Pen raised released mallards

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Pen raised released mallards

Postby Monroeduck » Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:03 am

I didn't want to hijack the thread about NCWA bands so I thought I would make a new thread.

Being that we have a lot of new to the sport folks on here I would be interested in having a civil debate about the releasing of pen raised mallards. Do you support it or not and why?

I do not think it is a good idea. I don't think enough is known about the long term risks involved with the release of pen raised mallards breeding with the migratory population. I personally don't think pen raised mallards act like wild birds and I don't want all mallards to act as dumb as the pen raised mallards I have killed.


Interested in the other side of the debate. Please keep it civil.

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Postby duckaholic2285 » Thu Nov 02, 2006 12:45 pm

I dont like it. Birds in the wild should always be birds in the wild. I like to know that what I have scouted, shoot, killed and cleaned, came from the wild , these pen raised birds are feed by hand, I've shot some pen raised birds down in hyde county and I felt like I was hunting somebodys pet. They dont have the same natural instincts of wild birds, and I feel that the interbreeding will only make wild birds weaker, disease prone, and take the fun out of shooting a wild creature.
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Postby duckaholic2285 » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:18 pm

I dont think that releasing pen raised birds will ever get as bad as the deer hunting in fenced facilities. But they kind of do cross the same lines of how much control should we have with raising birds and then relasing them. This video is about high fence hunting for deer,and some of the information is shocking

http://real-hunters.com/full.swf
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Postby bandedmallards » Thu Nov 02, 2006 3:24 pm

Im undecided on this i do know one thing i cant tell no difference in that taste of a realeased bird vs. a wild one plus you got to figure most of them are killed every year in a general area of where they are released but long as they keep letting them go ill keep killing them
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Postby Monroeduck » Thu Nov 02, 2006 5:41 pm

bandedmallards wrote:Im undecided on this i do know one thing i cant tell no difference in that taste of a realeased bird vs. a wild one plus you got to figure most of them are killed every year in a general area of where they are released but long as they keep letting them go ill keep killing them


I agree taste is the same and I don't pass up a shot on one.

However are there any negative long term impacts to the wild population? If there are then it isn't a good idea. There are many other things that can be done, its just they are not as quick to put birds at the end of a gun.
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Postby KAhunter » Thu Nov 02, 2006 7:35 pm

i think they help and pose no problem... i mean if anything they bring more birds into the area to make better hunting and its not like we are releasing some abnomral strain of mallard into thre system... they are pure mallards just pen raised... the dumb ones usually get shot throughout the season and the ones who make it usually tie in with wild mallards and migrate and become similar (as in they act like wild ducks the longer they are wild) if not the same... for example we raise about 250 each year in currituck, and they usually stick around a pond behind our hunting lodge (we dont hunt them) some get eaten, some leave and some hang around all year... well we had a guy call us from north east ohio who shot one of our birds.. he saw our band and called it.. so some are obviously migrating and tying into the populations.. i think they are not harming and are beneficial to help guides with better bags for their clients and allow for better hunting in general
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Postby gvegas88 » Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:01 pm

As far as I'm concerned, if they help/aid the population then they can release all they want. I don't think i've ever had released mallard decoy but dumb birds are a small price to pay for a lasting population and more knowledge about migratory patterns.
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Postby Wilsona018 » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:50 am

....
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Postby gwp3va » Fri Nov 03, 2006 9:10 am

duckaholic2285,

That video is incredible! It really makes you stop and think. Sure gives you a different opinion of ol' Jimmy, doesn't it?
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Postby KAhunter » Fri Nov 03, 2006 10:03 am

wilson,
first it is veyr expensive and hard to raise canvasback or pintail or many other speices as there are very few breeders and these speices simply dont respond well to caged environments... second there is no proof or reason to believe that there birds pose a threat to other waterfowl but means of diseae transmission... these birds are well fed and monitored for any sign of disease and should be harmless if they come in contact with any wild birds... i just think it puts more birds in the area and its not creating a non wild race of mallards, like i said the dumb ones get shot the others tie in with wild birds and migrate or even breed locally... i think it cant hurt anything if it is continued
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Its always duck season, there is just a long break from february to september.
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Postby bpcaptain » Fri Nov 03, 2006 10:28 am

I have never read any real research that states a harmful effect of pen raised birds. I still don't think that is the answer. I still believe our efforts in the off season in conjunction with an organization such as D.U. and Delta Waterfowl have the best ideas. If we take what land we have left and improve it for the habitat the more wild free range birds we will have. All it takes is for us to get in the field without our guns in the off season and help. I realize the pen birds give us more to shoot at but is that what this is all about. People go to such measures to shoot a tame bird off of someones dock instead of scouting and putting in the time it requires to be a successful Duck hHunter??? Those organizations do alot in more for our area than most people realize. Look at the Roanoke and Coastal plain Projects. I really don't see a cure all and realize there are more ways to help, I just think they are headed in the right direction.

Again just my .02

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Postby NCSUGolfer » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:07 pm

Sure raising mallards in a pen seems like the easiest answer to predation of nesting success but your messing with mother nature and the food chain. There has to be some other ways to increase nesting success and there are but the boys from the SCWA have to have something to shoot each year. J/K. Hell, my roomate from state owns and operates Buchanan Shoals on the Pee Dee and he raises 3,000 birds a year. Sooner or later they'll end up bringing in a disease and cause a major prob.

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Pen raised birds

Postby IrishEyes » Fri Nov 03, 2006 3:01 pm

In NY I worked on a shooting preserve,dog handler,Didn't get paid but it was too much fun working the dogs.
They raised over 5,000 mallards from 1 day old. These birds were never penned but raised on a lake and fed generously. Each mallard had one ehind toe cut off when it was just days old.The lake was hand dug during the depression and was shaped like a long U.
The birds were fed on a beach that had a large trap door built on it, when it was time to hunt the trap was dropped, catching hundreds of birds inside the fenced in area.
The birds were gently herded into one corner with a small hole in the fence. Long boxes were aligned from this door, each box had a drop door at both ends and both were pulled out ,creating a long tube for the trappped birds to run into. When the birds were all in the tube the trap doors were dropped and birds taken out of the top door on each box. Thes birds were examened for the missing tow and if they were one of ours they went into a transport box. All other ducks were thrown away to fly away. Other birds learned to mooch of our free grain and some hung around all year.
The birds in the transport boxes were taken away to be released. The would fly right back to the lake and this time there were hunters in blinds all around the lake. Every 50 released birds ,or so, the game keeper would blow a horn and all shooting would stop. The hunters would relocate to a new blind and then the hunt capt. blew a horn and another 50 birds were thrown.
After the last shoot of the season the feeding stopped and the mallards just went away.The bird breeder was very careful to keep his stock wild. He had clipped wing females and the breeders flew in from where-ever. Why bother to feed males when he could get the job done for free?
Sorry for the long letter but if you ever shoot a "wild" mallard with a small hind toe missing thank a shooting preserve.
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Postby KAhunter » Fri Nov 03, 2006 7:06 pm

they clip the hind toe on all released birds in ncwa or wherever not just from preserves.... and i dont think this is seen as the answer or seen as the end to the problem of lower duck numbers ijust think it is an easy and effective way to bring a few more birds into the area... it doesnt take place of scouting and "real" hunting i mean most people never see one or dont see many, not enough to make it go from bad hunting to amazing hunting... it just is a way to put a few more birds out there... we stills hould work on habitat managemnet and preservation and i for one still scout and work to find my the birds even if i know there are ncwa relased birds out there... its juts not hurting anything and can only help with some people shooting a few more birds when they go out.. and im not saying its all about how much u kill but it sure as hell makes it a little more fun
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Postby Wilsona018 » Wed Nov 08, 2006 5:14 pm

.....
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Postby qwerty » Sun Nov 12, 2006 3:37 pm

I think that any time you are introducing farm raised animals into a wild population, consideration for disease transmission has to be taken into consideration. The poultry industry goes to great length to keep their animals disease free because they know the mass production of the fowl is a wonderful environment for disease to thrive. The Avian Flu that swept through Asia came in part from wild and captive birds interacting. To my knowledge there is no uniform standard for the releases of these birds into migratory populations, and I feel there should be.
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Postby NCSUDucker » Sun Nov 12, 2006 3:45 pm

I agree with the previous two posts and there is no quick fix to waterfowl populations. While I won't pass on shooting a tamie there is no way in mind to justify releasing "wild" mallards just to try and shoot a few extra birds. There have been very few of these birds ever being reported that are shot anywhere very far from their release site. Just because so-and-so shot one over in OH or AR doesn't make it a good practice.

As for the avian flu, there was a wildlife tech checking birds when we came out saturday. She swabbed all of our birds and took the heads.

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Re: Pen raised released mallards

Postby COOP3 » Fri May 24, 2013 9:44 am

We are releasing mallards for the first time on our farm this year. What got me interested was my neighbor did it last year and he invited me to shoot with them a couple of times. I would guestimate that a solid 75% of the birds we killed out there were wild birds with both due claws (released birds had clipped toes). I also think this had a lot to do with the fact that he released a small number (200) and by the end of summer, about half were left. Later when late November rolled around, he had well over 300 birds that we counted on what we call the "holding pond" and thats when I realized how many wild birds it attracted. I don't have any personal problems with it as far as hurting the wild population. These are the same species ducks and you're only creating a small population that will stay around your place over years which in my opinion is a plus. I also think the disease argument is invalid because, after breeding poultry for so long, I've realized that the wild birds are usually the ones who are more immune to diseases so if anything, the released birds are prone to get sick and die but its unlikely the wild birds will catch a disease. Just my thoughts on it. We're releasing 150 in a couple months at 5-6 weeks old and giving them plenty of time to become "wild" and also we'll be banding 33% of them to see where they end up.

Good luck! Hope some of yall northerners get a band from Willis Pond Farms! :grooving:
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Re: Pen raised released mallards

Postby Dingbatter 2 » Fri May 24, 2013 12:11 pm

I thought about getting a propagation permit (required by law) and purchasing a few dozen. I have an old chicken coop out back. Raise 'em up and lop their heads off. They may even taste better than wild birds and there is no reason to waste a good shell on them. Besides the potential for disease issues, their lack of migrating like wild birds and possibly interbreeding with our resident black ducks, and the fact that hunting is getting to be like everything else...instant gratification, no skill required, highly competitive (numbers), not a sport or a tradition, kill as many as you can afford, sure, why not?

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Re: Pen raised released mallards

Postby wahoowilly » Sat May 25, 2013 6:15 am

For it. Love to shoot 'em...as long as I don't have to buy 'em. And if I can't shoot 'em, where I hunt, I can run 'em down with the car.
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