Opus Dei

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Opus Dei

Postby Slack Tide » Sat Oct 19, 2013 5:46 am

I heard about it years ago but then last night on a rerun of the Sopranos...there was a scene were there was a wake. The dead mob guy had a rosary around his hands with a seal on it...like a medallion..
The son of the dead guy flipped out when he saw it and started yelling to the other mob guy about "your wife's Jersey, fundamentalist, Opus Dei BS" because I guess she put the seal on the Rosary....

Who knows more about Opus Dei beyond my quick Google search? Is it some kind of Catholicism quackery?
Here's the clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WYjweQHzCA
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Re: Opus Dei

Postby D Comeaux » Sat Oct 19, 2013 1:39 pm

Opus Dei, formally known as The Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei (Latin: Praelatura Sanctae Crucis et Operis Dei), is an institution of the Roman Catholic Church that teaches that everyone is called to holiness and that ordinary life is a path to sanctity.[2][3] The majority of its membership are lay people, with secular priests under the governance of a prelate (bishop) elected by specific members and appointed by the Pope.[4] Opus Dei is Latin for Work of God; hence the organization is often referred to by members and supporters as the Work.[5][6]

Founded in Spain in 1928 by the Catholic priest St. Josemaría Escrivá, Opus Dei was given final Catholic Church approval in 1950 by Pope Pius XII.[7] In 1982, by decision of Pope John Paul II, the Catholic Church made it into a personal prelature—that is, the jurisdiction of its own bishop covers the persons in Opus Dei wherever they are, rather than geographical dioceses.[7]

As of 2010, members of the Prelature numbered 90,260. Lay persons, men and women, numbered 88,245, while there were 2,015 priests.[1] These figures do not include the diocesan priest members of Opus Dei's Priestly Society of the Holy Cross, estimated to number 2000 in the year 2005.[8] Members are in more than 90 countries. About 70% of Opus Dei members live in their private homes, leading traditional Catholic family lives with secular careers,[9][10] while the other 30% are celibate, of whom the majority live in Opus Dei centres. Opus Dei organizes training in Catholic spirituality applied to daily life. Aside from personal charity and social work, Opus Dei members are involved in running universities, university residences, schools, publishing houses, and technical and agricultural training centers.

Opus Dei has been described as the most controversial force within the Catholic Church.[8] According to several journalists who researched Opus Dei separately, many criticisms against Opus Dei are based on fabrications by opponents,[8][11][12][13][14] and Opus Dei is considered a sign of contradiction.[13][15] Several popes and other Catholic leaders have endorsed what they see as its innovative teaching on the sanctifying value of work, and its fidelity to Catholic beliefs.[16][17] In 2002, Pope John Paul II canonized Escrivá, and called him "the saint of ordinary life."[18]

Criticism of Opus Dei has centered on allegations of secretiveness,[19] controversial recruiting methods, strict rules governing members, elitism and misogyny, and support of or participation in authoritarian or right-wing governments, especially the Francoist Government of Spain until 1978.[20] The mortification of the flesh practiced by some of its members is also criticized. Within the Catholic Church, Opus Dei is also criticized for allegedly seeking independence and more influence.[21]

In recent years, Opus Dei has received international attention due to the novel The Da Vinci Code and its film version of 2006, both of which many prominent Christians and non-believers protested as misleading, inaccurate and anti-Catholic.[22][23][24][25]
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Re: Opus Dei

Postby Slack Tide » Sat Oct 19, 2013 2:05 pm

Yeah I got all that but I was curious to the reason it was such an issue on the Sopranos...like it was herrasy...
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Re: Opus Dei

Postby D Comeaux » Sat Oct 19, 2013 7:35 pm

Found and cut this from an episode recap of that episode.

"Rat Pack" is the fifty-fourth episode of the HBO original series The Sopranos and is the second of the show's fifth season. It was written by Matthew Weiner, directed by Alan Taylor and originally aired on March 14, 2004

As Tony, Bobby and Uncle Junior reminisce at the latter's home, word comes from New York City that Carmine Lupertazzi has died. Uncle Junior is distraught over so many of his friends dying. The next day, during the funeral service, conflict arises between Little Carmine and Johnny Sack. Little Carmine seems to take offense at Johnny and his men telling jokes and laughing at his father's wake and at the fact that more New York mobsters are coming to greet John, who they regard as the successor to the New York throne, than to him to express their condolences for his father's death. Little Carmine later argues with John over rosary beads placed in Carmine Senior's coffin. Little Carmine asserts that Ginny Sack placed Opus Dei beads in the coffin without his knowledge. Little Carmine regards Opus Dei as a "fundamentalist cult" and gives Johnny Sack heated words about it. Despite bonding with Johnny Sack while his father was dying, Little Carmine announces that he didn't mean the kind words he once said to him, including that John was "like a son" to Carmine. Tony and other bystanders overhear. Later, in a restroom at the Bada Bing!, Johnny confesses to Tony he is astounded Little Carmine is now contesting his position as the new boss after having been away from Lupertazzi family matters for years in Florida.
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Re: Opus Dei

Postby vincentpa » Sun Oct 20, 2013 7:03 am

I have a friend that is Opus Dei from Spain. They are super conservative Catholics. I'm sure most of the rumors are just that, rumors. What do liberals in do when they disagree with someone? They try to demonize them. D you think liberal Catholics are any different? Liberals are bottom dwellers no matter who they are. Their actions speak for themselves. Opus Dei are good hard working people that generally have lots of children, go to church and live the religion.
In a free society, it is not the obligation of the citizen to prove to the government that he is a good person. It is the obligation of the government to prove to the rest of the citizenry that the citizen is a bad person, with probable cause.
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Re: Opus Dei

Postby gogetthedogs » Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:27 pm

The Freemasons of the Catholic Church!

Sorry, I should have said.... those against the Freemasons of the Church!
I don't have a catchy phrase to put here!
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