Building a Pond with a Pump

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Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby C.J. » Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:32 am

we have a 10 acre field on the river, its surrounded by ridges besides the river frontage, we are thinking about digging out a levy and flooding the area with a pump from the river, the field is flat so we could drain and plant corn in the area and flood it, this is in NW GA so no one else has flooded corn in the area, thoughts on this? how do I know if the soil will hold water?
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby WIDrakeKiller » Mon Dec 10, 2012 12:20 pm

Take a skid steer start moving dirt and see what happens.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby ByersFarm » Mon Dec 10, 2012 12:58 pm

C.J. wrote:we have a 10 acre field on the river, its surrounded by ridges besides the river frontage, we are thinking about digging out a levy and flooding the area with a pump from the river, the field is flat so we could drain and plant corn in the area and flood it, this is in NW GA so no one else has flooded corn in the area, thoughts on this? how do I know if the soil will hold water?

Chances are that if you're in a river bottom it won't hold that well. The plus is that you have plenty of cheap water. There is an app from apple that will tell you your soil type wherever you are. The description will tell you about holding water.
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Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby NuffDaddy » Mon Dec 10, 2012 7:36 pm

Build up a little dike rent a pump and start filling. I it gets wet then your good to go.


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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby Boatman » Mon Dec 10, 2012 7:47 pm

Be careful that's not legal without a permit. You need a well.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby dakotashooter2 » Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:58 am

Boatman wrote:Be careful that's not legal without a permit. You need a well.



Check your state regs Some require permits if you want to pump significant amounts of water from a river. If it's for ag purposes they may require a well as stated above.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby C.J. » Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:13 am

Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby MarkM » Thu Nov 21, 2013 11:09 am

Contact your local Ag extension office. They can tell you how well it will work in that area and what you need.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby WoodyWhiffingMG » Thu Nov 21, 2013 12:25 pm

C.J. wrote:Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.


I don't think that will hold water well... clay is what you want.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby ArkansasRobertson » Thu Nov 21, 2013 12:46 pm

C.J. wrote:we have a 10 acre field on the river, its surrounded by ridges besides the river frontage, we are thinking about digging out a levy and flooding the area with a pump from the river, the field is flat so we could drain and plant corn in the area and flood it, this is in NW GA so no one else has flooded corn in the area, thoughts on this? how do I know if the soil will hold water?


Depends completely on the type of soil.

Generally you have to determine the soil.
Here is what I use at work. Locate your property and determine the soil types and let me know. This is more of an ok estimate

http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/HomePage.htm
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby LongTom » Thu Nov 21, 2013 1:09 pm

Contact your NRCS office, their help is free and they can answer the question about the soil type. My bet is they already mapped your soil years ago and will make recommendations. The NRCS will assist with surveying also.
Use these links.
Georgia soil mapping NRCS
http://soils.usda.gov/

Georgia Natural Resources Conservation Service home page
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/ga/home/

Another option is to get partial funding from the USFWS, NRCS can help get you in touch with them. The biggest thing is don't go at it blind, there is to much involved. The resources at hand can be the difference between a good project and a bust.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby Huntfish12 » Thu Nov 21, 2013 8:35 pm

http://www.goosehuntingchat.com/forum/v ... 10&t=22112
This might help. Not so much for planting anything then flooding it but mabye something to point you in the right direction
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby MODuckkiller » Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:22 pm

C.J. wrote:Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.

I hate this for you, but moderately sandy soil is not what you need; it's actually the most un-ideal scenario for you. A sandy soil's permeability is very high, and porosity is almost nonexistent. This means that water flows through it easily and it is not good at holding(retaining) water.

Like Woody said earlier, you want a clay soil. Clay has an extremely low permeability and a very high porosity. Water doesn't flow through it well, and it can hold an extremely large quantity of water (relative to size) in the pore spaces between clay particles.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby LongTom » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:25 am

MODuckkiller wrote:
C.J. wrote:Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.

