Recipes

From the Berkshires to Cape Cod, Here is the place for the Bay State waterfowler to discuss and share their Massachusetts duck hunting experiences.

Moderators: captainkevan, JoeP, Tim D, MIKE J., HeritageHunter

Recipes

Postby scottywannaquacker » Sat Apr 07, 2012 7:39 pm

Hey guys, I'm making this thread for one to find out the best recipes, and second, there is no way any bickering can be started. So, how do you guys like to cook you duck, goose, venison, fish...etc :thumbsup:
scottywannaquacker
hunter
 
Posts: 149
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2011 5:21 pm


Re: Recipes

Postby Mike M. » Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:48 pm

sea duck kabobs on the grill

For those of you that think sea ducks are not good to eat try this one. It's a little bit of work but is worth it.

take some eider duck breast (or scoter, oldsquaw or any other strong flavored duck) and and soak in a saltwater mixture in a bowl, draining the salt water every 12 hours for 2 days in the fridge.

Next, cut up the eider duck breasts into small cubes and place in a ziplock bag. Add worcestershire sauce as your marinate and marinate duck meat in bag in fridge for 24 hours.

Put a number of slices of bacon (however many you think you will need to wrap each piece of duck) in the microwave for 45 seconds. This is just to start the cooking process. I use turkey bacon so you may have to experiment with regular bacon.

Next, time duck meat out of bag. Cut up a few bell peppers into bite size pieces. Do the same with some onion. Wrap a small piece of bacon around each piece of duck and put the whole thing on a cooking skewer.

Fire up the grill and put the whole skewer with bacon wrapped duck, bell pepper and onion on the grill. When the bacon is done, the duck is done.

DO NOT OVERCOOK THE DUCK. I repeat. Do not overcook your duck meat. Duck should be medium to medium rare. This is the best sea duck recipe I've used to date. It tastes good and I have even been able to get family members who are not into eating game to try this and actually go back for seconds.

Serve with rice pilaf and your choice of vegetable.
A serious reduction in the population of black ducks would mean the end of waterfowl hunting for the majority of the New England sportsmen.

Rachel Carson, 1947
User avatar
Mike M.
hunter
 
Posts: 686
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2005 9:09 am
Location: MA

Re: Recipes

Postby Mike M. » Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:55 pm

Easy crock pot recipe. Works well with puddle ducks. I got this one from a friend of mine.

Cube up a few duck breasts after 3 days in salt water (changed daily).

Added 1 or 2 big portabella mushroom caps (sliced into strips) into the crock pot, 1 package of the dried brown gravey seasoning, lots of fresh cracked pepper, some garlic, and 4 cans of cream of mushroom soup- I used healthy request reduced sodium, most of a can of french fried onions, and crock potted it on low all day then served it on top of egg noodles

It's pretty good and pretty easy
A serious reduction in the population of black ducks would mean the end of waterfowl hunting for the majority of the New England sportsmen.

Rachel Carson, 1947
User avatar
Mike M.
hunter
 
Posts: 686
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2005 9:09 am
Location: MA

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Sun Apr 08, 2012 9:11 am

Scotty,

Flour and fry, you can't go wrong! :thumbsup:

Chef
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby JTR » Sun Apr 08, 2012 10:00 am

I agree. For puddle ducks, I cut into thin strips, dredge them in seasoned flour and pan fry them in butter. Next to some eggs and a bagel for breakfast, you can't get much better.

It is also tough to beat any duck breast stuffed with jalapenos and cream cheese and wrapped in bacon.

My favorite recipe so far is Emerils chicken marsala, substituting pounded goose tenderloins or duck breasts, and served over buttered egg noodles.

Goose breasts get made into jerky using the Alton Brown recipe, with minor adjustments, depending on how I want them to come out.

It is tough to do much with plain sea duck, but it is good in a stew. Just throw some onions, carrots and potatoes on the bottom of a crock pot. Then put in your sea duck or goose, cut into 1 inch cubes. Pour in a few cans of beef broth to cover everything and a couple of bay leaves. Set it on low for 8-12 hours and you are good to go.

Ruger gets the frames and sometimes the legs. Although, if you have a bunch of duck legs, there are some really good recipes. I have found that the crock pot is your best friend when cooking game. Almost everything that comes out of it is tender. Just don't cook it on too high of a heat and remember that it is tough to over cook things on it. However, if you don't cook some stuff long enough, it will be fully cooked, but tough and not tender.
Ruger's Retrieves: I lost count
JTR
hunter
 
Posts: 1456
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:47 am
Location: Scituate, MA

Re: Recipes

Postby HeritageHunter » Sun Apr 08, 2012 10:40 am

For venison I take a dutch oven and sear the 2" cubed meat very quickly with some oil. (2mins at most) Add some quartered onions, peppers, and garlic and cook for another 2 mins.

