Kara Hummer boats - for rivers

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Kara Hummer boats - for rivers

Postby geotreb » Sat Oct 27, 2007 12:31 pm

Hey there,

Have many of you used a Kara Hummer boat on river water? The planes seem simple enough, and I like the look of the boat. I'm wondering if anyone has used them much in river situations?

(Gentle flowing rivers, free stone bottoms)

I'm looking to build a boat (well, because I like building stuff) but also to access more water (islands, sloughs, etc) that you ordinarily can't access from foot...

If that doesn't seem like a good choice.. does anyone have suggestions?

I'd like to find plans for a build your own boat that can do a few things...
1. Carry me, my dog and dekes down the river, 300+ lbs (or other potential waters)
2. I'm pretty sure I'm not going to be in push-pole country. I'd rather use a kaykak or canoe paddle.
3. again something that's tough enough to handle river water - nothing crazy... but we're not talking mud bottom, swampy stuff...

any ideas? or am I looking for too much out of a homebuilt boat? I liked the looks of the Kara Hummer, but I wonder if it's the boat for me?
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Postby AK Ray » Mon Oct 29, 2007 2:43 pm

The KARA's don't paddle like a canoe, so if you need a boat that makes sharp turns easily it may not work for you. If you are just drifting and not needing to paddle back up stream then the KARA will be fine. The design is really stable and can be modified somewhat to suite your personal tastes. If you have to baddle up stream the KARA will wear you out since it has a huge wetted surface when compared to canoes, or even the Carstens Puddler.

The epoxy and glass covered hull will be tough enough for "gentle" work in any water. You may have to repait scrapes each summer to keep the UV light from the sun from damaging the epoxy.
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Postby geotreb » Tue Oct 30, 2007 4:39 pm

That sounds fine to me. I am not intending on paddling very far back upstream - mostly I want to down drift to where I want to be...

I'm not super concerned if it doesn't make sharp turns - only that it does respond to the paddle...

I'm thinking of laying in some runners on it too, so it can track a bit better if I build it.. Also thinking of using a composite of plywood and foam for the superstructure members - an attempt to get the weight down some, so that I can tote it to some more remote river accesses.

I am intending on putting on the Missouri here in MT, just at it's headwaters - nothing very crazy, certainly nothing white. The water is definatly moving however... but people float with canoes, jon boats and kayaks on it too.
I like that the kara is stealthy - and that it is stable and capable of handling a pretty good payload.

the only other boat I've been considering building is either the Devlin Mallard
Image
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or the Bateau Honker 15
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or Glen-L's Duck Boat Too
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I like the Kara.. because I think it's the cheapest, potentially easiest to make.... and the stealthiest - or ties with the Devlin Mallard

What do you think of the other boats?[/url]
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Postby AK Ray » Wed Oct 31, 2007 6:15 pm

I built a Devlin Black Brant III some years ago. Great boat. The smaller versions are even better when just one person is hunting.

The Mallard is known for not working well with outboards. It has more hull displacement than the Bluebill. If you are paddling/rowing you might want to go with the Bluebill since it is a planing hull. Neither boat will be fun to drag far.

I don't know much about the other boats.

Some guys have built the CLC Mill Creek kayaks and use them to get to where they want to hunt. Good load, stable for a kayak, but the kits are not cheap and they take a little pit of work to go from plans to cut out parts to the boat. Stitch and glue is easy, but the KARA is even easier with its frame.
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Postby skippy » Wed Oct 31, 2007 7:36 pm

i built a kara hummer in two weekends and it came out awsome. i didnt buy the plans, i just eyeballed pics and dim's from a few websites and had a go at it.total cost minus the blind $300! i modified mine quite a bit , i made it into a square back with a rear planing hull,about 38 inches for the stern,then i modified it for a pop up blind that rolls up with stakes , like a turkey ground blind, and it has the capability to layout also, very versitile. if i were you id mount oar locks on yours. one thing about the hummers, they are heavy mine weighs in at #160, a four rivers is way lighter. another boat that is worth the money is the new FA final aproach brand duck boat, that boat in my opinion is far better than a kara, or four rivers. it is said to handle a little more choppy watter and is rated for a bigger motor.i have a beavertail 6.5 honda, and it moves it along at a good clip .if you have more money than time and dont want to be hastled with fiberglass resin go with 4 rivers or fa brand, if you need pics , let me know
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Postby skippy » Wed Oct 31, 2007 7:43 pm

also i only weigh 150# but my chesapeake is about #110 and with a few dozen deeks it isnt a problem, but my kara has a bigger hull because i extended the rear transom width ,this also makes it far more stable, im not sure if id feel comfortable in a double ended "normal" kara in deep open water, esp if thier is a chance of a rough watter or a storm.
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Carsten Canvasback

Postby Koondog » Thu Nov 01, 2007 5:28 am

Take a look at the Carsten Canvasback. It can be fitted for layout hunting, will handle a 6.5hp motor, can easily navigate choppy waters. It's not quite as low profile (4" taller) as the Karas, 4Rivers, and Marsh Gunner, but you won't get swamped as easily. The boat weighs 150#. I would recommend a trailer for any of these boats. They aren't heavy, but they are long and bulky. Trailering just makes it much easier to handle even if you don't have a boat ramp. Good luck in finding a boat. Layout hunting is the way to go.
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