What should I plant in my flooded out field?

A forum dedicated to conservation issues and listings of conservation Orgs

Moderators: NV Guide, Dogman

What should I plant in my flooded out field?

Postby Cashman » Tue Jul 15, 2008 2:31 pm

Ok, so this spring we got a ton of rain as everyone knows. I'm a farmer and have a field with a couple ditches running though it. It got flooded out. Well, after two times re-planting the field, it flooded again. So now I got around 40 acres of bare dirt that may or may not be flooded again before this fall. I do however have the control to flood it if I want to (because of the ditches). It's too late to plant my field corn for a profit, so I thought I would put in something that would bring in some ducks or other animals this fall. In a couple of days, it should be dry enough to plant. I got all the equipment to make something grow, but I'm not sure what to put in for seed. There's about ~60 days before the first frost will come. Any ideas?
Some things are like wiping before pooping, they just don't make any sense.
User avatar
Cashman
hunter
 
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 8:08 pm
Location: Southern Wisconsin


Postby olddkguide » Tue Jul 15, 2008 2:58 pm

You are cutting it close, but should have time for grain sorghum (milo).
The limiting factor for you is going to be cool nights. Milo loves hot weather. Your soil temp should be just fine right now. You can harvest and still have a good wildlife food source. Check it out with the ag extension folks in your state and see what they think. Cool nights might reduce your overall production. You know your weather in your area. If it drops below 55 very often at night before September you might want to do some checking. I do know milo is dependent more on temp than number of days to maturity.
olddkguide
hunter
 
Posts: 668
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:50 am
Location: Georgia

Postby DuckSlyer16 » Tue Jul 15, 2008 7:52 pm

Out of the blue, who did you get your seed from? and are you organic?

I would try millet, it takes like 45 days to head out, so get the first cut in early, then second one cut it whenever you want birds to come,
User avatar
DuckSlyer16
hunter
 
Posts: 1189
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:16 pm
Location: Over there

Postby David » Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:25 am

Japanese millet is fine in moist soil. It matures in 45-60 days and can then be flooded. DO NOT CUT IT. Do not cut any grain outside of normal harvesting methods and then hunt for ducks. It is against federal law.
ImageImageImage
User avatar
David
Lefty
 
Posts: 3715
Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: Mobile, AL

Postby REDLEG » Wed Jul 16, 2008 11:46 am

if you dont get it planted in the next few days, just wait a month and drill in winter wheat or rye. geese will use it and if it floods ducks like the stuff to when its young.
REDLEG
hunter
 
Posts: 84
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 9:16 pm
Location: monroe county,AL

Postby olddkguide » Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:59 pm

The last two ideas are both real good options.
olddkguide
hunter
 
Posts: 668
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:50 am
Location: Georgia

Postby DuckSlyer16 » Wed Jul 16, 2008 1:38 pm

David wrote: DO NOT CUT IT. Do not cut any grain outside of normal harvesting methods and then hunt for ducks. It is against federal law.




oops, sorry that actually completly forgot about that (face palm) :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: wow I even read that about a week ago, wow


but you could cut it early and bail it and use it as bedding??

and can you flood millet?
User avatar
DuckSlyer16
hunter
 
Posts: 1189
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:16 pm
Location: Over there

Postby David » Wed Jul 16, 2008 1:58 pm

DuckSlyer16 wrote:but you could cut it early and bail it and use it as bedding??

and can you flood millet?


As long as you are following normal agricultural practices when bailing, but is bailing millet normal? Bailing it would remove the seeds that are the reason that the ducks are coming in in the first place. Best to just leave it be.

You can flood any crop and hunt over it as long as you do not manipulate the crop outside of standard practices.

Here is a link from the federal regulations. Your state can make the laws more strict, but not less, so this is the minimum standard. Following is a quote from the regulations.

http://www.fws.gov/le/pdffiles/09-30-04 ... ochure.pdf

Waterfowl Hunting on Agricultural Lands
Agricultural lands offer prime waterfowl hunting opportunities. You can hunt waterfowl in fields of unharvested standing crops. You can also hunt over standing crops that have been flooded. You can flood fields after crops are harvested and use these areas for waterfowl hunting.

The presence of seed or grain in an agricultural area rules out waterfowl hunting unless the seed or grain is scattered solely as the result of a normal agricultural planting, normal agricultural harvesting, normal agricultural post-harvest manipulation, or normal soil stabilization practice.

These activities must be conducted in accordance with recommendations of the State Extension Specialists of the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (Cooperative Extension Service).
ImageImageImage
User avatar
David
Lefty
 
Posts: 3715
Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: Mobile, AL

Postby DuckSlyer16 » Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:50 pm

David wrote:
DuckSlyer16 wrote:but you could cut it early and bail it and use it as bedding??

and can you flood millet?


As long as you are following normal agricultural practices when bailing, but is bailing millet normal? Bailing it would remove the seeds that are the reason that the ducks are coming in in the first place. Best to just leave it be.

You can flood any crop and hunt over it as long as you do not manipulate the crop outside of standard practice


Would ducks come to flooded millet?
User avatar
DuckSlyer16
hunter
 
Posts: 1189
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:16 pm
Location: Over there

Postby David » Wed Jul 16, 2008 7:22 pm

DuckSlyer16 wrote:Would ducks come to flooded millet?


I would say that Jap millet is one of the most planted seeds for attracting ducks and not harvesting. Ducks love flooded millet.
ImageImageImage
User avatar
David
Lefty
 
Posts: 3715
Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: Mobile, AL

Postby Cashman » Wed Jul 16, 2008 8:01 pm

[quote="DuckSlyer16"]Out of the blue, who did you get your seed from? and are you organic?

I get most of my seed from the DeLong Company (Pionere brand). And no, I'm not organic whatsoever
Some things are like wiping before pooping, they just don't make any sense.
User avatar
Cashman
hunter
 
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 8:08 pm
Location: Southern Wisconsin

Postby DuckSlyer16 » Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:19 pm

alright thanks, My dad does a lot of work ( seed salesmen) down , well everywhere in the mid-west and I just wanted to know if you got anyfrom him.., but he sells mostly organic,
User avatar
DuckSlyer16
hunter
 
Posts: 1189
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:16 pm
Location: Over there


Return to Conservation/Biology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests