Some Good Pics

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Some Good Pics

Postby decoydog » Wed Dec 21, 2005 1:07 pm

I took these two brothers (who are teachers) from the big city, out for a good Phesant hunt.
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I shot these phesants on the way back to the truck after a bad day of duck hunting.
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My dog and I trcked this wiley, big rooster, after tracking him for over an hour before he presented me with a shot.
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I got these two along with the rooster above.
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It's hard to pull 1 inch through 6 inches of material while doing "the dance", and looking skyward.
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Postby Greg Wile » Wed Dec 21, 2005 3:06 pm

I cann't help but ask why are there leg bands on those pheasants? Makes one think that they are from a pheasant preserve/ pay to shoot farm. Just curious.
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Banded pheasants

Postby mjlduckman » Wed Dec 21, 2005 5:23 pm

I hear most of the pheasants on the west side are banded, not sure of the reason, decoydog will probably have the answer.
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Postby phutch30 » Wed Dec 21, 2005 5:42 pm

Usually states that release game farm birds for put and take hunting band or mark them to seperate them from wild birds. I think WA does this.
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Postby decoydog » Wed Dec 21, 2005 6:09 pm

Phesants that are banded are part of a phesant enhancement program that Washington state is taking part in, to try to re-establish the population in the state. Farmers are subsidized for raising pheasants for release back in the wild. Each farmer carries his own type of bands for his birds to show where they came from and to seperate the birds from wild ones. Several reasons have contributed to the fall in the pheasant population. First; Predators. Coyotes, magpies, and crows eat the eggs and young. Next, there are more and more hunters taking the birds with no chnce to recoop the losses. Last but not least, mismanagement. The politicians think that just throwing more money and more bird out there, it will solve the problem. With less habitat then before for the birds, and not being able as hunters, to take care of and thin out the predators like we should, we asre going to deal with farm raised phesants in the wild for quite some time.
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Postby gsphunter » Wed Dec 21, 2005 9:27 pm

decoydog wrote:there are more and more hunters taking the birds with no chance to recoop the losses.


I don't really see how hunting pressure would affect pheasant populations in a drastic way. The other reasons you mentioned are totally understandable, but hunter's are only shooting roosters. This leaves an entire hen pop. to reproduce.
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Postby decoydog » Wed Dec 21, 2005 9:53 pm

Hens cannot reproduce without roosters.
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Postby duckdog » Wed Dec 21, 2005 11:05 pm

In my opinion, the biggest problem for animals to deal with is the loss of habitat. Pheasant's are perhaps a little different, as they can live in almost anything, but they also need prime cover to nest in.


The roosters look a little different , than the ones we shoot in Iowa, there seems to be more white around the necks, is there a little difference in breed?, or is this a bird from a game farm. Not being sarcastic, just wandering. Nice pics!
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Postby decoydog » Wed Dec 21, 2005 11:35 pm

I have never seen a Iowa phesant, so I don't know what you are speaking of. As for the breed, it's a ring neck phesant. These are not game farm birds that have to be paid for, but mearley an effect of the issues that I stated above. Washington State has a low wild phesant population, thus we have to compensate with birds that are released in the wild. Don't be fooled, these birds, after spending a week in the wild, can be just as hard to get at times then a wild born bird. Just ask my dog. Oh, they taste the same too.
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Postby gsphunter » Thu Dec 22, 2005 1:37 pm

decoydog wrote:Hens cannot reproduce without roosters.


I can't remember the exact ratio, but 1:3 comes to mind. This means 1 rooster per 3 hens is plenty, because them cocks get around pretty good. :thumbsup: They ain't monogomous.
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Postby decoydog » Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:52 pm

gsphunter wrote:I can't remember the exact ratio, but 1:3 comes to mind. This means 1 rooster per 3 hens is plenty, because them cocks get around pretty good. They ain't monogomous.


Ok, lets just say that 1:3 ratio is the standard. LIKE I SAID ORIGINALLY, HENS CANNOT PRODUCE WITHOUT ROOSTERS. I typed that reeaaalll slow, so everyone could understand me. Unless you live and hunt up here, it is hard for you to comprehend what we are going through with our phesant population. To top it all off, I guess Iam having a hard time explaining it in a clear, consise manner, since Iam being drilled on it. Also, up here, phesants that you pay for on a game farm don't wear bands. Only the ones that are released back in the wild by the stae.
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Postby gsphunter » Fri Dec 23, 2005 9:16 am

Easy man, I'm not trying to drill you on anything, but I do think that people overestimate what effects hunters have on wild pheasant populations, but I guess I could be wrong in your part of the world.

In most cases, bird population has much more to do with predators, habitat, and weather conditions. Hell, there aren't many pheasants in Missouri, and there also aren't many hunters going after them. Still our pheasant popluations in the Northern part of the state suffer for the reason mentioned above.
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Postby decoydog » Fri Dec 23, 2005 10:46 am

gsphunter wrote:
Easy man, I'm not trying to drill you on anything


Sorry about that. I guess I was being a sensative little girl about it. Maybe if I was in someone else's position looking at pictures of banded phesants, I would think at first glance that were game farm birds that you would pay for then have released.
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Postby duckplucker » Sun Dec 25, 2005 10:12 am

Alright guys, easy with the back and forth. You've stated your opinions and that should be enough. If you want to pm each other about your differences, thats fine, but please no more on this thread. Thanks!

And good looking birds, congrats.
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Postby weedsnager » Sun Dec 25, 2005 10:40 am

nice pictures!
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