Finally The Waterfowl season Dates

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Finally The Waterfowl season Dates

Postby honkerdowner » Fri Aug 29, 2008 2:50 pm

2008 SEASONS
Ducks:
Low Plains Early: Oct. 11 - Dec. 21 & Dec. 27-28
Pintail - Low Plains Early: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18
Canvasback - Low Plains Early: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18

Low Plains Late: Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 25 - Jan. 4, 2009
Pintail - Low Plains Late: Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 25 - Nov. 30
Canvasback - Low Plains Late: Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 25 - Nov. 30

High Plains: Oct. 11 - Jan. 14, 2009
Pintail - High Plains: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18
Canvasback - High Plains: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18

The daily bag limit will be established by the conventional system. Daily Bag Limit: 6 ducks - Conventional System. May include no more than 5 mallards (of which no more than 2 can be hens), 2 redheads, 2 wood ducks, 1 pintail (during the pintail season), 1 canvasback (during the canvasback season), 1 scaup (combined lesser and greater), and 1 mottled duck. Possession Limit is twice the daily bag.

Merganser Bag / Possession Limits: Mergansers - 5 daily, which may include no more than 2 hooded mergansers. Mergansers do not count toward the conventional system for daily and possession bag limits. Possession limit is two legal daily bags.




Waterfowl Identification

Dark Geese:
East Unit: Oct. 25 - Jan. 28, 2009
North Central Unit: Oct. 11 - Jan. 23, 2009
Platte River Unit: Oct. 25 - Feb. 6, 2009
Panhandle Unit: Nov. 8 - Feb. 6, 2009
Niobrara Unit: Oct. 25 - Feb. 6, 2009

The daily bag limit for all units 3 geese and possession limit is twice the daily bag.

White-Fronted Geese: Oct. 11 - Dec. 21
The daily bag limit 2 geese and the possession limit is twice the daily bag.

Light Geese - Regular Season: Oct. 11 - Jan. 11 and Jan. 26 - Feb. 6
The daily bag limit is 20 geese; there is no limit on possession.

Light Geese - Conservation Action: Feb. 7 - April 12 for 3 zones. See text below for zone restrictions.
There is no daily bag limit; there is no limit on possession.
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SHOOTING HOURS

30 minutes before sunrise to sunset.

Teal Seasons
2008 SEASONS
Ducks:
Low Plains Early: Oct. 11 - Dec. 21 & Dec. 27-28
Pintail - Low Plains Early: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18
Canvasback - Low Plains Early: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18

Low Plains Late: Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 25 - Jan. 4, 2009
Pintail - Low Plains Late: Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 25 - Nov. 30
Canvasback - Low Plains Late: Oct. 18-19 and Oct. 25 - Nov. 30

High Plains: Oct. 11 - Jan. 14, 2009
Pintail - High Plains: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18
Canvasback - High Plains: Oct. 11 - Nov. 18

The daily bag limit will be established by the conventional system. Daily Bag Limit: 6 ducks - Conventional System. May include no more than 5 mallards (of which no more than 2 can be hens), 2 redheads, 2 wood ducks, 1 pintail (during the pintail season), 1 canvasback (during the canvasback season), 1 scaup (combined lesser and greater), and 1 mottled duck. Possession Limit is twice the daily bag.

Merganser Bag / Possession Limits: Mergansers - 5 daily, which may include no more than 2 hooded mergansers. Mergansers do not count toward the conventional system for daily and possession bag limits. Possession limit is two legal daily bags.

EARLY CANADA GOOSE SEASON

Waterfowl Identification
When: September 6-14, 2008

Where: That portion of the state south and west of a line beginning from the Iowa border west along U.S. Hwy. 30 to U.S. Hwy. 81, south to NE Hwy. 64, east to NE Hwy. 15, south to NE Hwy. 41, east to NE Hwy. 50, north to NE Hwy. 2, east to the Iowa border, except federal or state refuges unless otherwise authorized.

What Species: Canada Geese only.

Daily Bag & Possession Limit: Five birds daily; 10 in possession.

Shooting Hours: 30 minutes before sunrise to sunset.

BACKGROUND: Similar to other states and provinces, Canada goose populations have increased in Nebraska in the past two decades. While this effort has resulted in substantially increasing hunting opportunities for Canada geese, it also has generated nuisance problems in some areas, most notably in the metropolitan areas of Lincoln and Omaha. Additionally, increases in Canada goose populations in these metropolitan areas may lead to serious concerns with human health and safety given proximity to local airports.

Although a crisis situation has not been reached in terms of dealing with nuisance problems or populations, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission (NGPC) Wildlife Division staff does not foresee a decrease in the number of Canada geese or in the number of complaints. Indeed, staff expects both to increase in the relatively near future. These expectations are based on continued urban expansion of both cities leading to an increase in urban habitat for geese which concurrently decreases hunting opportunity, ultimately resulting in more conflicts as the frequency of interactions between Canada geese and humans occur.

September seasons were initiated to assist in reducing resident Canada goose populations. The proposed area for this season would include the Lincoln and Omaha metropolitan areas and surrounding area. There has been, and continues to be, a history of nuisance Canada goose problems in this area.