Then add 1 16oz bottle of your favorite BBQ sauce and 1 16oz can of low salt beef broth.

The whole thing goes in the oven at 300 degrees for at least an hour.

Serve over rice or egg noddles.

This is by far the easist recipe I have used and it tastes great. I like Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce but what ever is your favorite should do the trick.
Keep the tradition alive and take a kid hunting!!!!

Honor our soldiers. Their sacrifice has given us our freedom.
User avatar
HeritageHunter
State Moderator
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:40 am
Location: Southern NH

Re: Recipes

Postby Professor_Leakey » Thu May 03, 2012 9:26 am

Mojo Grilled Turkey

marinade:

With a mortar and pestle, grind into a paste:
15 cloves garlic
12 black peppercorns

Put the paste into a bowl and add:
1 cup orange juice
½ cup lemon juice
½ cup lime juice
½ cup olive oil
2 tsp salt
2 tsp ground cumin
2 tsp oregano
1 tsp onion powder

mix well...heat the marinade til just before boiling then allow to cool.


cut turkey breast into 1 inch thick strips and soak in the marinade overnight.

cook over hot coals. do not overcook!!

i cook mine for about 4-5 minutes per side
I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.
User avatar
Professor_Leakey
hunter
 
Posts: 1943
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:40 pm
Location: MASS

Re: Recipes

Postby cut'emalljack » Thu May 03, 2012 11:30 am

Der Chef wrote:Scotty,

Flour and fry, you can't go wrong! :thumbsup:

Chef


You don't know what you're talking about! And with "Chef" in your name... :boxing:

Sorry Scotty... couldn't help it! :biggrin:
Cut'em
"Spot burning is for novice duck hunters, cyber scouters and pot-stirrers"

Proud member of Team FYG NEWTON
cut'emalljack
hunter
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:09 am
Location: West of the river...

Re: Recipes

Postby cut'emalljack » Thu May 03, 2012 11:33 am

JTR wrote:It is tough to do much with plain sea duck, but it is good in a stew. Just throw some onions, carrots and potatoes on the bottom of a crock pot. Then put in your sea duck or goose, cut into 1 inch cubes. Pour in a few cans of beef broth to cover everything and a couple of bay leaves. Set it on low for 8-12 hours and you are good to go.


You then eat the crock pot, right?
Cut'em
"Spot burning is for novice duck hunters, cyber scouters and pot-stirrers"

Proud member of Team FYG NEWTON
cut'emalljack
hunter
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:09 am
Location: West of the river...

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Thu May 03, 2012 11:42 am

Oh garsh cut'em,

You got your recipes confused. You eat the crock pot when you use that recipe for coots. :lol3:

Chef - (more than one meaning...)
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby cut'emalljack » Thu May 03, 2012 11:53 am

Der Chef wrote:Oh garsh cut'em,

You got your recipes confused. You eat the crock pot when you use that recipe for coots. :lol3:

Chef - (more than one meaning...)


Chef,

The coot recipe is to grind it up, feed it to the cat, then eat the cat! :thumbsup:
Cut'em
"Spot burning is for novice duck hunters, cyber scouters and pot-stirrers"

Proud member of Team FYG NEWTON
cut'emalljack
hunter
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:09 am
Location: West of the river...

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Thu May 03, 2012 12:00 pm

Well fine cut'em.

But how do you get a cat to eat a coot? :lol3:

Chef
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby cut'emalljack » Thu May 03, 2012 12:05 pm

Der Chef wrote:Well fine cut'em.

But how do you get a cat to eat a coot? :lol3:

Chef


See JTR's recipe above for seaducks, although next season the easiest solution is for you to not shoot the coot. I'd say that Edog shouldn't shoot 'em, but we both know he can't hit anything!
Cut'em
"Spot burning is for novice duck hunters, cyber scouters and pot-stirrers"

Proud member of Team FYG NEWTON
cut'emalljack
hunter
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:09 am
Location: West of the river...

