Building a tumbler

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Building a tumbler

Postby Duck Nasty » Sat Feb 15, 2014 12:46 am

I was planning on using a old dryer motor to build a tumbler but scared the Rpms will be too high. Is there a way to slow it down or a different motor that I should use
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby beretta24 » Sat Feb 15, 2014 4:59 pm

If you're just starting I would just use a bucket for the sawdust. A little light tossing in the sawdust and then blow the bird feathers dry. You can get a blower for $150, it takes up very little space and you can dry a bird in 10 min or so.
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby duxrus » Sat Feb 15, 2014 8:05 pm

I started out just using a dryer for a tumbler with good results. I unhooked the heating element and fiber glassed the back
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby Duck Nasty » Sun Feb 16, 2014 8:14 am

I have been using a bucket but was planning on building up.

Dux did you have any issues with the dryer tearing any of the birds up? I heard ideal is 15-20 Rpms and dryera usually run around 60


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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby beretta24 » Sun Feb 16, 2014 9:28 am

Duck Nasty wrote:I have been using a bucket but was planning on building up.

Dux did you have any issues with the dryer tearing any of the birds up? I heard ideal is 15-20 Rpms and dryera usually run around 60


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How big of bucket, rpm is relative.
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby duxrus » Sun Feb 16, 2014 11:18 am

I don't remember having any issues but that was LONG ago :lol3:

If you use a lot of corn cob grit it will cushion the skin anyway :thumbsup:

I also only tumble for about 10 minutes. My birds get dried by air compressor and hair dryer BEFORE being tumbled. I use it only as a preening device.
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby Frank Lopez » Wed Feb 17, 2016 4:39 pm

beretta24 wrote:If you're just starting I would just use a bucket for the sawdust. A little light tossing in the sawdust and then blow the bird feathers dry. You can get a blower for $150, it takes up very little space and you can dry a bird in 10 min or so.


Ok, I know this is an old post, but it seemed like a good place to start and ask questions. So far, I'm not a tumbler, though I did take a class in tumbling and gymnastics almost fifty years ago in college. Didn't doo too well there either. Anyway, I've found myself in a bit of a predicament. I have ten or twelve birds to mount for some friends. I've skinned them, fleshed them, degreased them and rinsed them and frozen them in blocks of ice. I have the manikins on hand as well as all the other necessary materials. My problem is drying the birds. Usually, I use a hair dryer, but this process can take an hour or more. I've been threatening to build a tumbler and am gathering information, but right now, I don't have everything available to build it. So, after reading this and other threads here (best source of information I've found, by the way) I figured I'd try some "manual tumbling". I have a couple of five gallon pails and one that's a bit larger, maybe close to ten gallons. The shop is loaded with sawdust, so I figured I'd give that a try.

My question is this. given the materials I have on hand (buckets and sawdust), what's the process? I realize that I should blot and dry the bird as much as possible, then what? Do I drop the bird in the sawdust and start rolling it around? How long does it take?

I'm a little concerned because the birds are for friends. If they were my own, I'd jump right in and experiment, but I really don't have that luxury at this point. I can always just use the compressed air, reversed vacuum and hair dryer, but I'm trying to condense the cycle.

Thanks for any help.

Frank
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby beretta24 » Thu Feb 18, 2016 10:08 am

My suggestion is get a pet dryer, way faster than a normal hair dryer and less heat.

I was taught to press the major water after rinsing by rolling up and squeezing in a towel, toss around in saw dust until it's in all the feathers and skin is covered, and then dry, doing the neck and head last (head and neck don't need to be completely dry at this point). Some may dip in white gas after water because it'll dry faster.

Drying with a pet dryer shouldn't take but about 10 min for a duck, if that.

Merely how I was taught and 1 of 10 million ways to do it.
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby Frank Lopez » Thu Feb 18, 2016 4:04 pm

I finished a standing hoodie today. The thing took two days to thaw out of the ice block! dried it well by squeezing and paper towels, then set it outside for about an hour. then took my shop vac in reverse and blew it out. Didn't seem to be doing much. Wound up using the hair dryer anyway. Still wondering about building a tumbler and what the correct process is.

Frank

By the way, do any of you take the hood on these birds?
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby duxrus » Thu Feb 18, 2016 5:30 pm

Go buy a beat to hell old dryer and unhook the heating element and fiberglass the opening grill in back closed. I used one as a make shift tumbler the first year or so i started. After i decided to do this professionally i bit the bullet and bought a real one. Best money ever spent.
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby Frank Lopez » Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:36 pm

I was trying to avoid the old dryer trick. I just don't have the space for something that large. I was thinking of something more portable, like a five to ten gallon drum with a motor on a set of rollers. I just don't know what the rpms should be. I read somewhere about using a rotisserie motor, but I think that might be a bit small, both in power to turn and not enough RPMs. I have three or for 120vac motors laying around that are from 1/4 to 1 1/2 HP and have different RPMs. I figure I could use a set of pulleys to step the speed down, but I don't know what to step it down to.

Frank
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby fowlweatherfowler » Fri Feb 19, 2016 1:30 pm

One thing I do is after rinsing and wringing it out I throw it in the washer on the spin cycle twice and then go to a shop vac on reverse. The washer gets a lot of water out. I also do not tumble my birds.

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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby Pete-pec » Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:34 pm

A lot of good suggestions.

Frank, thaw that skin in water over night instead of in the bag. It takes no time at all.

Wrapping the squeezed out skin in a towel then in a ziplock in the fridge either overnight or a couple hours will wick away most of the water. I then invert the skin, and borax the entire bird very heavy. Then I reinvert and borax the entire feather side. This method was shared to me by Brandon Gilmore who likely mounts the best flying birds in the U. S. Yep, I said it. This helps dry, and helps separate the feathers and allow you to dry much easier. We don't need to get into a discussion about gas. Some do it, some don't. As a dude who works in chemistry, it is simply an aid in evacuating water, and nothing more. So if you want to dry the skin faster, gas. If you want to dry the skin faster, and want a much more supple skin, get a pet drier like Brian suggested. I've tried convincing everyone who doesn't have one, to get one. Behind the flesher, it is without a doubt the best tool in my shop. This gets rid of the need for a tumbler, the medium in which you tumble in, and gas. Trust me. Like Beretta Brian said, ten minutes for the best groomed bird you can get. I understand that many people tumble, and I understand why they do it, but believe me when I tell you this. Many of the best of the best don't own one, who once did. The master blaster or a cheaper version is all you need. If you look online, you can find one for under 80 bucks. Everyone I have convinced has thanked me. Those that still use a blow drier like I did up until I got back from Eugene's don't understand what they are missing. Grooming with air is so much better than tweezing. You don't have to manhandle the bird skin. Blow, shake the skin vigorously, wire, shake, sew, shake, and I swear 95% of the feathers fall in place.
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Re: Building a tumbler

Postby Pete-pec » Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:38 pm

http://www.walmart.com/ip/45200088?wmlspartner=wmtlabs

If you can afford to assemble a tumbler, save your money for this instead. I will tell you that one of my buddies bought this model, and after 150 birds, he burned out the motor. He bought the master blaster, and hopes to get three times the life out of it. He saved many many hours in the shop by grooming and drying less, and to anyone in the business, time is money. So that unit paid for itself easily.
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