Future Flooded Corn Field

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Future Flooded Corn Field

Postby FeatherBlaster » Thu Feb 07, 2008 12:09 am

I need advice on planting a corn field (or some other kind of food that ducks like) that will flood in late november.
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Postby Wismer » Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:55 am

Hey man I am a farmer in Ontario, Canada

what are you looking for in terms of advice?

Will you harvest the corn or just leave it for the ducks? Believe it or not this all has an effect on how you manage it.

Basically you prepare the ground, fertilize (if you want a higher yield), harvest, rotate the crops the next year... If your field is not going to get harvested then you would probably be safe with corn every year but if you are looking for a yield and some profit then you rotate your crops every year usually in a corn, beans, wheat, repeat... if you grow the same crop every year diseases and pests hide in the soil and will attack the next years crop. Like I said if you are just giving up the crop for ducks then it wont matter if some of the plants die.
Take 'er easy

Craig
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Postby FeatherBlaster » Sat Feb 09, 2008 1:37 am

the whole reason is for hunting ducks... I suppose that the geese will come into it too. This isn't meant to be harvested, although I am not against that idea. it would be less than 1 acre of corn when all said and done. What do you think?
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FeatherBlaster
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Postby rmh » Sat Feb 09, 2008 5:34 am

With no traditional harvesting planned you need to check baiting restrictions, that might be a gray area.
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Postby Wismer » Sat Feb 09, 2008 7:32 am

If you are not looking to harvest it, then you wouldnt need to fertilize (unles your soil is terrible) and you wont need to rotate the crop every year. So focus on ground prep and seeding

do you have an atv or a tractor?
Take 'er easy

Craig
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Postby FeatherBlaster » Sat Feb 09, 2008 6:01 pm

I do have a tractor at my disposal, however I don't know what attachments I might need other than a tiller, What do you think?

As far as the "baiting," the field is normally planted with grasses and sometimes wheat so I don't think it could be considered planting 1 acre of corn in a 30 acre field "baiting", besides it is on private land and I am in the middle of the willamette Valley which is basically a 100 mile long 30 mile wide food plot for ducks and geese. The field would only get hunted on the weekends, and the rest of the week I could consider it a refuge for the week and weary birds.

Thanks RMH for your concern in regards to possible conflict with the regulations of my state I do appreciate it. The above thoughts are just my own I will be checking it out.

Nathan
Listen more than you speak.
FeatherBlaster
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Postby rmh » Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:10 pm

You're welcome. I read it again and it looked like I was trying to pee in your coffee when I wasn't, just have seen/know how things can turn to crap if the wrong rabbit cop turns into your driveway.
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1 1991 Chevy Lumina (harvested by a PT Cruiser)
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baiting

Postby goosekiller32 » Sat Feb 09, 2008 9:18 pm

shouldnt have to worry bout baiting. long as your not out there throwing corn piles in the field next to a honey hole. if its a planted crop that just got missed come harvest time. oops. people leave corn rows in there fields all the time for wildlife. while it attracts them for hunting purposes, its exactly like you said, a refugee for weak and hungry animals. get into a bad winter where im from and it can kill off a good percentage of wildlife. them few corn rows left in a field here or there gives hungry animals a good place find food and a little cover from high winds also. i think its a great idea, you can have a little weekend enjoyment without sticking to much time or money into it and when your not hunting it, your helping the wildlife stay alive
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Postby Wismer » Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:40 pm

what size is the tractor? (HP?)

A small 3 point hitch disk (5-8 feet wide depending on how big your tractor is) should be just the ticket. You may have to go over the field more than once and/or put some weight on the disk for maximum production... but that should be your best bet.

A tiller will create a nice seed-bed but it will be overkill for corn... and it is slow as heck. The nice thing about the disk is the faster you go the better it works. Assuming the tiller and the disk were the same width you'll go ten times as fast with the disk and do ten times as much

What did you have in mind for planting the corn?
Take 'er easy

Craig
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Postby FeatherBlaster » Sun Feb 10, 2008 3:37 pm

This is my in-laws property and tractor, I don't know what size it is, although it is relatively small, maybe 30 - 50 hp.

They don't farm the field, they lease that field out. this area that floods is not seeded, either because it still has water in it come planting season or it is too muddy.

I am more or less looking for when I need to plant the corn and maybe when is it to late to plant. also do I need irrigation for the corn? if so I might be screwed, as most of the farming is dry. That being said I am not set on corn, I just thought that corn was the cats meow of feed for waterfowl. Any other suggestions are more than welcome.

It is a sweet setup. There is a Timbered slew that floods when the dam upstream in the mountains is opened up. it will flood out 100 yards past the timber line. I get to set up on the edge of the timber.

Nathan
Listen more than you speak.
FeatherBlaster
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Postby rmh » Sun Feb 10, 2008 5:17 pm

What are the geese/ducks eating in the fields now? Corn does need a fair amount of water at the right time. Farmers in MD found that out this past year, it was tragic. Millet might bring them in, but from what it sounded like you may be growing that already. Does this field flood naturally or do you plan on helping it along? That creates another set of problems. I wasn't able to mentally picture the setup from your description. You mentioned a slough that floods, does that come up to this field?
2013 Totals
1 2003 Ford Focus (harvested by a 6 point whitetail)
1 1991 Chevy Lumina (harvested by a PT Cruiser)
rmh
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Joined: Tue Dec 25, 2007 3:50 pm
Location: On the Chesapeake

Postby FeatherBlaster » Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:36 pm

This particular slough has all kinds of trees through out it. And it ends at the field where when if floods it goes out into the field. it is all standing water, no current to speak of. the slough fills as excess snow melt in the cascades fills the dams they open the dams a bit to release the water and the rivers in the valley fill up a bit, and this raises the water level in the slough. Technically the property is in a "flood plane."

Nathan
Listen more than you speak.
FeatherBlaster
hunter
 
Posts: 26
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 2:27 pm
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon

Postby rmh » Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:44 pm

Sounds like you have a decent set up. The trick will be to get the ducks out of the slough and into the flooded field, or make them want to be there. Also don't want to educate them. It may be the slough is a roosting area.
2013 Totals
1 2003 Ford Focus (harvested by a 6 point whitetail)
1 1991 Chevy Lumina (harvested by a PT Cruiser)
rmh
hunter
 
Posts: 1693
Joined: Tue Dec 25, 2007 3:50 pm
Location: On the Chesapeake

Postby FeatherBlaster » Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:52 pm

this season, the field finally flooded in the begining of January. So I only had a couple weekends to hunt it. Each morning I hunted, ducks were dropping right in on the decoys at first light, with nothing planted in the pond. The action was only for about 1 hour, then it tapered off. I am hoping to have more action if the area that floods has something planted in it.

Nathan
Listen more than you speak.
FeatherBlaster
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Posts: 26
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2006 2:27 pm
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon

Postby Wismer » Mon Feb 18, 2008 4:50 pm

Yes corn as a cash crop needs water to flourish, but if you are only using it to feed the ducks then it doesnt really matter if it is dry, as long as its not bone dry. If it is dry the plans will be short, ears of corn small and so will the kernels but if its just duck food they dont care how high quality the crop is.
Take 'er easy

Craig
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