whip program ?

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whip program ?

Postby allquackedup71 » Sat Mar 22, 2008 7:53 pm

I'm new to this site, love what I see!! Does anyone have any info or experience using this government program called, I think, the"whip" program? It's a program that helps you pay for seed to plant for wildlife.
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Postby olddkguide » Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:57 am

Contact your local federal ag office they should be able to help.
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Re: whip program ?

Postby allquackedup71 » Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:34 pm

allquackedup71 wrote:I'm new to this site, love what I see!! Does anyone have any info or experience using this government program called, I think, the"whip" program? It's a program that helps you pay for seed to plant for wildlife.
I'm just seeking some details, if anyone knows, about what it involves, and how to qualify. Thank you. Which government agency?
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Postby greenster » Mon Mar 24, 2008 8:27 pm

The Arkansas Game and Fish offers a similar program, as I think most state agencies do. "Acres for wildlife".

Landowners and tenants must meet each of the qualifications listed below to enroll:

1. Plots must be at least one acre in size. An entire farm or any part of a farm can be enrolled.
2. Eligible lands – Nearly all farmlands, rangelands, and woodlands are eligible.
3. Ineligible lands – Cities, towns, parks, and recreation areas or public wildlife management areas.
4. Landowners and other participants must agree that land will be maintained AND/OR management practices will be
continued for at least one year on land enrolled. Each year, landowners must re-enroll to stay in the program.

Landowners and tenants are also encouraged to actively manage their land for wildlife using such techniques as the following:

1. Prevent destruction of existing cover.
2. Improve existing cover by timber management; adding food or cover plants; adding structures such as brush piles, artificial dens for squirrels, nest boxes for wood ducks or other birds; prescribed burns; strip disking; strip mowing; fencing livestock out of timber and or streams.
3. To create new wildlife habitat, Cooperators might:
a. Protect areas to allow native plants to grow and conduct proper management in the future.
b. Plant desirable trees, shrubs, or herbaceous plants.
c. Develop water control structures and planting for waterfowl.
d. Create clearings in extensive wooded areas and plant or manage native vegetation for wildlife.

Benefits of the program:

* Signs are offered to place around gates and entry roads to identify the area is being managed for wildlife.
* Free seed packet(s) provided by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.
* Free wildlife technical assistance available from a Private Lands Biologist.
* Cooperating landowners or tenants can receive a certificate of recognition.
* There is no cost to landowners to enroll or to receive any of the benefits of the program.

Cooperators may receive packet(s) of lespedeza seed and/or an annual wildlife seed mix if requested. Enrollment forms must be received by February 1st of each year to receive that spring’s planting materials. Both types of seed packets are primarily selected to provide food and/or cover for bobwhite quail, but many other species of wildlife will benefit also. The number of seed packets provided will depend upon the number of acres enrolled each year and number of landowners requesting this seed. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission provides these planting materials.

The main purpose of the seed packet component of the program is to provide seed to plant a wildlife food plot and for landowners to follow up on their own to plant additional food plots as needed for specific wildlife objectives. A limited supply of seed packets is provided to help landowners see the benefits wildlife food plots can provide and for them to then plant additional plots as needed to provide food over portions of all their lands.

Landowners receiving seed packets must have a tractor and planting equipment or have access to these in order to receive the planting materials. Scattering seed from these packets on top the ground provides little or no benefit to wildlife. The food plot(s) should be disked, fertilized and limed according to soil tests, with PROPER GROUND PREPARATION to result in optimum benefits to wildlife.






It Should be ver simular: heres a link to there website: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/whip/
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Postby allquackedup71 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:29 am

Thank you very much. That's exactly the kind of info I was looking for.
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