I hate this for you, but moderately sandy soil is not what you need; it's actually the most un-ideal scenario for you. A sandy soil's permeability is very high, and porosity is almost nonexistent. This means that water flows through it easily and it is not good at holding(retaining) water.

Like Woody said earlier, you want a clay soil. Clay has an extremely low permeability and a very high porosity. Water doesn't flow through it well, and it can hold an extremely large quantity of water (relative to size) in the pore spaces between clay particles.


Porosity is the space between particles, permeability is the ability for liquid or gas to flow through the spaces. Just because it is sandy doesn't mean it wouldn't make a good duck pond. 1. it could have a nonporous soil just below the surface. 2. Beside the river it could have a high water table and even if the soil has a high perk rate it may still take the water a long time to dissipate. 3. If it has even a one acre spot that can be flooded, an acre of water in the middle of 10 acres of feed can be a good place to kill a lot of birds.
Don't get your advice from this site, go to NRCS and use their professional help. That is what they are there for.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby C.J. » Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:18 am

To—Toccoa fine sandy loam
Map Unit Setting
Elevation: 470 to 1,500 feet
Mean annual precipitation: 44 to 60 inches
Mean annual air temperature: 59 to 64 degrees F
Frost-free period: 190 to 230 days
Map Unit Composition
Toccoa and similar soils: 100 percent
Description of Toccoa
Setting
Landform: Flood plains
Down-slope shape: Linear
Across-slope shape: Linear
Parent material: Alluvium
Properties and qualities
Slope: 0 to 2 percent
Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches
Drainage class: Moderately well drained
Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): High (1.98
to 5.95 in/hr)
Depth to water table: About 30 to 60 inches
Frequency of flooding: Occasional
Frequency of ponding: None
Available water capacity: Moderate (about 6.6 inches)
Interpretive groups
Farmland classification: Farmland of statewide importance
Land capability (nonirrigated): 2w
Hydrologic Soil Group: B
Typical profile
0 to 8 inches: Fine sandy loam
8 to 74 inches: Sandy loam
Data Source Information
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby C.J. » Fri Nov 22, 2013 10:19 am

it says most of it is Toccoa Fine Sandy loam
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby ArkansasRobertson » Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:29 pm

C.J. wrote:it says most of it is Toccoa Fine Sandy loam


Hydrologic Soil group B is not good for holding water.

Also, having a layer of just sand below your fine sandy loam is not good. Sand does not compact as easily as clayer soils. You need some compacted clay about 5 feet under your sandy mix on top.

Out here in arkansas. The flooded rice fields are PERFECTly leveled. They are on Clay that HOLDS water. Its cheap. There, where you got sand and hills. There gonna be a lot of earth work. You might just need to put lots of focus on a small section of it being flooded and put a layer of clay down
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Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby TXducksanddeer » Fri Nov 22, 2013 4:43 pm

My suggestion is to get someone who has done this before to help you. We have a guy that's working on one of are leaking tanks right now by putting more clay down.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby rank duck » Sat Nov 23, 2013 5:42 pm

C.J. wrote:..
Frequency of ponding: None
..


I think that's your answer right there.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby waterfowlman » Sat Nov 23, 2013 5:47 pm

Plond.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby WisconsinWaterfowler » Sat Nov 23, 2013 5:49 pm

waterfowlman wrote:Plond.


Beat me to it
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby MODuckkiller » Sun Nov 24, 2013 12:53 pm

LongTom wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:
C.J. wrote:Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.

I hate this for you, but moderately sandy soil is not what you need; it's actually the most un-ideal scenario for you. A sandy soil's permeability is very high, and porosity is almost nonexistent. This means that water flows through it easily and it is not good at holding(retaining) water.

Like Woody said earlier, you want a clay soil. Clay has an extremely low permeability and a very high porosity. Water doesn't flow through it well, and it can hold an extremely large quantity of water (relative to size) in the pore spaces between clay particles.


Porosity is the space between particles, permeability is the ability for liquid or gas to flow through the spaces. Just because it is sandy doesn't mean it wouldn't make a good duck pond. 1. it could have a nonporous soil just below the surface. 2. Beside the river it could have a high water table and even if the soil has a high perk rate it may still take the water a long time to dissipate. 3. If it has even a one acre spot that can be flooded, an acre of water in the middle of 10 acres of feed can be a good place to kill a lot of birds.
Don't get your advice from this site, go to NRCS and use their professional help. That is what they are there for.

Please don't attempt to correct me and then define words in your correction that I had already previously defined in my original post and base your correction of my post on nothing more than assumptions. I am not pursuing a minor or 'focus' in hydrogeology on a mere whim.
HE said the soil was sandy and nothing of the water table (from what I read), so I told him what that meant from a geological standpoint.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby Underradar » Sun Nov 24, 2013 1:25 pm

Line your pond with drilling mud to seal the sand. It will hold water forever.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby LongTom » Sun Nov 24, 2013 4:38 pm

MODuckkiller wrote:
LongTom wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:
C.J. wrote:Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.

I hate this for you, but moderately sandy soil is not what you need; it's actually the most un-ideal scenario for you. A sandy soil's permeability is very high, and porosity is almost nonexistent. This means that water flows through it easily and it is not good at holding(retaining) water.

Like Woody said earlier, you want a clay soil. Clay has an extremely low permeability and a very high porosity. Water doesn't flow through it well, and it can hold an extremely large quantity of water (relative to size) in the pore spaces between clay particles.


Porosity is the space between particles, permeability is the ability for liquid or gas to flow through the spaces. Just because it is sandy doesn't mean it wouldn't make a good duck pond. 1. it could have a nonporous soil just below the surface. 2. Beside the river it could have a high water table and even if the soil has a high perk rate it may still take the water a long time to dissipate. 3. If it has even a one acre spot that can be flooded, an acre of water in the middle of 10 acres of feed can be a good place to kill a lot of birds.
Don't get your advice from this site, go to NRCS and use their professional help. That is what they are there for.

Please don't attempt to correct me and then define words in your correction that I had already previously defined in my original post and base your correction of my post on nothing more than assumptions. I am not pursuing a minor or 'focus' in hydrogeology on a mere whim.
HE said the soil was sandy and nothing of the water table (from what I read), so I told him what that meant from a geological standpoint.


Gladly, because I don't have enough time to correct the likes of your statement.
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Re: Building a Pond with a Pump

Postby MODuckkiller » Sun Nov 24, 2013 6:45 pm

LongTom wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:
LongTom wrote:
MODuckkiller wrote:
C.J. wrote:Wanted to get a few more opinions on this, I really think it could be a great setup, its moderatley sandy soil.

I hate this for you, but moderately sandy soil is not what you need; it's actually the most un-ideal scenario for you. A sandy soil's permeability is very high, and porosity is almost nonexistent. This means that water flows through it easily and it is not good at holding(retaining) water.

Like Woody said earlier, you want a clay soil. Clay has an extremely low permeability and a very high porosity. Water doesn't flow through it well, and it can hold an extremely large quantity of water (relative to size) in the pore spaces between clay particles.


Porosity is the space between particles, permeability is the ability for liquid or gas to flow through the spaces. Just because it is sandy doesn't mean it wouldn't make a good duck pond. 1. it could have a nonporous soil just below the surface. 2. Beside the river it could have a high water table and even if the soil has a high perk rate it may still take the water a long time to dissipate. 3. If it has even a one acre spot that can be flooded, an acre of water in the middle of 10 acres of feed can be a good place to kill a lot of birds.
Don't get your advice from this site, go to NRCS and use their professional help. That is what they are there for.

Please don't attempt to correct me and then define words in your correction that I had already previously defined in my original post and base your correction of my post on nothing more than assumptions. I am not pursuing a minor or 'focus' in hydrogeology on a mere whim.
HE said the soil was sandy and nothing of the water table (from what I read), so I told him what that meant from a geological standpoint.


Gladly, because I don't have the mental capacity to correct the likes of your statement.

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