gun down

Trap, Skeet, Sporting Clays; pistol/rifle target shooting, to plinking cans with a bb gun.

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gun down

Postby harvey1b » Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:45 pm

I have been shooting skeet for awhile, and even though I have never shot a straight I have started shooting gun down b/c it is more like a real hunting situation, which in the end is what I am really practicing for.

I do pretty well until I get to the last station, where I have trouble getting my gun all the way up to my shoulder in time for the clay, and usually end up shooting almost from the hip. Does anyone have a suggestion how to get that thing up faster?

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Postby duckplucker » Tue Jun 13, 2006 2:37 pm

I'm not too sure if there is much you can do to get your gun up faster, other than practice. I do suggest that you get it all the way up to your eye before you shoot though, even if its a longer shot. You have a better percentage while aiming the gun at a farther target than you will shooting a closer target without aiming. To better your quickness of bringing a gun up (I have no idea if this will work or not, but you can try), whenever something goes by, or jumps up ( "flushes" ), try shouldering an imaginary gun. Like if you are on a walk and a bird jumps up and flys, "aim" at it. I hope that can help.
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Postby LaRedneck » Tue Jun 13, 2006 3:47 pm

I like where you going with this, I hate to see people, hunters that is practicing on the range with there gun already shouldered, thats not how you hunt and you shouldn't practice like that. Now with the last station you more or less have to start drawing as soon as you say pull.

Most of you timeing is going to come from muscle memory other than just being fast. Like cowboy action its reps that when them comps. My suggestion would be take a laser light or some form of light and tape it to the end of you gun and make a mark on the wall and practice about 10 to 20 times a night drawing the gun from your starting point to your shoulder keeping the light right on the target (mark) the whole time. This will help lessen the "brain to reaction time" and should help on the range.
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Postby harvey1b » Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:30 am

I was practicing mounting the gun during the evenings like you suggest. I'll go back to that. I read somewhere that mounting the gun is like a golf or baseball swing and that practicing the motion with slow repetitions builds muscle memory.

Correct me if I am wrong, but in international skeet I think the shooter is required to have the gun down. What do they do on station 8?

At station 8 that clay is moving and it is hard to get the beed on it quick enough, but shooting skket gun down for a while I have definately noticed a difference when it comes to hunting season. It is frustrating a little b/c I know I could shoot a clean round if I wasn't handicapping myself.
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Postby LaRedneck » Wed Jun 14, 2006 8:50 am

Those guys at internationals shoot for a living and have done it for YEARS, like we love to hunt they love to bust clays. To me its more of an antisapation thing. You know it coming because you are the one saying pull and you know where its coming from so, another thing, one day just go out and shoot a round from those two stations. You have to have a good mental game too, you have to learn to slow the clay down in your mind. SO if your watching that clay over and over again from that spot then eventually it look like a tweety bird floating in the wind.
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Postby duckplucker » Wed Jun 14, 2006 4:11 pm

Another thought I had would be if it is just one round thats giving you trouble, follow the path of the clay once or twice, without the gun. THen with a gun, but not shooting. During these, get to know the path the clay is going to follow. Then you will be able to point to a spot the clay will be at, and can follow it from there instead of trying to catch up to it.
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Postby thaner » Thu Jun 15, 2006 8:18 pm

I have shot registered everything to the point of boredom with trap and skeet. I changed to low gun for both for the fun and then took up sporting clays. Now they changed that to allow mounted gun. I still shoot low gun. Here is how you can put a lot of speed in your shooting. With this method you can shoot low gun from half way to the house from the normal #8 pad or closer if you get good. Check position and premount the gun so you are comfortable and in a natural position at the break point with the gun mounted. Then move slightly in the direction of the house and lower the gun. You want to start moving as soon as you call, but with practice you can wait until you see the target. I usually start to move and pick up speed as soon as you see the bird. The trick is to move and mount and be right on the target smooth and comfortable. Think of grabbing the bird with your leading hand like you are reaching right out for it. Touch your face to the stock at the same time your hand grabs the target and hit the trigger. This should all happen at the same time and in your neutral position. It's basically a snap shot. If you try to move, mount, track and shoot you will not get there in time.
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Postby Citori12 » Sat Jun 24, 2006 11:18 am

Its a requirement for sporting clays competition as well as international competition. If you want to find out if your gun shoots where you look then shoot from resting posistion. Also try sporting clays as the different targets give you amazing practice on all angles of shooting.
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Postby puddlerjumper » Sun Jun 25, 2006 10:04 am

You have to move your body as if you already had the gun to your shoulder, and as you move bring the gun up, that way as soon as it hits your shoulder you are in position to hit the target.
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Postby Citori12 » Sun Jun 25, 2006 11:02 am

For those who have read numerous literature on the art of shotgunning, there are some very basic things that makes us better wingshooters. Most of all and importantly is the shotgun must fit. You must be pointing where your looking (pointing not aiming, and both eyes open). I am a self taught shotgunner. Though lessons can be taken at reasonable fees, most of us choose to teach ourselves. I have been shooting .22's since I was old enough to lift one. Rifle shooting is precise. Shotgunning is not. Practicing under simulated field conditions is the best practice one can do if birds in the bag and fewer missed shots are the goal. I miss very little in the field as opportunities can be slim at times. After walking all day and jumping one rooster inside effective range at the close of shooting hours a miss here means no pheasant dinner and sore muscles. You will not walk around a field with the gun to your shoulder all day long, neither will you sit in a duck blind with the shotgun pointed over decoys. Therefore, having a gun that you can effectively mount, point, and shoot and have good success at the target is critical. This is why I never practice clay targets from a mounted gun posisition. And I am with puddlejumper. Its the motion and follow through that makes your shotgunning better!!!!
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