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Thu May 03, 2012 12:17 pm

Hey HH,

Read your recipe for venison. How do you tell what kinda meat is in there with all that stuff? :lol3:

Just kiddin' Rob, I'll bet it's yummy. :thumbsup:

JTR, on a more serious note, a good alternative to the crock pot method for tough cuts and sometimes barely edible game is the ole pressure cooker. Cheap to buy, they give you similar results in very little time. Nothing escapes the pot except the "tough" part and for some reason the "nasty" flavors.

Our on-site Brazilian chef, butcher and all 'round good guy Marcos has made a few ethnic dishes with sea ducks, coots and all manner of "secondary" choices. Amazing how good some of these dishes turn out where the "product" can still be tasted and there's no urge to puke. :lol3:

Anybody out there using this method knows what I'm talkin' about.

Give it a try. :thumbsup:

Chef
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby cut'emalljack » Thu May 03, 2012 12:28 pm

Der Chef wrote:Hey HH,

Read your recipe for venison. How do you tell what kinda meat is in there with all that stuff? :lol3:


Chef


I was kinda thinking the same thing about Leakey's turkey recipe with 15 cloves of garlic!

Prof, isn't that a little over the top?
Cut'em
"Spot burning is for novice duck hunters, cyber scouters and pot-stirrers"

Proud member of Team FYG NEWTON
cut'emalljack
hunter
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:09 am
Location: West of the river...

Re: Recipes

Postby Professor_Leakey » Thu May 03, 2012 2:35 pm

not really, no. it is a marinade. garlic is good...use more or less to suit your taste
I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.
User avatar
Professor_Leakey
hunter
 
Posts: 1943
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:40 pm
Location: MASS

Re: Recipes

Postby HeritageHunter » Thu May 03, 2012 3:48 pm

Professor_Leakey wrote:not really, no. it is a marinade. garlic is good...use more or less to suit your taste



I was thinking the same thing. 15 cloves is a lot but with all the citrus and it being a marinade (Plus i love garlic) going a little heavy makes sense. I was also thinking of maybe adding a couple of Jalapenos or Serrano chilis to Leakey's recipe to give it some heat. Kinda like a Jamacian jerk recipe.
Keep the tradition alive and take a kid hunting!!!!

Honor our soldiers. Their sacrifice has given us our freedom.
User avatar
HeritageHunter
State Moderator
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:40 am
Location: Southern NH

Re: Recipes

Postby HeritageHunter » Thu May 03, 2012 4:19 pm

Der Chef wrote:Hey HH,

Read your recipe for venison. How do you tell what kinda meat is in there with all that stuff? :lol3:

Just kiddin' Rob, I'll bet it's yummy. :thumbsup: Chef


It definetly covers up a lot of the game taste, butis a good recipe to get people to try venison.

Another way to tweak it is cut the broth in 1/2 and cook it for 2 hrs. When doen shred the meat and you have "pulled" venison sandwiches!!!
Keep the tradition alive and take a kid hunting!!!!

Honor our soldiers. Their sacrifice has given us our freedom.
User avatar
HeritageHunter
State Moderator
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:40 am
Location: Southern NH

Re: Recipes

Postby Professor_Leakey » Thu May 03, 2012 4:22 pm

it's pretty good for porcupine, too.
I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.
User avatar
Professor_Leakey
hunter
 
Posts: 1943
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:40 pm
Location: MASS

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Thu May 03, 2012 4:24 pm

I don't know you guys, this is gettin' a little out of hand. :lol3:

Wild turkey, delicate, juicy, nutty flavor with hot peppers and garlic? With a great product like this (fresh wild turkey), conventional wisdom dictates that you let it shine on it's own, with little fuss. Simple is better with a great find like this.

Don't get me wrong here, I love garlic and peppers too, but I wouldn't put 'em on ice cream, or put ketchup on a truffle. :no:

To each his own, I say!

Enjoy, however you may!

:beer:

Der Chef
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby Professor_Leakey » Thu May 03, 2012 4:28 pm

backyard turkey meat must be especially nutty....from eating all the bird seed :lol3:

lots of ways to enjoy it, as long as it isnt overcooked.
I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.
User avatar
Professor_Leakey
hunter
 
Posts: 1943
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:40 pm
Location: MASS

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Thu May 03, 2012 7:02 pm

It definetly covers up a lot of the game taste, butis a good recipe to get people to try venison. - Heritagehunter

Rob, I’m glad you brought this up. I’m going to attempt to clarify this. It’s not a myth that deer here in the states often tastes “gamy”. A blue fish cooked in it’s own oil is also disgusting. With a little background, here’s why…

It has to do with butchering, preparation and cooking method.

