What to do about bruising?

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What to do about bruising?

Postby uscg4good » Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:28 pm

New duck hunter here. I was just wondering what you guys do about the bruised parts of the meat from the shot? Is it safe to eat? If you cut out those parts usually end up losing a lot of meat.....
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Postby brassass » Mon Dec 01, 2008 1:20 pm

i normally remove the clots or whatever is hung on the meat, i dont know if you would consider that the bruising or not, if not then i don't remove the bruised parts
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Postby GroundSwatter » Mon Dec 01, 2008 1:47 pm

I wash/ rinse them in the sink really good, remove all the blood clots, etc, like brassass said.

Just get the blood and stuff out of it, if its shot up too bad, I might throw it away or cut out the shot up part.

rinsing them really well in running water also helps get pellets and feathers out of the meat too.
It's a fact that 70 percent of the people who purchase heavier tackle do so with the categorical I just lost a huge snook! Einstein Hairdo.The other 30 percent have either Tarpon Fever or are sporting a hand cramped into a claw from a deepwater grouper.
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Postby uscg4good » Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:00 pm

I guess they're called blood clots then. And it's unsafe to cook them with the clots? Just seems like sometimes it goes all the way through the meat, and I wasn't sure if I was doing the right thing by cutting it out and felt like I was wasting a lot of meat.
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Postby GroundSwatter » Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:28 pm

You can try and cook it with the clots in, but you will get a mouth full of blood when you bite into it. You can usually rinse them out really well if you just massage the meat under running water.
It's a fact that 70 percent of the people who purchase heavier tackle do so with the categorical I just lost a huge snook! Einstein Hairdo.The other 30 percent have either Tarpon Fever or are sporting a hand cramped into a claw from a deepwater grouper.
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Postby uscg4good » Mon Dec 01, 2008 3:25 pm

Good stuff. Thanks guys.
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Postby mallard molester » Mon Dec 01, 2008 5:18 pm

New duck hunter here. I was just wondering what you guys do about the bruised parts of the meat from the shot? Is it safe to eat? If you cut out those parts usually end up losing a lot of meat.....


I've had that same problem.
I think the other members that responding are thinking of blood clots that are created in wound channels and outside the breast.
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make

Postby paduckkiller » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:52 am

Make jerky out of it. When I run into a shot up breast and can't wash the blood out of the meat, I throw it in a bag and mark it jerky. When its jerky you can't taste the blood, because you dry it out so much. Another thing I do is instead of cutting the bruised part out, I run my finger through the shot canal and work it back and forth, this gets most of the blood out.
Line em up and watch em fall.
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Postby Pumpgunner » Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:35 pm

If you brine them in salt water for a day or two the blood will draw out, works for me at least. The brine water will be red in a day or so from all the blood drawn out.
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Postby mallard molester » Wed Dec 31, 2008 4:03 pm

I tried that once but then my duck tasted overly salty :thumbsdown:
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I

Postby paduckkiller » Wed Dec 31, 2008 4:49 pm

After you brine it, before you freeze it, wash it off under cold water.
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Postby pete/pmr » Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:01 pm

When I clean the birds I put them in a bowl of luke warm water to help clean the pin feathers and blood off the meat,once all birds are cleaned and soaked,I put them in the sink in a plastic tubb and run warm water on them until the water in the tub remains clean of blood,picking out the breasts and cleaning them of tissue and stuff you want off them!Massaging the breastmeat that is clotty,helps remove the blood and using the spline of a butter knife dragging across the meat also works well to squeeze it out ,you could try cutting the meat into strips also and then soaking it!Also use less salt in the brine,but desolve the salt in warm water first then mix more water in then put the breasts to soak!
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Re: What to do about bruising?

Postby lbhntr » Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:01 pm

let it soak in ice water with vinegar and salt ....put alot of ice in water pour a good bit of vinegar and a little salt that usually draws the clots out and takes away the gamey taste
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Re: What to do about bruising?

Postby Duck Whisperer » Mon Jun 22, 2009 11:41 am

Sorry for this long post - I got to wrambling, but I did at least put my tip first.

Another good tip: I use one of those cheap chopsticks - the wood ones that come joined such that you have to pull them apart, leaving squared off ends. I've found that a lot of shot holes appear closed up and difficult to determine if they are even a through shot. Use the pointy end of a chopstick on every shot hole to "figure out" the shot path. Pushing the first inch or two of the chopstick back and forth (under water or running water through the hole as you ream) usually opens up and cleans out a hole. And for especially bloody/bruised holes, push the chopstick all the way through until the larger, squared off end is within the shot hole (under water) then "twirl" the square end - the squared off aspect does a good job. By opening up all the shot holes with a chopstick, before soaking in saltwater, helps better ensure more blood is soaked out.

