Planting for flooded ponds?

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Planting for flooded ponds?

Postby mystic99 » Mon Feb 25, 2008 11:29 pm

Is there anything that can be planted in lands that dont dry out. I was tossing around the idea of tryin to plant a pond to make a duck pond out of. Right now it has tons of trees and fallen brush in one end and the other is mostly open. Had plenty of woodies comming into it this year but that was about it. Its mostly only a foot or two deep at the worst. Also we dont get enough rain around here to drain it and fill it back up in time for duck season. Any ideas on what could be possibly sowed in???
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Postby Swanyriver » Tue Feb 26, 2008 7:37 am

I have located a few stores on the internet that have forage for waterfowl. I plan on looking into a plant called wild celery that will plant here in texas and live through the summers here and also tolerate the frost/freeze. I will see if I can locate and post some links.
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Postby KAhunter » Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:33 am

plant sago pondweed... it grows very easily and is easy to spread across your whole pond... you simply throw out the weighted tubers... you can also try different kinds of burreed, bulrushes, sedges and grasses, along with arrow arum... these all grow in standin water and ducks love them... if i was in your position i would plant sago... ducks love it, i have hunted some shallow ponds with it in it that have been loaded up with teal, widgeon, pintail, ringnecks, gadwall and swan and the only thing in there was sago pongweed.. both divers and puddle ducks will utilize it.. look into Wildlife Nurseries Inc for more information...
"If you have to be crazy to be a duck hunter, i dont wish to be sane" Robert Ruark

Its always duck season, there is just a long break from february to september.
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Postby MacMan » Tue Mar 11, 2008 1:02 pm

Guys, don't know if you are still researching this; I was as well and found this site. You have to be able to control the water however - in other words, drain - plant - flood. . .

http://www.wildlifeseeds.com/foodplots/ ... .html#DUCK
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Postby KAhunter » Tue Mar 11, 2008 5:07 pm

in my experience i wouldnt waiste your money on those mixes.. just go buy some jap millet an some buckwheat... dont mix them just plant 2 different plots... they must be dry for the growing season then can be flooded... that will do just as well and will grow better.. if anyne needs any more info just pm me
"If you have to be crazy to be a duck hunter, i dont wish to be sane" Robert Ruark

Its always duck season, there is just a long break from february to september.
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Postby IndyWingmaster » Sun Mar 16, 2008 5:21 pm

Mystic99 if you have an area that stays wet most of the year if not the whole year than consider planting native plants from the region in which you live. Find a native plants nursery. What to look for is a nursery that sells their seed in PLS oz. This is pure live seed ounces, meaning that if you wanted for example 80 oz. of seed, and their germination tests show that only 80% of seed tested germinates, then they will give you 100 oz. of seed so that you are given at least 80 oz. of PLS. The benefit of using natives are that they grow well and they are perennials, low to no maintenance. You can put in a diversity of plants that attract waterfowl. Consult a local biologist for their suggestions. I would suggest plants, but off hand I am only familiar with the midwest as far as what to plant. Good luck.
So we probably should have brought our guns.
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