Lofting

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Lofting

Postby duckmann » Sat Jan 27, 2007 11:43 am

I received my plans ofr my MMB Sculler the other day and it appears that they did not include full size or even 1/2 size plans for the forms. Instead I only have a table of offsets . . . anyone know how to loft or knows of a website where this process is explained?

Thanks,

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Postby Wispete » Mon Jan 29, 2007 1:42 pm

Hello, First time poster, The Wooden Boat Forum is very helpful with this kind of information. Also Duck Boat .net. Lofting is easier to do than explain, so beare with me. First you establish a base line. All measurements start from this point. Not seeing your table of offsets, I will infer that they are of either a end view of you boat or a side viewof your boat. This information should be on the print. Offsets are a short hand way of giving a lot of measurements. 1-6-2 an example 1ft. 6in 2sixteeths This would be a measurement up from the baseline. The print should also give you the intervals that these measurments are from each other on the base line. 1ft. 10inchs etc. One ft. is very common. On a sheet of plywood or large piece of paper. Draw a base line. This is you starting point. Take a two ft. square and draw a line verticle to the base line. measure up "example" 1 ft. 6in. 2 sixteenths and mark. and continue with the measurements given for each interval. When done with this you will have a series of marks on the verticles that when connected should form a curve. Next to connect the marks get a peice of wood called a batton. This will vary in size depending on the size of the boat and the sharpness of the curves. You might have several. For the lenght a 3/4" by 3/4" sraight grained piece of wood. For the frames a smaller batton 3/8" by 1/4" If you drew you Pattern on a piece of plywood take finishing nails and put one in at each mark and bend your batton around each nail forming a smooth curve from mark to mark and connect the dots with a pencil. I hope I answered some of your questions. There are books just on lofting but for a smaller boat not necessary. As you study your print things will become clearer and clearer. The people that often make prints make a lot of asumstions that a first or secound time person making a boat would know, but it's not so. Good luck on building your boat. It can be a very worth while and interesting experience. Wispete
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Where did you get your lines?

Postby Andy Grant » Mon Jan 29, 2007 10:15 pm

I heard the Merrymeeting lines from a certain supplier build a great duck boat, but not a real sculler. It is hard to scull, but works good with a motor.
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Postby ShawnT » Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:12 pm

Andy, You've mentioned in a couple of other postings that the MMB Sandy Point plans don't make for a good scull...Do you know of someone who does have a good MMB design for sale? Like Duckmann I just bought the Sandy Point plans and have heard from others that it is a great boat but not very scullable. Building a boat for sculling purposes was my winter project...now I'm not sure if I want to proceed.

Duckmann, I have the full size lofted plans from Sandy Point if you want to take a look at them. I live in Topsham. Send me a PM if you are interested.

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Postby Andy Grant » Thu Feb 01, 2007 11:36 am

Good set on plans? Good question. pm sent
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Postby AK Ray » Fri Feb 02, 2007 9:42 pm

John Gardner's Building Classic Small Craft has a MMB duck float in it with all the plans and plank lining offsets with a good discription on how to loft and use the plans. Plank lining takes true boatbuilding skills built over a life time of work.
Makes me love thickened epoxy all that much more - just spackle the gaps closed and no one will be the wiser.
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Postby Andy Grant » Fri Feb 02, 2007 10:31 pm

AK Ray wrote:John Gardner's Building Classic Small Craft has a MMB duck float in it with all the plans and plank lining offsets with a good discription on how to loft and use the plans. Plank lining takes true boatbuilding skills built over a life time of work.
Makes me love thickened epoxy all that much more - just spackle the gaps closed and no one will be the wiser.


I heard that was a good float. I think you could use the offsets to create molds for a strip built boat. (I am pretty sure somebody with more knowledge than me told me that.) I am getting ready to order the book. I may not build it right away, but it could be fun to build and have a classically constructed float.
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Postby Wispete » Sat Feb 03, 2007 12:37 am

Andy, That book is worthwhile for any kind of boat you want to build. It will get you started on the right foot. I 'm glad Ray brought it up. I checked it out at the local library. Check in your library for books on strip building also. Gardner isn't absolete, just that there are more modern materials
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Postby Andy Grant » Sat Feb 03, 2007 9:51 am

I did go to the library earlier in the week hoping to find it, but with no luck. So I ordered it last night online. I am interested in the sneakbox plans too in it. Now I just need to wait for it to arrive.
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