Pro-Drive?

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Pro-Drive?

Postby pointimgdogs » Sun Oct 30, 2005 10:29 am

I am considering a new boat in the spring. One of which is a pro-drive . Has anyone used these boats in shallow rocky rivers ? I would not run up anything greater than a class 2 rapids. I have done this many times in my 16 by 48 jon boat but have beaten the dog cr** out of the skeg and prop of my 25hp outboard. I don't know if I like the floors in the pro-drive boats. A lot of trip hazards? Maybe a 16 by 48 center console prodrive boat: is the 32 Vangard a good choice , or maybe on the lighter side a 25 Koahler ? BIg Red hangs out in Louisiana whith them ol'boys quite a bit and he says pro-drive is the ticket to the thicket. Thanks Pointing Dogs
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Postby UT Greenhead » Sun Oct 30, 2005 10:56 am

I own/run a 18X52 ProDrive rig with a 32hp PD on the back. I'd say the PD will suit your needs well, but you will need the rock guard installed which adds more weight. The PD rock guard isn't like most other rock guards. It's got 4 other "skegs" built on the regular one. They had one in da back of da truck at Reelfoot a few months ago and I thought I got a pic of it, but can't find it now. I'll holla at a few friends to see if they got one of it.

As far as the "tripping hazards", I thought the same thing when I saw there boat, but for some reason, I don't even realize they're there when I'm in my rig. That's hard to explain, but its da truth.

Weight might be an issue with a 32hp on a 16ft boat. I would suggest at least a 17ft but think 18 is optimum. As far as width.......that's more difficult to suggest. 54 was too wide for me, but 48 was too narrow. It mainly depends on what type of load you plan on carrying. I usually always have 3 people and two dogs with me, so I wanted a little wider boat. If you won't have much load in your rig, the 48 would be fine.

I'll try to find that pic of the PD rock guard. I promise its one bad dude!

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Postby HaydenHunter » Sun Oct 30, 2005 5:32 pm

I've not run a Pro Drive boat but I have owned and run GatorTrax boats which have the same tubing running latitudinally as bracing. I would agree with UTG that strange as it sounds, it really is not a tripping hazard. You know it's there and just deal with it. I consider it a far greater benefit to have an open hull that I can walk up and down at will, versus having to step over a center bench / seat.

As far as short tails and rocks, it's a go. The prop on the Pro Drive you asked about is hardened and will whack an amazing amount of hard objects without curling up and dying like your aluminum prop.
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Postby Evil_McNasty » Mon Oct 31, 2005 10:04 am

Gator Trax makes Pro Drive boats. And don't worry about tripping on the braces. You are much more likely to trip over deeks, dogs, and gear than the boat's parts.
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tunnel hull

Postby pointimgdogs » Mon Oct 31, 2005 12:05 pm

I see on the Gator Trax web site a tunnel option ? Anyone know anything about this feature?
Thanks
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Postby Evil_McNasty » Mon Oct 31, 2005 12:12 pm

Neat feature, it allows the boat run really shallow since the prop spins up inside the rooster tail instead of at the water's actual surface. Good for sandy flats type water.

If you want to use the boat in a real ducky area you might have problems though. The tunnel loves to catch on stumps and such when working through a stump field. Could make sharp turns impossible. Kind of takes away some of the benefit of having a flat bottom boat in the 1st place.
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Postby HaydenHunter » Mon Oct 31, 2005 3:15 pm

Tunnels are good for running over very shallow HARD surfaces such as sand, gravel or rock. They will not help you with mud. If are running with prop trimmed up you cut hard turns with a tunnel boat and a shorttail you may push the prop outside of the water plume. Tunnels make the boat squat a bit more in the water and they will cost you a MPH or two in the speed dept. But when you are running over hard shallow surfaces they can be a nice asset.

You will have to ask yourself whether this applies to you. I ran a tunnel last year on a GT and would not order another with tunnel for where I run 95% of the time...I don't need it. Yet I have a bud in WA State who hunts 100 miles West in the Potholes Reservoir over shallow sandy conditions. He has a boat that is the twin to the one I ran last year and he would never consider owning a boat WITHOUT a tunnel!
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