what tempature for wild upland?

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what tempature for wild upland?

Postby jehler » Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:44 am

Is it safe to cook wild hare, grouse or pheasant to medium instead of well done?
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Postby OneShot » Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:34 pm

Buddy, if you're cooking it past medium rare, you're killing it.
It'll be safe. Try it at medium and see how much better it tastes, then go to medium rare and you'll have joined that exclusive club of sportsmen who know how to properly cook their game.
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Postby jehler » Tue Mar 11, 2008 2:39 pm

One shot, I have never cooked duck past medium unless I am doing a low braize, like you would a veal shank and have never understood how guys can stomach overcooked duck. I have only recently begun hunting upland again and was impressed with the flavors but not the dryness. Thanks for the input, I look forward to next season so I can get foody on the critters. I am a decent cook and assumed it was safe but just wasn't sure.
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Postby OneShot » Tue Mar 11, 2008 2:42 pm

I gotcha Jehler.
You'll do just fine if you go into it the same way you do the ducks.
Good luck next year.
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Postby duckjumper » Tue Mar 11, 2008 3:56 pm

I'd have to disagree. Hare, which is a red meat, is indeed better medium - you want some pink. However, hares (jackrabbits) are often so tough they really need to be cooked long, low and slow.

As for grouse and pheasant, (and for rabbits, incidentally) I would not go much below medium. Rare can be a little iffy with white meat, although you very much want a blush of pink...

Dealing with dryness can be done by poaching (not boiling) in either stock or oil. Confit is the best way to deal with lean white meat such as pheasant or rabbit legs.

Anyway, that's my $0.02.
I love all of God's creatures, properly prepared.
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Postby jehler » Tue Mar 11, 2008 5:22 pm

Duckjumper, by confit do you mean "poaching or braising" in rendered fat? Like classic duck confit? If so this something I have never done but would try, if you have a link or website that explains the method I would be grateful. I cooked rabbit last week by searing then braising in a reduction of white wine and chicken stock with coarsely chopped onion garlic and fresh thyme with Dijon mustard and a dollop of sour cream. I strained the reserved liquid for a sauce after cooking covered at 225 ish in a convection oven for about two hours, it was good but a little drier than I wanted. Is this just the nature of a March hare? Or could I improve my recipe/method, the flavor was great the texture was good. Just seemed like it could be better. I would love some recipes for grouse, if you have any to share, and what I am gathering from both of you is to cook grouse or pheasant to the same tempature as I would a pork tenderloin
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Postby Canned Heat » Wed Mar 12, 2008 7:49 pm

duckjumper wrote:I'd have to disagree. Hare, which is a red meat, is indeed better medium - you want some pink. However, hares (jackrabbits) are often so tough they really need to be cooked long, low and slow.

As for grouse and pheasant, (and for rabbits, incidentally) I would not go much below medium. Rare can be a little iffy with white meat, although you very much want a blush of pink...

Dealing with dryness can be done by poaching (not boiling) in either stock or oil. Confit is the best way to deal with lean white meat such as pheasant or rabbit legs.

Anyway, that's my $0.02.



Up here in WI...seems like sauces and stews get the nod. Goose gets bacon on it, rabbit and certain upland birds..even wild turkey, often get slow cooker preparation due to the way they dry out if cooked too hot too quick. I found that if you slowly roast or grill any game that's really lean, you'll get the best results. Other than venny or elk steaks. I slap those on a HOT grill and in no time flat it's to the plate.
I've actually soaked turkey legs in a brine and made them a day later...big difference.
Reality is a great place....I just wouldn't want to live there.
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Postby duckjumper » Wed Mar 12, 2008 10:04 pm

jehler,

Yep, just like a pork tenderloin: Done through with a blush of pink - you can do the same with rabbit, too.

THE best description of confit is in Paula Wolfert's "Cooking of Southwest France," which is about a region that eats a ton of ducks and geese.

For a confit, you mix salt and thyme 50-50 and coat the rabbit (or whatever). Let it sit in the fridge overnight.

Get a heavy deep pot and fill it 2/3 full with olive oil or lard or duck fat.

Take your critter, wash off the salt/thyme and pat dry. Submerge in fat and place in a 200 degree oven that is NOT preheated.

Let it cook for a minimum of 4 hours, up to 8 hours, until it is falling off the bone. Take it out of the oven and let cool on the stove.

Once it is cool but before the fat has solidified (if it's lard or duck fat), take out the meat. You can now either vacuum seal it or serve it by searing it off quickly and serving at once.

Also fantastic shredded...

I have more recipes like this on my blog, whose URL is below. Let me know how it goes if you try this - it is one of my favorites.
I love all of God's creatures, properly prepared.
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