Byers Farm Migration

Main forum for general non waterfowl discussions as well as general duck hunting information about travel, rules and regulations, and other duck hunting info along with the general topics.

Moderators: Tealer, Indaswamp, Dep6, La. Hunter, steve-o, #1wingnut, lostpup, Preacher1011

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby OGblackcloud » Wed Nov 20, 2013 9:22 am

MarkM wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:I'm not sure what the cause is. My guess would be injuries from being shot. It's the norm to see at least ten in every field they've roosted in overnight.

That is what happens when you shoot 7/8 oz of BB's out of a full choke going 1900 FPS from a Mossberg 935...

FIFY
User avatar
OGblackcloud
hunter
 
Posts: 14552
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 12:38 pm


Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby teddysberna » Wed Nov 20, 2013 9:25 am

:yes:
ByersFarm wrote:I'm not sure what the cause is. My guess would be injuries from being shot. It's the norm to see at least ten in every field they've roosted in overnight.



You check them for bands??
ByersFarm wrote:
Westtennduckhunter wrote:Sugar is a top secret place.

Sugar is a mythical place, with unicorns and sugar plum ferries. It's a majestic place. I mean moth8rf^@king majestic. Like a bald eagle getting a hand job from the statue of liberty herself.
User avatar
teddysberna
hunter
 
Posts: 5025
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 12:25 pm
Location: Georgetown KY

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby ByersFarm » Wed Nov 20, 2013 9:37 am

teddysberna wrote::yes:
ByersFarm wrote:I'm not sure what the cause is. My guess would be injuries from being shot. It's the norm to see at least ten in every field they've roosted in overnight.



You check them for bands??

I look at them if we are in the field, otherwise I don't go to the effort of tracking out there.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 13472
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby possumfoot » Wed Nov 20, 2013 10:55 am

my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..
WTN10 wrote:He was funny like a Pomeranian getting kicked over a fence.


pgquackstacker wrote:I actually started bringing a gun with me on dates, so I bring the girl's father out to my car and tell him if he tries to cock-block me I'll kill him.
User avatar
possumfoot
hunter
 
Posts: 5788
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 5:13 pm
Location: making sesbania my bitch

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby WoodyWhiffingMG » Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:24 am

possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?
There are only two types of people in the world, those who love duck hunting and those who never have duck hunted.
User avatar
WoodyWhiffingMG
hunter
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:30 pm
Location: Back in SW MICHIGAN

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby possumfoot » Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:35 am

cholera typicly only affects weak and old birds.. natural selection, but carried out by a bacteria.. as far as i can remeber, i have only ever seen cholera kills affect snows... weak and sick ducks are usually taken by hunters and other forms of predation.. with snows, the numbers game works overwhelmingly to their advantage..
WTN10 wrote:He was funny like a Pomeranian getting kicked over a fence.


pgquackstacker wrote:I actually started bringing a gun with me on dates, so I bring the girl's father out to my car and tell him if he tries to cock-block me I'll kill him.
User avatar
possumfoot
hunter
 
Posts: 5788
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 5:13 pm
Location: making sesbania my bitch

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby ByersFarm » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:16 pm

WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 13472
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:21 pm

ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby CrazyDrake » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:25 pm

Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.
User avatar
CrazyDrake
hunter
 
Posts: 370
Joined: Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:18 am
Location: West TN/N.E Arkansas

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby WoodyWhiffingMG » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:28 pm

ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.



If that is the case, why do they care if you release mallards?

Ignoring the chance of introduction of new pathogens, as longs as they are certified 'clean'.
There are only two types of people in the world, those who love duck hunting and those who never have duck hunted.
User avatar
WoodyWhiffingMG
hunter
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:30 pm
Location: Back in SW MICHIGAN

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:30 pm

CrazyDrake wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.

The problem is with the collateral damage to other species like specks and ducks mixed in with the snows using stuff like that. a line of 100 people armed with .22's from a ways away will be way more effective. far enough away so the shot does not spook them off the ground, yet close enough for the shots to be accurate. you could decimate a flock on the ground.
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:31 pm

WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.



