Goose Question

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Goose Question

Postby BSUTravis » Mon Jan 23, 2006 2:08 pm

I'm gonna order my materials for my first attempt at a Canada Goose. I was looking at the McKenzie catalog, and was gonna go with the artificial head....but was also looking at their artificial necks. The pose I was wanting is kind of a "take off" position with both wings up about to make a swoop down to get the bird airborne. The question I have is if anyone's used their artificial neck materials??? Are they flexible....I'm not totally sure on the position since the goose wouldn't be "flying" or straight necked, and of course it wouldn't be relaxed either....so I will be playing with the position for realism.

Also, can anyone help me with wire gauge sizes for the wings/feet/neck???

I'm assuming that everything for the goose will be the same as a duck??? Any advice is appreciated.

Thanks!

Travis
Noblesville, IN
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Postby Pete-pec » Mon Jan 23, 2006 8:13 pm

Travis,

I've never used the artificial neck for a goose, but I believe they are flexable. I've used the artificial neck for turkeys, and they work great, and are indeed flexable. I believe it states if they are flexable or not. On my geese and ducks, I've always used foam necking material. I believe it is easier to get the correct length and thickness of each perticular bird. I'ts kind of like the artificial heads and bodies. Very seldom do they fit like they should. If you are doing a standing bird you will want a heavy gauge wire for the support on it's base. I would use a 10 or 8 on the legs for a standing mount. For a flying mount, I'd use a 12 for the legs, and 10 or 12 for the wings. I suppose for the neck, I'd use 12 or 13 if you can find it. If I was going to support the full wing completely spread, I'd go with the heavier wire of course. I will tell you a big difference in a duck -VS- a goose, the amount of fat usually on a goose is much heavier. When you flesh the bird use extreme caution when removing fat with the wheel, the skin is very thin, and just under the last bit of fat, and poof! Burn through! One other note, since you have mounted other birds, remember to actually measure the bird body, and try to pre-fit the artificial head, neck, and body before leaping in on a mount only to find that the stuff doesn't fit correctly. I mounted a Pintail today, and had to grind the artificial head down to make it fit, and the form I used was actually intended for a Wigeon, and if I was using an artificial neck, I can guarantee it would have never fit. The neck was as thin as a Bluewing Teal. Thank goodness I have alot of different supplies on hand. If I had placed an order for my Pintail from what the book had suggested, I would have been screwed right in the middle of taxiing that bird. The good thing is I live fifteen minutes away from 2 taxidermy supply companies, but not everyone has that luxery.

-Pete
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Postby BSUTravis » Mon Jan 23, 2006 8:43 pm

Pete-

Thanks much for the response. Yeah, the neck material is indeed flexible....it's the Ferebee flexible neck in the McKenzie catalog. Thanks for the info you gave me. I don't have a wire-wheel so I guess I'll be spending a lot of time with the wire brush eh??? Also, do you recommend using DP or plain borax on your ducks? (I have both) AND, when I flesh my deer I usually use the DP as a soaking agent, can I do the same with the goose/duck or would you not add any until it's totally fleshed???

Thanks!

Travis
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Postby Pete-pec » Mon Jan 23, 2006 9:32 pm

Travis,

I've always used sifted Borax, which I sometimes refer to as dry preservative. Works well for me, never had bugs yet! I wouldn't want to do a bird any other way than with a wheel. Never had to use a brush alone, but I can't see how it could get all the stuff effectively. That's a chore that I wouldn't want to undertake. I don't add any Borax until I've completely fleshed, washed, dried, and was running wires. The Borax is added to the completely inverted skin, then I run the wires.


-Pete
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Postby BSUTravis » Tue Jan 24, 2006 7:33 am

OK....thanks for the advice!
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