I've found almost nothing helps with a severely bruised breast - say one from a bird that fell a fair distance then hit hard on water or land. I've lightlly scored the breast to help during soaking, but sometimes they are just too bruised - I don't even want them used in my processed meat. (I'm not a big jerky fan, so I can't attest to how it may affect that, But I'd be inclined to think dried blood is still blood).

I don't like ANY blood in waterfowl as that's what gives it that livery taste. After 35 years of ducking, I've come to discover that even a bird that appears to have no shot in it, may have bruises and/or pockets of blood Iin between muscle groups). So I am pretty meticulous about cleaning.

Now for a biology tidbit(s): It's blood, and specifically the iron in blood, that gives it that livery taste . Think about it, liver is the blood cleansing organ; it's full of blood, and it tastes like.....liver. Do you know what the difference is between the "white" meat and the "dark" meat on a chicken/turkey? The more a muscle is used, the more blood is needed to supply that muscle with oxygen during use. Domestic fowl don't really fly (much at least); they do constatlly get around by walking. The legs/thighs are darker because they have more blood vessels in them verses the white meat. Now ducks, they fly hundeds of miles in a clip, their breasts are chock full of blood vessels.

I shoot, eat myself, and give away a lot of birds each season. I'll pick every bird I can to put in the freezer whole, but as soon as I run across even one pellot hole in a breast or leg area, I'll breast that bird out. I soak all my cleaned birds (whole or breasts) in a heavy saltwater, changing water several times over a day or two. Never, in 35 years, have I had birds taste salty because of it (though this did happen to me once with rabbits, and I'll never figure out why). I'll package up whole birds and "unhit "breasts, but any breasts with shot holes go in a bag marked butcher (to eventually be made into sausage, brats, etc.) and on those, I tend to cut away many shotholes anyway. I shoot enough that I can be pretty picky making sure the whole ducks and "eating" breasts I put in the freezer are prime; I'd hate to give someone some meat only to have it bloody or bruised. No wonder some people don't like ducks - if they get birds that aren't prepped correct to begin with.

Oh, and I take the breast meat that is going to be processed, and cut it into smaller strips and soak that in saltwater (over and over) to get rid of as much blood as possible. You'd be surprised how much more blood comes out. Ive had processed meat made using my analy prepped way verses a "friend" who just quickly breasts, rinses, then freezes his breasts...... then straight to the butcher. You wouldn't believe the difference.
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Re: What to do about bruising?

Postby ctbduck » Wed Jun 24, 2009 7:41 pm

Its not unsafe to eat the clots, it just wont taste as good. I realize you can get out the blood with a salt based brine, but it could ruin the flavor as well. Maybe try a brine with chicken stock, or if your up to it make your own duck stock. If you arent sure how to do this i would be glad to help. Keep you duck in a brine like that for a few hours and it should help get some of the clot out as well as give the duck more flavor and cover up some of that "gamey" taste. I have a few recipes for brines i use for turkey that would work just as well for duck.
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Re: What to do about bruising?

Postby aggiechiro » Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:49 pm

just 2 quick things

1. i find that really tore up breasts make good chili meat, especially if you throw some venision in the mix. personally i like to debone the legs and wings too to help fill the chili meat bag.

2. while dark meat does have more muscle, and that does mean an increased demand for blood, it is the mitochondria in the meat that determines darkness. mitochondria make most of a cell's energy. in short bursts energy is just made in the cell, but burning fat or long term aerobic use of carbs recquires the mitochondrial matrix. the more something is used the more it need, hence why long distance migrators need more in their breast than a chicken. the taste does still come from the metals in it.
-not important but i felt like correcting it. info based on what i learned getting my B.S. mollecular and cell biology, B.S. human biology, and by the end of the 10-11season will have Dr. before my name. i doubt you would but if anyone wants references let me know.
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Re: What to do about bruising?

Postby slimm21 » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:57 am

I clean my breast out under water in the sink with a pair of scissors.

I make sure to cut any clots off, and poke thru any holes (shot will drive feathers into the meat) to clean out feathers. If you've ever cooked up duck and got a feather, you know why this is important!

I make sure to get any membrane of the breast as well. The key is to just take your time and clean them through and through with a scissor or knife with water or whatever.
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Re: What to do about bruising?

Postby Duck Whisperer » Thu Jun 25, 2009 11:09 am

aggiechiro,

If ya got something that can be cut and pasted, or a quick website, I'll take the references. First time I've heard about amount of mitochondria influencing muscle color. Don't worry if it's something you'd have to copy and type from a reference book. PM me if you want so you don't boor any others. Been 25 years or so since I was in college. Took a lot of ...ologies, but I can't really remember if i took micro? That's bad. I do remember covering mitochondrial chemistry in my biochem class....ohhh, the horror!!!
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