rats

Discussion on shooting predators & varmits and the trapping the furbearing animals.

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rats

Postby Rowdy » Fri Jun 17, 2005 2:56 pm

couple pix i thought i would share



[siteimg]596[/siteimg]

[siteimg]595[/siteimg]
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Postby Greg Wile » Fri Jun 17, 2005 4:29 pm

Rowdy,

Thought I would help you out with the pictures. They look good :thumbsup:
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Postby Rowdy » Fri Jun 17, 2005 5:20 pm

thanks for the help with the attachments

will add photos of these guys on stretchers when season comes :mrgreen:
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Postby 870 » Sat Jun 18, 2005 8:59 pm

please tell me there is a victor stop loss on his back leg :yes:
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Postby CALLEMQUACKTN » Sun Jun 19, 2005 8:24 am

Nice pic
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Postby Rowdy » Sun Jun 19, 2005 11:39 am

870 wrote:please tell me there is a victor stop loss on his back leg :yes:


lol nope illegal in nj

however there are a few 110 coni's ready for that spot when season comes
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Postby AlaskaRedneK » Sun Jul 03, 2005 12:33 am

So they have seasons on rats?

In AK, if it is in a legal hunting area.......NO season->NO bag limit :smile:

-Stouff
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Postby Rowdy » Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:23 am

in NJ you cant fart unless they tell you when and where
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Postby AlaskaRedneK » Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:04 pm

Dang...... You need to come on up here w/ a U-HAUL or somethin......

Those kinda restrictions bugg the hell out of me..... :hammering:
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Postby Greg Wile » Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:04 am

Just some info on Muskrats.

MUSKRAT (Ondatra zibethica)

Size
1-1.4 kg
(2-3 lb)

Young
4-8, May-July

Diet
aquatic plants

Life Span
3 years

Activity Pattern diurnal, year round
The muskrat is the largest North American member of the rats, mice, and lemmings at 40 cm to 50 cm in length. Fur colour varies from light brown to black, with light gray underparts. The long, black scaly tail is flattened on both sides. Found from the Gulf of Mexico to Alaska, muskrats are common throughout the marshes, lakes, and rivers of Nova Scotia.

Muskrats are excellent swimmers. Their webbed feet push them forward, while their tail acts as a rudder to steer them. They have waterproof fur and lips that can close behind the front teeth to allow for underwater chewing. Muskrats are mainly herbivorous, eating aquatic plants. Up to 80 per cent of their diet may be cattails and bulrushes. They occasionally eat mussels, clams, fish, and amphibians. Young muskrats may be eaten by large predatory fish or snapping turtles. Adult muskrats may be caught by foxes, coyotes, minks, hawks, owls, and eagles.

The best habitat for muskrat has roughly equal amounts of open water and above-water vegetation. Water deeper than two-thirds of a metre is preferred, as freezing to the bottom is unlikely, and depths less than 2 m are best for abundant vegetation. A system of channels and feeding platforms connects to bank burrows and muskrat houses built with mud and vegetation. The houses are constructed in late summer or fall. They vary from 1 m to 1.4 m in diameter and rise 30 cm to 75 cm above the water surface. Houses have one or two underwater entrances and at least one dry resting chamber. Bank burrows are similar in design and are preferred sites for raising young. A characteristic feature in winter are “push-ups,” which are domes of frozen vegetation covering an open plunge hole in the ice where muskrats can feed.
Build memories, take a kid out doors and teach them about nature by interacting with it, hunting and fishing.

Learn from the past, don't dwell on it.
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