If that is the case, why do they care if you release mallards?

Ignoring the chance of introduction of new pathogens, as longs as they are certified 'clean'.

Are you talkin about pen raised birds released on canned duck shoots?
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby WoodyWhiffingMG » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:35 pm

Indaswamp wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.



If that is the case, why do they care if you release mallards?

Ignoring the chance of introduction of new pathogens, as longs as they are certified 'clean'.

Are you talkin about pen raised birds released on canned duck shoots?


No, more like frost mallards...

Not really interested in doing it myself, but to tell someone they can't create their own waterfowl paradise by releasing mallards and citing a reason that equally applies and affects other operations who are not told no, is a little hypocritical is all.
There are only two types of people in the world, those who love duck hunting and those who never have duck hunted.
User avatar
WoodyWhiffingMG
hunter
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:30 pm
Location: Back in SW MICHIGAN

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:46 pm

WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.



If that is the case, why do they care if you release mallards?

Ignoring the chance of introduction of new pathogens, as longs as they are certified 'clean'.

Are you talkin about pen raised birds released on canned duck shoots?


No, more like frost mallards...

Not really interested in doing it myself, but to tell someone they can't create their own waterfowl paradise by releasing mallards and citing a reason that equally applies and affects other operations who are not told no, is a little hypocritical is all.

what is a 'frost mallard'?
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby WoodyWhiffingMG » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:50 pm

There are only two types of people in the world, those who love duck hunting and those who never have duck hunted.
User avatar
WoodyWhiffingMG
hunter
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:30 pm
Location: Back in SW MICHIGAN

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:55 pm

WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:http://www.frostwaterfowl.com/

yea...just what I said...canned release duck hunting:
Frost staff will provide consultation for Mallard Release Programs on your privately managed habitat. The long term goal of the program is to restore quality duck hunting and provide quality service. This Program has grown exponentially in the southeast with the greatest concentration of projects currently being in SC, MD, VA, and NC, with rapid expansion occurring in other southeastern states. This program is designed to let you experience duck hunting on your property that approaches wild duck hunting. If the release plan is properly executed you will experience just that, excellent duck hunting. The Frost Release System is a detailed step by step plan that also includes unlimited telephone support from our biologist for a period of one year. Frost is also available for on site consultation and can help with habitat design and implementation.
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Westtennduckhunter » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:57 pm

Indaswamp wrote:
CrazyDrake wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.

The problem is with the collateral damage to other species like specks and ducks mixed in with the snows using stuff like that. a line of 100 people armed with .22's from a ways away will be way more effective. far enough away so the shot does not spook them off the ground, yet close enough for the shots to be accurate. you could decimate a flock on the ground.


Remote controlled air planes.
teddysberna wrote:
whistlin_wings wrote:Did you get his autograph?

I thought about getting him to sign my cleavage, but decided against it at the last moment.
User avatar
Westtennduckhunter
hunter
 
Posts: 12927
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Memphis, tn

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 12:58 pm

Westtennduckhunter wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
CrazyDrake wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.

The problem is with the collateral damage to other species like specks and ducks mixed in with the snows using stuff like that. a line of 100 people armed with .22's from a ways away will be way more effective. far enough away so the shot does not spook them off the ground, yet close enough for the shots to be accurate. you could decimate a flock on the ground.


Remote controlled air planes.

that will herd them to guns...that's for sure.
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby teddysberna » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:00 pm

Westtennduckhunter wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
CrazyDrake wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.

The problem is with the collateral damage to other species like specks and ducks mixed in with the snows using stuff like that. a line of 100 people armed with .22's from a ways away will be way more effective. far enough away so the shot does not spook them off the ground, yet close enough for the shots to be accurate. you could decimate a flock on the ground.


Remote controlled air planes.