YOUTH WATERFOWL SEASON - September 27-28, 2008

Hunters must be 15 years old or younger. Resident youth hunters do not need any state or federal permits or stamps but ages 12-15 are required to carry a Hunter Education certification card while hunting. Nonresident youths are required to have a Nonresident Youth Hunting Permit and Nebraska Habitat Stamp. The season is open for ducks, mergansers, geese and coots. The bag limit is the same as during the regular season. Youth who are 12 through 15 years must be accompanied by a person at least 18 years old. This adult need not be licensed to hunt. Youth younger than 12 must be accompanied by a person at least 19 years old who possesses a valid Nebraska Hunting Permit. The accompanying adult may not hunt waterfowl. Bag and possession limits are the same as the regular season.
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ADAPTIVE HARVEST MANAGEMENT

Adaptive Harvest Management (AHM) is the tool for selecting duck hunting regulations used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the flyways and states. Key components of AHM are agreement on goals of mallard harvest management, a limited number of regulatory alternatives, and alternative models of population dynamics. The alternative models reflect disagreement among managers regarding effects of hunting regulations on harvest and population size. With AHM, the setting of hunting regulations involves a repeating process: 1) each year, an optimal regulation is identified based on mallard population size and habitat status, and on the relative ability of alternative models to mimic population dynamics; 2) after the regulatory decision is made, each population model is used to predict mallard breeding population size the following year; 3) when monitoring data become available, models that more accurately predict observed population size gain credibility, while those models that are poor predictors lose credibility; 4) the new assessments of model credibility are used to start another repeat of the process. AHM has reduced some of the contentiousness with setting duck regulations and focused discussions on learning and improving our understanding of mallard population dynamics. AHM has already increased our understanding of how hunting affects mallard populations and has lead to some stability in annual hunting regulations. Major challenges to AHM in the near future are incorporating or accommodating other duck species into the process, understanding and deciding how the North American Waterfowl Management Plan goals should be used or not used in the AHM process and if hunter satisfaction should take a role in determining which regulatory alternative is selected by the AHM process.
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LIGHT GOOSE CONSERVATION ACTION



Waterfowl Identification

Season Dates: Feb. 7 - Apr. 12, 2009
Shooting Hours: 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset.

Zone Restrictions: see below



White and blue-phase snow geese and Ross' geese may be taken statewide during the Conservation Action, but different regulations apply in each zone.

Zones 1 and Zone 2: The taking of light geese will be allowed four days a week (Saturday, Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday) Beginning March 24th, hunting will be allowed 7 days per week. It will be illegal to take light geese: on federal or state sanctuaries and refuges, unless authorized; and on the following lands owned or managed by the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Zone 1 Closed Areas: Massie WPA, Hultine WPA, Springer WPA, Wilkins WPA, Pintail WMA, Verona WPA, Bluebill WMA, Eckhardt WPA, Nelson WPA, Kirkpatrick Basin North WMA, Swan Creek WMA. Closed within 1/2 mile of the Platte River outermost channel from U.S. Hwy. 281 to NE Hwy. 14.


Zone 2 Closed Areas: Funk WPA, Prairie Dog WPA, Bluestem WPA, Lindau WPA, and Clark WPA. It is illegal to hunt light geese within 0.5 miles of the outer channel of the north and south sides of the Platte River. By federal regulation, the no-hunt zone expands to 5 miles between March 11 and April 16 to provide protection for endangered whooping cranes.


Zone 3: The taking of light geese will be allowed seven days a week throughout Zone 3 except on federal or state sanctuaries and refuges unless otherwise authorized. By federal regulation, it is illegal to take light geese within 5 miles of the outside channel of the Platte River between U.S. 283 and U.S. 281 between March 11 and April 16.
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WATERFOWL METHODS OF TAKING

Only shotguns 10 gauge or smaller may be used for game birds.
During the Conservation Action, participants may use shotguns capable of holding more than three shells in the chamber and magazine combined. The use of electronic calls is permitted for the Conservation Action. Rifles and crossbows may NOT be used for hunting migratory birds.


WATERFOWL BLINDS

All blinds must be removed daily from Nebraska Game and Parks Commission wildlife management areas except at the following reservoirs: Calamus, Elwood, Enders (refuge portion only) Lewis and Clark, McConaughy, Medicine Creek, Merritt, Red Willow, Sherman and Swanson. At these lakes, temporary blinds may be built but they must be removed at the end of the waterfowl season. Use of these blinds is on a first-come, first-served basis, except for Lewis and Clark. A special permit is required and different regulations apply for blinds on Lewis and Clark. Contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (402)667-7873, ext. 3245 or 3247 for details.
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Butt, Belly, Bill, BOOM!!!
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honkerdowner
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Postby TEAM WEBFOOTPOSSE » Fri Aug 29, 2008 10:07 pm

finally :biggrin:
waterfowler20 wrote:
getemducks wrote:I am new to this but I think what you have there is a duck. :huh:

Are you crazy! That ain't no duck, thats one of'dem cackler gooses! :hi:
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TEAM WEBFOOTPOSSE
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Location: Nebraska


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