Maryland Reforestation Law on the statewide greenscape cover is huge.

Replacement of forest cleared for highway construction must be accomplished on an acre-for-acre, one to one ratio on public lands and within a year of the completion of the project. Attempting to locate reforestation sites within the same county or watershed as the impacted area is given the first priority. If this is not possible the constructing agent (usually SHA) must deposit into the Reforestation Fund, ten cents per square foot or $4,356 per acre for the total cleared area. This fund is used by the Maryland DNR to plant replacement trees on public lands such as schools and parks.

Since being enacted in 1989, 2173 acres of forested land have been cleared by highway construction and 2487 acres have been replanted for a net gain of 314 acres (figures through 2005). As you can see the Maryland Reforestation Law plays a big role in mitigating the loss of forest cover due to highway construction. This is a win/win situation: we improve our transportation system and maintain our greenscape.


I am 100% for forests, but it seems like there could have been wiser decisions made in this case, and I doubt there was any public input on where to/not to reforest. In this regard, I fear that all of our public lands are at risk of going this way. It is sad considering how much money hunters put into public land with licenses and excise taxes on equipment. I can't imagine that anyone will get a better experience in parks/public lands that are just barren fields of bullrush and thorns for the next 15 years.

I hope that we can get a voice on how these reforestation projects are chosen in the future.
-S


Thanks Scott - - - I have not been off the road there in several years - - -

That is a sad situation and part of the reason why we have fewer and fewer birds on the western shore - - - the decline in agriculture and the lack of waste grain - - -

So the state makes more deer habitat - - -like we need more deer - - - I think if you check deeply into this the proximity to the river and subsequently the bay is what drive much of this reforestation work - - -

I like trees as much as the next guy - - - but there ain't much for a duck or goose to eat in the forest - - -

We really missed the boat on this one - - -
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Bareyacuda » Thu Jan 05, 2012 3:35 pm

I hunted greenwell in the past and had pretty good luck there. The pit was gone when I first hunted it back around 05 or so. I missed the last 2 seasons and also found the fields over grown this year. Did the same called point look out md got the forest statement but not because agriculture lease was up, they told me no one hunted geese there. Not so. Anyway I am glad I came upon this website. Not to fond of having to reserve a site to hunt, liked greenwell I could get off work early run home change grab my gear and go, no reservation required.
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Re: Greenwell State Park Goose Fields (historical)

Postby Crow Bait » Thu Jan 05, 2012 4:06 pm

Thanks for the data point Bareyacuda! I can't believe that I missed out on these opportunities.

I totally understand that walk-in opportunities can match our lifestyles easier, but I was thinking that using the reservation/permit system because the horse crowd is going to be reluctant to let us in there. On top of that, the "Nobody uses it" excuse would have been easily refuted if the old fields had been on the reservation/permit system. That was just a convenient excuse and it was done before anyone noticed.
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