Heard a story from my buddy who hunts Arky every year that this scenario happened and some guys shot the schit out of them until they got busted... That would be a ton of fun while it lasted though...
ByersFarm wrote:
Westtennduckhunter wrote:Sugar is a top secret place.

Sugar is a mythical place, with unicorns and sugar plum ferries. It's a majestic place. I mean moth8rf^@king majestic. Like a bald eagle getting a hand job from the statue of liberty herself.
User avatar
teddysberna
hunter
 
Posts: 5025
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 12:25 pm
Location: Georgetown KY

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby WoodyWhiffingMG » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:00 pm

Indaswamp wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:http://www.frostwaterfowl.com/

yea...just what I said...canned release duck hunting:
Frost staff will provide consultation for Mallard Release Programs on your privately managed habitat. The long term goal of the program is to restore quality duck hunting and provide quality service. This Program has grown exponentially in the southeast with the greatest concentration of projects currently being in SC, MD, VA, and NC, with rapid expansion occurring in other southeastern states. This program is designed to let you experience duck hunting on your property that approaches wild duck hunting. If the release plan is properly executed you will experience just that, excellent duck hunting. The Frost Release System is a detailed step by step plan that also includes unlimited telephone support from our biologist for a period of one year. Frost is also available for on site consultation and can help with habitat design and implementation.


No, They claim they mimic wild ducks and will fly south, when you say canned I think of a "tower shoot"... but that is not what I am arguing. I don't think it is ethical, but I was just wondering why they would cite that as a problem if as Byers said, it is a natural phenomenon that can't be stopped.
There are only two types of people in the world, those who love duck hunting and those who never have duck hunted.
User avatar
WoodyWhiffingMG
hunter
 
Posts: 8653
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:30 pm
Location: Back in SW MICHIGAN

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:05 pm

WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:http://www.frostwaterfowl.com/

yea...just what I said...canned release duck hunting:
Frost staff will provide consultation for Mallard Release Programs on your privately managed habitat. The long term goal of the program is to restore quality duck hunting and provide quality service. This Program has grown exponentially in the southeast with the greatest concentration of projects currently being in SC, MD, VA, and NC, with rapid expansion occurring in other southeastern states. This program is designed to let you experience duck hunting on your property that approaches wild duck hunting. If the release plan is properly executed you will experience just that, excellent duck hunting. The Frost Release System is a detailed step by step plan that also includes unlimited telephone support from our biologist for a period of one year. Frost is also available for on site consultation and can help with habitat design and implementation.


No, They claim they mimic wild ducks and will fly south, when you say canned I think of a "tower shoot"... but that is not what I am arguing. I don't think it is ethical, but I was just wondering why they would cite that as a problem if as Byers said, it is a natural phenomenon that can't be stopped.

capable of flying south, and actually flying south are different. Most of the places I've seen do this sort of thing, the birds are local. It is legal to shoot release birds over bait. many of these places feed daily and the birds know where the feed is. The blinds are situated so you are shooting over the feed. ducks leave the local roost and fly to the feed, Bam-the clients shoot them.
Not my cup of tea for a duck hunt, but many in the SE do it.
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Westtennduckhunter » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:07 pm

teddysberna wrote:
Westtennduckhunter wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
CrazyDrake wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.

The problem is with the collateral damage to other species like specks and ducks mixed in with the snows using stuff like that. a line of 100 people armed with .22's from a ways away will be way more effective. far enough away so the shot does not spook them off the ground, yet close enough for the shots to be accurate. you could decimate a flock on the ground.


Remote controlled air planes.



Heard a story from my buddy who hunts Arky every year that this scenario happened and some guys shot the schit out of them until they got busted... That would be a ton of fun while it lasted though...


Used to be a video floating around I believe.
teddysberna wrote:
whistlin_wings wrote:Did you get his autograph?

I thought about getting him to sign my cleavage, but decided against it at the last moment.
User avatar
Westtennduckhunter
hunter
 
Posts: 12927
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Memphis, tn

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby KAhunter » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:46 pm

Indaswamp wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:http://www.frostwaterfowl.com/

yea...just what I said...canned release duck hunting:
Frost staff will provide consultation for Mallard Release Programs on your privately managed habitat. The long term goal of the program is to restore quality duck hunting and provide quality service. This Program has grown exponentially in the southeast with the greatest concentration of projects currently being in SC, MD, VA, and NC, with rapid expansion occurring in other southeastern states. This program is designed to let you experience duck hunting on your property that approaches wild duck hunting. If the release plan is properly executed you will experience just that, excellent duck hunting. The Frost Release System is a detailed step by step plan that also includes unlimited telephone support from our biologist for a period of one year. Frost is also available for on site consultation and can help with habitat design and implementation.


No, They claim they mimic wild ducks and will fly south, when you say canned I think of a "tower shoot"... but that is not what I am arguing. I don't think it is ethical, but I was just wondering why they would cite that as a problem if as Byers said, it is a natural phenomenon that can't be stopped.

Look they are cracking down on cyberscouting and skybusting in North Carolina. Give us a break. How else are we supposed to kill ducks.
capable of flying south, and actually flying south are different. Most of the places I've seen do this sort of thing, the birds are local. It is legal to shoot release birds over bait. many of these places feed daily and the birds know where the feed is. The blinds are situated so you are shooting over the feed. ducks leave the local roost and fly to the feed, Bam-the clients shoot them.
Not my cup of tea for a duck hunt, but many in the SE do it.
"If you have to be crazy to be a duck hunter, i dont wish to be sane" Robert Ruark

Its always duck season, there is just a long break from february to september.
KAhunter
hunter
 
Posts: 2015
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2005 9:11 am

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby ByersFarm » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:47 pm

teddysberna wrote:
Westtennduckhunter wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
CrazyDrake wrote:
Indaswamp wrote:
ByersFarm wrote:
WoodyWhiffingMG wrote:
possumfoot wrote:my guess would be a combo of shoot birds (probably making up the fewest dead birds), age, a weak strain of cholera, other diseases.. old birds die quick from cholera, it becomes a problem when infected birds live and continue to contaminate the area.. we usually have a cholera die off here once or twice a season..


I was wondering about this lately...

I was reading about releasing waterfowl and the concerns FWS has about it. Disease is the largest concern they have, and the overwhelming consensus is that disease is of highest concern because of the tendency for there to be large quantities of birds in limited space.

So, my question for them would have been, if that is the case why do large waterfowl operations (like WMAs, Hunt Clubs, etc...)not have this same issue?

Now after reading your post, my question for you, Byers, et' al (including the government WMAs and such) would be, do the befits provided to the waterfowl by your farms out way the risk of wide spread disease outbreak?


The only thing that can be done to stop them from grouping together in large flocks is to kill them all. They will group up whenever, and wherever they want. If I ran off the 400k+ that we have today, they would move on down the line and land somewhere else. Snow geese are a real concern, and more should be done to reduce their population.

I can be done, but they have set the rules in place to make it 'sporting'. they need to remove all the regs. that pertain to snows and the population would drop dramatically. Guns alone won't do it IMO....



I agree. I'd love to throw some hand grenades out in the middle of a big group! Maybe a land mine or two.

The problem is with the collateral damage to other species like specks and ducks mixed in with the snows using stuff like that. a line of 100 people armed with .22's from a ways away will be way more effective. far enough away so the shot does not spook them off the ground, yet close enough for the shots to be accurate. you could decimate a flock on the ground.


Remote controlled air planes.



Heard a story from my buddy who hunts Arky every year that this scenario happened and some guys shot the schit out of them until they got busted... That would be a ton of fun while it lasted though...

They made the wife mad. Evidently geese were falling into the house and knocking wedding pictures off the wall. From what I here it flat worked.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 13472
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Byers Farm Migration

Postby Indaswamp » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:50 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: for realz?!?! If so -DAMN that is funny!!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 58155
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

PreviousNext

Return to The Honey Hole

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot] and 27 guests