roost vs loafing pond

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roost vs loafing pond

Postby loondog » Mon Dec 10, 2012 12:30 pm

Hi all,

I'm new to the forum and pretty new to duck hunting.

I know there are opinions on both sides of a lot of ethical questions. I tend to take a fairly conservative approach but there are some issues I am not very well educated on yet.

I saw a recent post and discussion on someone shooting ducks off a roost. What is considered a duck roost and what would be the difference between a roost and loafing pond? I assume that when I set up in an area where ducks want to get to that I am on a loafing pond? Understanding that shooting birds on their roost could push them out of an area I would prefer to avoid it but need to understand it better? Thanks for the insights in advance.
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby utahgolf » Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:00 pm

for ducks, I say on public land do what ya gotta do. Birds will technically roost everywhere, freeze holes I hunt, the birds roost on and we kick them out in the morning they come back in all day. If I owned property or was goose hunting, I'd try and leave the roost alone and hunt where they're feeding.
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby JuniorPre 360 » Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:05 pm

loondog wrote:Hi all,

I'm new to the forum and pretty new to duck hunting.

I know there are opinions on both sides of a lot of ethical questions. I tend to take a fairly conservative approach but there are some issues I am not very well educated on yet.

I saw a recent post and discussion on someone shooting ducks off a roost. What is considered a duck roost and what would be the difference between a roost and loafing pond? I assume that when I set up in an area where ducks want to get to that I am on a loafing pond? Understanding that shooting birds on their roost could push them out of an area I would prefer to avoid it but need to understand it better? Thanks for the insights in advance.

From my experience, the roosts I have found are small out of the way ponds. A lot of the times, they are surrounded by trees. A "loafing pond" I picture as semi big water. In these roosts I have found, ducks will fly in right before sun down and it's a place where they eat and sleep. I read a comment earlier about someone hunting a goose roost. They said they were going to hunt it before someone else does. That's a good point. I had an amazing wood duck roost this year that held around 30. There were feathers and broken twigs all over in the water. I'd go there to shoot mallards and the woodies would always stick around. Two weeks later, I went back and found empty shells everywhere and not a single wood duck in sight. I have yet to see a duck come back into that area. But I've seen the kids that hunt it every day. If this spot is well hidden, I'd leave it. If not, I'd maybe hunt it before someone else does. Unfortunately, I've come to find that the mentality of a lot of jump shooters is to "kill kill kill." Whatever flies will be shot every day for the rest of the season in the same spot.
A BAD DAY AT THE MARSH BEATS A GOOD DAY AT WORK.
killwoodies101 wrote:your a dudshe bag! You dont own the river your dont own any property around it.. Its just as mush mine and any other tom **** and harry's as it is yours !! get a life share what is yours or stop hunting
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby duckslayer74 » Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:07 pm

utahgolf wrote:for ducks, I say on public land do what ya gotta do. Birds will technically roost everywhere, freeze holes I hunt, the birds roost on and we kick them out in the morning they come back in all day. If I owned property or was goose hunting, I'd try and leave the roost alone and hunt where they're feeding.


X2^^^^^^^^! Public land? You bet I'd shoot. Wouldn't hesitate for a second.
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby duckslayer74 » Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:12 pm

JuniorPre 360 wrote:
loondog wrote:Hi all,

I'm new to the forum and pretty new to duck hunting.

I know there are opinions on both sides of a lot of ethical questions. I tend to take a fairly conservative approach but there are some issues I am not very well educated on yet.

I saw a recent post and discussion on someone shooting ducks off a roost. What is considered a duck roost and what would be the difference between a roost and loafing pond? I assume that when I set up in an area where ducks want to get to that I am on a loafing pond? Understanding that shooting birds on their roost could push them out of an area I would prefer to avoid it but need to understand it better? Thanks for the insights in advance.

From my experience, the roosts I have found are small out of the way ponds. A lot of the times, they are surrounded by trees. A "loafing pond" I picture as semi big water. In these roosts I have found, ducks will fly in right before sun down and it's a place where they eat and sleep. I read a comment earlier about someone hunting a goose roost. They said they were going to hunt it before someone else does. That's a good point. I had an amazing wood duck roost this year that held around 30. There were feathers and broken twigs all over in the water. I'd go there to shoot mallards and the woodies would always stick around. Two weeks later, I went back and found empty shells everywhere and not a single wood duck in sight. I have yet to see a duck come back into that area. But I've seen the kids that hunt it every day. If this spot is well hidden, I'd leave it. If not, I'd maybe hunt it before someone else does. Unfortunately, I've come to find that the mentality of a lot of jump shooters is to "kill kill kill." Whatever flies will be shot every day for the rest of the season in the same spot.



I wouldn't knock jump shooters, it's a different way of hunting. I put lots of miles on my boots to jump shoot late season.
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby JuniorPre 360 » Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:24 pm

duckslayer74 wrote:
JuniorPre 360 wrote:
loondog wrote:Hi all,

I'm new to the forum and pretty new to duck hunting.

I know there are opinions on both sides of a lot of ethical questions. I tend to take a fairly conservative approach but there are some issues I am not very well educated on yet.

I saw a recent post and discussion on someone shooting ducks off a roost. What is considered a duck roost and what would be the difference between a roost and loafing pond? I assume that when I set up in an area where ducks want to get to that I am on a loafing pond? Understanding that shooting birds on their roost could push them out of an area I would prefer to avoid it but need to understand it better? Thanks for the insights in advance.

From my experience, the roosts I have found are small out of the way ponds. A lot of the times, they are surrounded by trees. A "loafing pond" I picture as semi big water. In these roosts I have found, ducks will fly in right before sun down and it's a place where they eat and sleep. I read a comment earlier about someone hunting a goose roost. They said they were going to hunt it before someone else does. That's a good point. I had an amazing wood duck roost this year that held around 30. There were feathers and broken twigs all over in the water. I'd go there to shoot mallards and the woodies would always stick around. Two weeks later, I went back and found empty shells everywhere and not a single wood duck in sight. I have yet to see a duck come back into that area. But I've seen the kids that hunt it every day. If this spot is well hidden, I'd leave it. If not, I'd maybe hunt it before someone else does. Unfortunately, I've come to find that the mentality of a lot of jump shooters is to "kill kill kill." Whatever flies will be shot every day for the rest of the season in the same spot.



I wouldn't knock jump shooters, it's a different way of hunting. I put lots of miles on my boots to jump shoot late season.

Not knocking on jump shooters necessarily. Just the mostly high school kids that go through the fields in a truck, jump out, and blast everything. Then the very next day, it happens again until there is absolutely nothing left for the rest of the year. But their buddies keep on trying. I jump shoot as well. But like you, I'll walk far all through places like OB or BRBR and jump shoot streams and ponds. Maybe I should substitute jump shooters to drive bys. This is what drives the ducks out in my area. I am trying to find a single woodie for a youth hunter on this site so he can put it on the wall. But it's almost impossible now that there are trucks full of kids with shotguns all over. In October, it would have been a 5 minute walk. My area might be a little more unique due to high hunting traffic.
A BAD DAY AT THE MARSH BEATS A GOOD DAY AT WORK.
killwoodies101 wrote:your a dudshe bag! You dont own the river your dont own any property around it.. Its just as mush mine and any other tom **** and harry's as it is yours !! get a life share what is yours or stop hunting
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby duckslayer74 » Mon Dec 10, 2012 4:33 pm

Gotcha JR, :thumbsup: I've seen good spots I've had for years got to crap because of that.
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby Factor 8 » Mon Dec 10, 2012 7:10 pm

loondog wrote:I saw a recent post and discussion on someone shooting ducks off a roost. What is considered a duck roost and what would be the difference between a roost and loafing pond? I assume that when I set up in an area where ducks want to get to that I am on a loafing pond? Understanding that shooting birds on their roost could push them out of an area I would prefer to avoid it but need to understand it better? Thanks for the insights in advance.


When done properly a roosting area can be hunted effectively without pushing birds out of the area. I have a few spots I've hunted for many years that way. Hunted them pretty much up to the close of the season. I see a roosting area no different then a feeding area. You hunt it hard with no rest and the birds will wise up to it. However you hunt it soft(once a week) you will have a good thing going. Some areas that have high density of food can be hunted with more pressure. Some folks are under the belief that hunting a roost is a no-no. I'm not that way. To much pressure and it's ruined. But if it's light, it's a sweet thing!!!
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Re: roost vs loafing pond

Postby loondog » Mon Dec 10, 2012 10:37 pm

Factor 8 wrote:
loondog wrote:I saw a recent post and discussion on someone shooting ducks off a roost. What is considered a duck roost and what would be the difference between a roost and loafing pond? I assume that when I set up in an area where ducks want to get to that I am on a loafing pond? Understanding that shooting birds on their roost could push them out of an area I would prefer to avoid it but need to understand it better? Thanks for the insights in advance.


When done properly a roosting area can be hunted effectively without pushing birds out of the area. I have a few spots I've hunted for many years that way. Hunted them pretty much up to the close of the season. I see a roosting area no different then a feeding area. You hunt it hard with no rest and the birds will wise up to it. However you hunt it soft(once a week) you will have a good thing going. Some areas that have high density of food can be hunted with more pressure. Some folks are under the belief that hunting a roost is a no-no. I'm not that way. To much pressure and it's ruined. But if it's light, it's a sweet thing!!!


Thanks for insight!
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