questions about impoundments

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questions about impoundments

Postby LJUIV » Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:30 pm

I know it will be difficult to help with this since you can not see the land in which I am refering to but here goes anyways...
I have a piece of property on the edge of the great dismal swamp in VA. The land is pretty low and very fertle...I want to plant about an acre of corn and flood it... I have a backhoe and a water pump. I was hoping someone might beable to give me some general knowlege about doing this before I start. My initial plan was to dig about 2 feet out and build a 3 foot dyke around the area. I suppose I would have to put some of the topsoil back in the area because corn doesnt grow so well in clay..
Anyway, is an acre 2 small or can this possibly work (there are plenty of ducks and geese in the area...
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Things to keep in mind

Postby keegan511 » Thu Dec 06, 2007 3:14 pm

-For every foot of vertical growth you should taper your edge of the dike 3 feet out into the water.

-make sure there is a release point if you happen to get a rain event and would like some water control. You can do this with flash board risers

-consider planting something other then corn that will allow for natural regeneration of the plant. Millets, smartweeds definitly are top quality duck foods.

-if you can or would like I have some adobe files that I can email you talking about basic moist-soil management of wetlands. This is what you are trying to simulate if I am reading your poist correctly.

hope this helps.
Take a man duck hunting and he will eat for a day; Teach a man how to duck hunt, HIS WIFE WILL HATE YOU.
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Postby KAhunter » Thu Dec 06, 2007 6:30 pm

yeah corn does work well but doing a moist soil regime can result in a higher yield with more food and its better for the ducks... generally the ducks will suck in on a moist soil flooded impoundment pretty well, especially when the birds are in feed mode and are looking for that good natural vegetation...
"If you have to be crazy to be a duck hunter, i dont wish to be sane" Robert Ruark

Its always duck season, there is just a long break from february to september.
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