My family is from Bavaria, and we visit friends there and in southern Austria pretty regularly. We never eat beef there, always deer, because it’s preferred, superior even to “wagyu” in most cases. I have been eating Hirsch (deer) all my life. My family has owned slaughter houses here and in Europe for generations, to this day.

The “gamy” taste you refer to is caused by improper prep or butchering. Most hunters here will peel the animal, cut it up and freeze it. Properly, it should be peeled, stripped of ALL fat, halved and aged (cool, dry, less than 45 or so degrees) for at least 10 days if you want to get the best from it. :thumbsup:

If ANY of the internals are damaged in the hunt, it should be butchered immediately, i.e, back straps, hams and tenderloins. It can spoil in less than an hour otherwise, hence “gamy” flavor. You will also get this unpleasant taste if you let it cook in it’s own fat. Goat and lamb, same thing. No good restaurant will serve lamb, unless the fell and fat have been removed before cooking. Pork and beef benefit from cooking with fat, but these animals do not.

Simple preps, seasoning and cooking method bring out the best in the better cuts, slow braising for the rest.

If it needs a lot of spices and such to make it palatable, I’d suggests you may have missed a step or two.

Just my experience, I hope you find it helpful.

Der Chef
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby HeritageHunter » Fri May 04, 2012 12:35 pm

I was fortunate when growing up to have a butcher in our hunting group as well. He taught me a lot about meat prep and proper technique when butchering deer.

I don't think "gamey" is a bad thing. It is IMO the difference you get in taste from a farm raised animal and a wild one. I know that deer from the mid-west that are mostly feeding on grain and corn taste very different than deer from Northeast that rely on a mast crop driven diet. I have heard the same is true for fish like salmon for instance.

Typically we dress, skin, and hang for one day, if the weather permits. If it is warm we stuff the cavity full of ice and hang. Reason for the hanging is to allow the blood the chance to drain out. Blood and fat can give an "off" taste to venison.

I do not dry age my deer. I know some do but my experince is one very often we shoot deer in warm weather, two you need the correct humidty, and air flow to facilitate, and three a good location to do it.

The goal of dry ageing is to reduce the water content of the meat to further increase the concentration of flavor. IMO venison does not need any concentration. I prefer a wet age process done with a vacuum seal. I cut seal, and let it refrigerate for a few days. This draws out any remaining blood, and allows the meat's enzimes to break it down farther and help tenderize it.
Last edited by HeritageHunter on Fri May 04, 2012 2:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Mis-spelling
Keep the tradition alive and take a kid hunting!!!!

Honor our soldiers. Their sacrifice has given us our freedom.
User avatar
HeritageHunter
State Moderator
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:40 am
Location: Southern NH

Re: Recipes

Postby Der Chef » Fri May 04, 2012 1:54 pm

Some interesting concepts there Rob. Thanks! :thumbsup:
~Der Chef~
TEAM SNEAK ATTACK !!!!!!
Der Chef
hunter
 
Posts: 834
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:12 pm

Re: Recipes

Postby Professor_Leakey » Sun Jun 10, 2012 3:11 pm

I decided to try making crab cakes for the first time today and they turned out really well.

1 large potato
4 green onions chopped
2 Tb butter
1 Tb chopped garlic
5 slices of bacon
The meat from 5 Blue Crab
1 egg yolk
Japanese style Panko breadcrumbs
Old Bay seasoning

Bake the potato and put it in the fridge to cool down.

Lay 5 slices of bacon on a baking sheet and liberally dust it with Old Bay seasoning. Bake in the oven at 350 flipping occasionally until it is nice and crispy, 20 minutes or so to make what I call Old-Baycon.

Set it aside, up high so the dog or kids don’t get it. When it cools down, chop it up into small bits.

Take the cooled down potato from the fridge and scrape it out into a bowl. Melt the butter in a skillet and add the chopped garlic. Cook for just a couple minutes until the butter starts bubbling and then add the garlic butter to the potato. Add the chopped bacon and mix up well.

In a large bowl mix together the old baycon garlic potato mixture, chopped green onions, crab meat, and then salt to taste. Add an egg yolk to moisten and mix well…this will make the panko crumbs stick. Form into small patties or balls and then coat heavily with panko crumbs. Fry these in a skillet until golden brown on all sides.



This is very good served with an over-easy egg and garnished with chopped green onions.
Attachments
crab balls.JPG
I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.
User avatar
Professor_Leakey
hunter
 
Posts: 1943
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:40 pm
Location: MASS

Next

Return to Massachusetts Duck Hunting

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests