Your famously named turkeys...

A wild turkey hunting forum for hunting turkeys in the spring and fall seasons.

Moderators: stumpjumper, MossyGO!

Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Indaswamp » Mon May 11, 2009 6:13 pm

Every experienced turkey hunter has met a turkey that they could not kill (legally) ...these birds all reach an esteemed status of earning a name. What are some of the stories that you guys have about famous turkey that you didn't kill ...or took you a few seasons to close the deal on him?

I'll weigh in after a few responses....
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 57619
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana


Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Pete-pec » Mon May 11, 2009 9:33 pm

My favorite bird was named Tom. I called him that simply because he was so close to me, but so far away. This bird would fly down in the morning, and gobble his head off for the entire morning, but for the life of me, he would never quite offer me the correct shot, always behind a tree, or an old piece of farm machinery, or a hen would cut him off, and most importantly he never left the comfort of the woods. I hunted him for my five-day season knowing I was going to get a shot at him, but I failed. He was a season breaker alright, and I couldn't wait to get an opportunity at him the following year. The piece of property where the roost was, is only a five acre woods, surrounded by open fields, and scattered throughout the woods are literally tons of old farm equipment that my uncle would buy at auctions, and allow them to rust away? He had the sickness bad (God rest his soul). I had plenty of places to set up on "Tom", but he would always skirt around me. Season two rolls around, and of course "Tom" is a bit older and wiser, and so am I! I figured the best way to lure him from his haunt, would be to lure his girls. There was always one dominant hen, that would screech at me, but I always called lightly in return, or not at all when she was talking. On the opening day of my second (again, 1 year later), I went and hid behind an old manure spreader, and used it as my blind. I had a jake decoy in full strut, and two hen decoys out in the field. As the birds were coming alive in the morning, I basically mimicked every sound that the dominant hen made. She was pissed! She was mad as hell, and I kept copying her. Of course "Tom" was gobbling every time we were in one of our calling battles. She'd call, and I'd cut her off. Originally I was using a diaphragm call, but I switched to an aluminum friction call. The Super Aluminator. If anyone has ever used one, it really puts out the sound! She finally had enough, and flew over my head, and out in the field and knocked over both my hen decoys. Old "Tom" flies down and hits the ground thundering, spitting, and drumming. He comes right behind me while I am watching the hen clucking her head off at the decoys she just ran over, and I can tell he is very close! I knew I had to make a move, because he normally stays in the woods. I slowly turn around, and I don't see him? I'm thinking where the hell did he go. At my back is an 8 foot cedar tree, and all of a sudden I see something moving through the branches of the tree. Well, it's "Tom's" head at only 8 feet. I had my 10 gauge at the time, so I decided to shoot him through the branches, because I'd be damned if he was going to get away from me this time!

Well, I hit him, and good for me, shooting through all the branches, didn't blow his head off. Being a hobbyist taxidermist, this was the first and only turkey I mounted for myself, and to make room, I mounted him in a flying position. He was nearly 26 pounds, had 1 and 1/8 inch spurs, an 11 inch beard, and a second beard very close in length. He was finally mine! The best part about this, giving a brief history on the Wild Turkey in Wisconsin. They were reintroduced with a Missouri strain in the 1980's (I believe). They were stocked about 150 miles from my home, and have spread and migrated there way to where I am hunting now completely on their own, with the original stocking numbers incredibly low. I call it a success story, while Farmers and Deer Hunters would call it a mistake. Anyway, the birds I was hunting on my Uncle's farm were not here 10 years ago! Now that hunt I described was quite a few years ago, but there are turkey everywhere now here in Wisconsin. Needless to say, I think it's a success story! So "Tom" is not the only bird that I may have nick-named, but he has the most sentimental value, and besides the bird my Son just during his first season ever, "Tom" will always be the bird I remember most! Here is a picture of "Tom", as you walk in my basement.

Pete
Attachments
_cfimg-5633898319681252474.jpg
_cfimg-5633898319681252474.jpg (17.97 KiB) Viewed 4025 times
_cfimg-544318073775542181.jpg
_cfimg-544318073775542181.jpg (16.64 KiB) Viewed 4025 times
User avatar
Pete-pec
Forum & State Moderator
 
Posts: 3139
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 7:39 am
Location: Southern Wisconsin

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Tue May 12, 2009 12:45 pm

Fantastic story, can't wait to hear more!
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Silverwidgeon » Tue May 12, 2009 2:24 pm

I give the Turkeys the name of the nearest mountain, hill, creek, or lake. I got a Clear lake Gobbler, a Knoxville Gobbler, and a Putah creek hen (shot in the fall)
"At times like these it's best to remember that there have always been times like these."
User avatar
Silverwidgeon
hunter
 
Posts: 598
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2008 9:20 pm
Location: Sonoma, CA

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby A-Bomb » Tue May 12, 2009 5:47 pm

I give em all the last name of Tom before season starts. And by seasons end i like to give them their first name, which is "My" to complete their name..."My Tom". :lol3: ...In all honesty, i never give them any nicknames, just trying to have some fun with this post. Killed allot of turkeys, never thought about naming one.
MDHA Saginaw Bay Chapter
http://www.midha.org/
User avatar
A-Bomb
hunter
 
Posts: 1051
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:05 pm
Location: Where the birds are

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Super Dave 32 » Tue May 12, 2009 6:25 pm

My son and I found one while scouting that we called "Snowball". His head looked like, well, a snowball (yes, we're pretty creative!). He is a big mature gobbler. We sat up the next morning about 200 yards from the roost. About 30 minutes after first light, here comes Snowball and four of his gobbler buddies along with about 30 hens. The hens ran (literally) to the DSD hen decoy and kicked the crap out of her. (My son had to shut his eyes to keep from laughing out loud at the sight of it!) Snowball and his buddies were close enough to shoot but they hung out where there was a cedar tree blocking my son's shot. Finally, one of his buddies moved far enough to the left to give my son a shot and down went Snowball's cousin. Good turkey with a nice 10" beard. Snowball will be there waiting for us next year with another 4" on his beard - I hope!
There was a group of jakes that a buddy and me called "The Thugs". There were four of them and they would run every tom they saw out of town. We watched them run off about 4 or 5 big toms. Those guys will be good shooters next season.
The only other birds that I've named are ones that hang up and never come in close enough to shoot but I can't mention what I call them on a family oriented website! :fingerpt:
The good old days are now!
User avatar
Super Dave 32
hunter
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 10:15 am
Location: Edmond, OK

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby cjg » Wed May 13, 2009 6:04 pm

Ole "Hockey stick" had a log beard with an L shape I never did get him and have never seen another one like him.
User avatar
cjg
hunter
 
Posts: 980
Joined: Wed Dec 17, 2008 1:46 am
Location: North Waterboro, Maine

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby woodduck31 » Thu May 14, 2009 9:19 pm

x
Last edited by woodduck31 on Fri Aug 12, 2011 5:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
woodduck31
hunter
 
Posts: 686
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:05 am

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Thu May 28, 2009 6:04 pm

Indaswamp, do you have a famously named turkey story?
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Indaswamp » Thu May 28, 2009 10:33 pm

NMBlackgold wrote:Indaswamp, do you have a famously named turkey story?


long...but you asked for it....

Yea...we got a few. most famous one is clockwise. Every time that turkey would come in, he would circle you....clockwise. He would come straight in to about 100-150 yards and gobble, then he would swing to the right and gobble 45 degrees to the right...then he would shut up - and sneak in either directly behind you or over your left shoulder. we lost count how many times either he or one of his hens busted us...don't know why that bird continued to do that move....

we hunted this bird for 2 seasons and still couldn't hair-lip him! The following season we donated a turkey hunt on this place to the local NWTF chapter to be raffled off at their banquet. A newbie that wanted to learn the ropes from the locally appointed expert turkey hunters bought it ( They had just stocked turkeys locally 4 years prior and some guys were curious about hunting 'em).
Well lo and behold...the morning arrived and Dad was to take this guy on the place. (My brother and I couldn't do it because we were scheduled to be in Mississippi-conflict on schedules-so dad said he'd take the guy-Thanks DAD!!) He was familiar with ole clockwise...he's the one that primarialy fooled with him the first season-and he's the one that named him. He handed him over to my brother and I the following season after calling him up directly behind him -10 yards on his off gun side and couldn't close the deal on opening day...he knew that it was the same bird...same M.O. he left him alone and went off to kill a hot 2 yr old to vent some frustration.

Well, Dad's got this new guy with him and ole clockwise gobbles from his favorite ridge...by this season ole clockwise has a long, loud, shrill, screaming gobble- the mark of a mature bird. he gobbles only once really early....a little later, other birds start gobbling and when some crows fly over ole clockwise, he lets out a blood curling, hair raising scream! All the other birds for a 800 yard radius shut-up! now, ole clockwise gets cranked up -knowing he owns the woods- the new guy says that he wants to hunt that bird because he read in the NWTF magazine that this ole bird must be the dominate bird since all the other birds shut-up...and he wants a trophy!
"O.K." Dad says...but we are in for a long drawn-out hunt...it won't be over and done with quick. This is one smart ole bird!!
Dad figured it was ole clockwise...didn't know for sure -just a gut feeling.

They eased up on the ridge to a flat that he knew birds roosted in that area liked to go to...not far from the edge of the ridge-and about 200 yards from where ole clockwise was roosted. There was an old cattle trail coming up the ridge in a saddle directly in front of where they set up...Dad figured that the bird would come up that trail...as had numerous birds he's killed from the very tree they set up against. piece of cake right!....Well dad let the woods wake-up...and when he heard the bird turn on the limb and gobble in his direction, right before fly-down, he used his wing and flew down.....no call...ole clockwise responded with a double -gobble that'll make your spine tingle!! dad wispered"he's going to pitch out to us-he's facing our way" and sure enough he did. He hit the ground at about 150 yrds. and gobbled on the ground. Dad told the newbie to point his gun at the cattle trail where it went down the ridge. 20 minutes go by and turkeys way far off could be heard gobbling...nothing out front. Finally, a hen appeared. Dad wispered"that bird should be coming behind those hens-keep your eye's sharp..."
Dad softly clucks and purrs...the hen answers....nothing. then she gets excited and immediately to the right at about 45 degrees ole clockwise lets out a scream 120 yards away! the newbie is startled by the gobble, his gun barrel twitches and the hen's head goes up...she's looking now. she clucks...she's about 100 yards away ...luckly, the cows in the field walk by not 200 yards behind them ...one of 'em bellows and that calms her down..she goes back to feeding and milling around, slowly walking to the right. She finally goes over the ridge out of sight. Dad whispers to the newbie"that turkey is going to walk up the draw behind us and come in around over our left shoulder behind us- I want you to put your back to where that bird just gobbled."
"The newbie is in complete SHOCK!! This is not in any book he's ever read, he's thinking that this old man wants to shoot this bird for himself!"
So as Dad turns his head and faces to where he just told the newbie to face, the newbie stays put....with his back to the flat and the field way behind it. Dad is intense...he know now that it's ole clockwise he's fooling with....And he knows that clockwise likes to go up the draw in the saddle between them and the field....where he is not visible from this vantage point...and circle around over the left shoulder as you face the roost...He knows that if this newbie just does as told...he will get a shot at a true trophy gobbler. About this time, a young two yr. old gobbles down in the draw, about 200 yards past where ole clockwise last gobbled. Dad knows it ain't the same bird-not the newbie...he's fit to be tied with the adrenilin and excitement-he thinks it's ole clockwise going away!
25 minutes go by, Dad knows that ole clockwise is taking his time - like the direction he always likes to come in. Just then, Dad sees a glimps of white way off at 120 yards...his blood is pumping now! here comes showdown time!!! the bird is big, throwing his weight from side to side...almost waddling. He stops-looking....about that time, the 2yr. old gobbles 150 yards closer...the newbie is beside himself....he's thinking the game is going according to plan, just like in the books and hunting shows...Boy was he wrong!!
Ole clockwise raises his head just slightly....and turns one eye in dismay to the direction of the gobble...he knows that young bird won't step foot on this flat....so does Dad. The hen that walked off reappears directly behind dad, in the direction of the 2yr. old. She starts yelping when she reaches the top of the ridge...the 2yr. old gobbles. not 100 yards away. Clockwise just breaks down into strut...walking directly to dad-but behind the newbie facing the wrong way. The ole bird is walking slowly in strut....the hen is going to him now...the hen stops and clucks. Then she does some excited cutting and yelping ....ole clockwise can't stand it and let's out a scream so loud that the newbie is startled again. Oh SH!T!!!!
Oh sh!t is right...he's in the wrong position. Dad just marvels at the show not 40 yards in front of him. he whispers to the newbie..."take him"-nothing. "shoot that bird!"
The newbie whispers back"I can't!! I'm facing the wrong way!!"
Dad sighs...the guy blew it. ole clockwise gobbles again, and the hen runs over to him....they walk off away from dad not spooked. The 2yr. old wasn't heard from again that morning.
Dad finally calls in ole clockwise and outsmarts one tough ole bird and the shooter blows it!!
Dad is BEEMING inside-he knew he could kill him if he roosted there again!! The newbie is dejected!!
Dad stands up, and walks over to the newbie...asks him "why didn't you turn around?"
"I thought you were joking...I thought you were going to kill that bird-and wanted me to face the other way so I couldn't get a shot..."
Dad explains the story with ole clockwise and the newbie receives some very valuable education...when you are in the woods with someone that is way more experienced at hunting turkeys than you-on their home turf-do as you are instructed....your odds go up exponetially that way....ask questions later!!
about this time, another bird gobbles off in the direction of the truck. dad says to the guy, "lets go get on another bird shall we....this time do as I say O.K."
The guy ends up killing a hot suicidal 2 yr. old that worked on a string late in the morning..he followed Dad's instructions to a T ...he is happy and says so...but continues to regret not listening to Dad earlier.

Two weeks later, Dad ends up killing ole clockwise from the same tree...he did the same thing and he knew the bird was dead when went to the right....gobbles in the same spot....
He was a big bird indeed for Mississippi-23 lbs. had 1 1/2" spurs with a thick 11" beard. This bird was at least a 4 yr old...maybe 5. I was glad Dad was the one to kill him, he deserved to be the one to hair lip 'em...after enduring the newbie....and the newbie was right-Dad did kill him-just not the day he suspected!!
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 57619
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Fri May 29, 2009 11:29 am

Good story....well worth the wait!
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Fri May 29, 2009 1:14 pm

Not sure if it quite fits the subject, but here goes....

When I rolled into Deer Park, Florida in April, 2009 riding a wave of Texas Rios and an Osceola County severe thunderstorms that had brought much needed rain to central, Florida, I did not realize I would be participating in a ritual pursuit of a legendary Osceola gobbler named the “Double Wooden Gate Gobbler.” This bird had haunted hunters, in quest of their grandslam, since the spring of 2007. He had been named the “Double Wooden Gate Gobbler” (DWGG) not by me, but by the owner of the 25,000 acre, Osceola Co. cattle ranch and his plethora of experienced guides who themselves and their clients have been dumbfounded by him over the last several turkey seasons.

Apparently as a 3-4 year old bird in 2007, with an estimated 1 3/8ths spur and 10” beard, DWGG took up residence at a pinch point in a pine lot that separated two large pastures, access to the rear pasture was via a squeaky double wooden gate. Prior to the start of the 2007 season, guides had spotted him, with his harem, several times, and deemed him worthy of pursuit. DWGG would pitch down off a pine limb, onto the gate, and gobble once, when his harem joined, they would march off across the open pasture to spend the day in the wide open. Well DWGG managed to escape the barrels of 6 different hunters and two experienced guides in 2007. In 2008, as a 4-5 year old bird, DWGG managed to escape the same group of hunters who were insistent that they at least try for the majestic bird that had eluded them the previous year. This spring, as a 5-6 year old bird, DWGG was nearly inaccessible, sporting an estimated 2 1/8th spur (according to legend), he knew all the tricks and apparently was not going to be taken down by anything short of a massive coronary.

I arrived late in camp, on the last week of the season, to an impressive display of hanging gobblers (including one giant with a 1 5/8” spur) and a camera crew who were filming for a regional outdoor TV show. To my amazement, everyone was packing up and leaving and I would be the only one in camp that night. I met my guide Pat, and explained that I wanted to shoot my shotgun a time or two prior to the hunt. I have learned the hard way not to trust airport security when it came to my scopes. They find it a neat toy.

As I was unpacking, I was picking up bits and pieces of conversation about a big gobbler that several hunters (in their group) had taken a crack at but with no success. The gobbler inhabited a pinch point between two palmetto/pine thickets that separated two large pastures; access to the rear pasture was via a squeaky double wooden gate. Apparently it was a large gobbler with spurs over 2 1/4” (he grew), and beard in the 11” to 12” range. They had video of him from the previous morning and wanted to show me, but I was weary eyed from a 17 hour day and was tired of looking at gobblers on TV. I had no idea what was in store the next morning, only that Pat would pick me up at 0530, and from the looks of the hanging gobblers, I was in the right zip code.

The first morning was a hasty start as we had a 45 minute drive to the hunting area. On our way over, my guide Pat explained the set up, I was happy that he had it all planned out, and all I had to do was seemingly pull the trigger. He had decided to set up a blind in a palmetto patch near the edge of a large pasture. First light greeted us with dead silence, no gobbling, no clucking, no nothing. As the edges of the pasture began to illuminate, I could see birds moving in our general direction through the binoculars. We could tell it was a mixture of jakes, hens, and one giant gobbler. The gobbler was busy, running off approximately 12 jakes and escorting 8 hens. My guides soft calling only managed to attract the 12 jakes who stood outside the blind for about 20 minutes as the big gobbler worked his way easily around the blind ....out of range. The rest of the morning was spent glassing him and his harem in the corner of the pasture ,a full half mile from our erected blind, strutting his stuff and needling off a cluster of confident jakes.

The second morning was less hectic, we arrived early and set up in the corner of the pasture where DWGG spent the mid and late morning the previous day strutting. As the darkness broke, we could make out DWGG making his way across the open pasture with his harem of hens, he had not made a sound on or off the roost. With no jakes in sight, we thought he would angle toward us and our decoy, but of course, he angled away and began strutting his stuff next to our erected blind from the previous morning, 600 yards away on the other side of the pasture. We watched him for about 2 hours through the binos, we were hoping the jakes would show up and push him toward our corner….the same as yesterday. The jakes did show, but kept their distance from the big gobbler for the most part.

About 11:00 am or so, the gobbler, hens, and jakes had moved off just out of our view over a gentle rise in the pasture, Pat decided it was time to make a move toward him. We had been pinned down all day, afraid to make a move, so it was a welcomed maneuver. We slowly made our way (on our hands and knees) along the edge of the pasture in what was a wide, shallow drainage. The drainage contained a few clusters of large trees that provided some cover. Our path should intercept the gobblers last position in about 500 or 600 yards.

About an hour into our crawl, we saw DWGG, in full strut, walking slowly behind his hens, 80 yards in front of us. They were walking with us so it seemed (to me) impossible to catch up on our hands and knees. Pat tried calling a few times, but they would not stop nor even look interested. In what was a bold decision, a frustrated Pat decided that when he (Gobbler) disappears behind a palmetto hedge, which was a mere 10 feet in diameter and 6 feet tall, he would spook his hens off. DWGG walked out of sight behind the hedge, Pat raised and waved his arms, the hens took off like bullets into the pine/palmetto thicket. DWGG emerged from the other side of the hedge, apparently confused as to why everyone had run off. One call from Pats diaghram sent DWGG running toward us in a panic, only to be met by a grapefruit -sized ball of hevi-shot at 25 yards.

He was a magnificent bird, you could tell he was old, his body was thin and a bit frail looking. I estimated maybe 18lbs at the most. I don't think he had eaten in 3 days. His beard was long (11”) but thinning. His legendary 2 ¼” spurs were 1 7/8. Pat congratulated me, we loaded up the bird and headed back to the lodge.

As I sat stroking my fingers through his majestic tail feathers, the other guides and owner of the ranch began to assemble and told me how lucky I was to have harvested this great bird, and spoke of the great memories and encounters they had had with him. As they spoke, I felt sad…. as if a family member had been lost, but proud that I could claim such a legendary bird……….

I am currently having the bird mounted and sent for display at the Osceola County hunting lodge ........were he belongs.
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Indaswamp » Sat May 30, 2009 3:25 am

Awesome NMblackgold!! That's definitely what it's all about...and definitely where he belongs. You were the shooter -no doubt, but the guide did the hard part calling the shots to get you the change to take him. I know the feeling harvesting a turkey like that...I'll tell the story of ole grande next...but I got to get some sleep-just got in from bowfishing redfish and had a blast! shot some nice fish for the grill...
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 57619
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Sat May 30, 2009 11:19 am

Indaswamp wrote:Awesome NMblackgold!! That's definitely what it's all about...and definitely where he belongs. You were the shooter -no doubt, but the guide did the hard part calling the shots to get you the change to take him. I know the feeling harvesting a turkey like that...I'll tell the story of ole grande next...but I got to get some sleep-just got in from bowfishing redfish and had a blast! shot some nice fish for the grill...


Thanks Indaswamp, yes I owe everything to my guide, I make know claims I did anything special, just followed instructions (I did have two bloody knees, two bloody elbows, and a shotgun action full of white sand). I would have never made that manuever he did (spooking the hens). Its part of my arsenal now though! Would love to post some pics but can't get them down to proper size, I tried all your suggestions........very frustrating. Looking forward to hearing about "Ol Grande"..............

Take care
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Indaswamp » Sat May 30, 2009 3:40 pm

I would have never made that manuever he did (spooking the hens). Its part of my arsenal now though!


We have done this when the right circumstances present the opportunity... It is awesome how a bird that was previously untouchable and would not even acknowledge your calls suddenly becomes panicked and trips over himself running to the same call after you flush his hens!! Sounds like a first rate guide to me!!

When I have more time to type it...I'll tell the story of Ole Grande...
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 57619
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Thu Jun 18, 2009 9:50 pm

Indaswamp, don't leave us hangin with Ol Grande!!
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Mon Jun 22, 2009 7:55 pm

Hope Indaswamp didn't Fallindaswamp.....
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby 1FowlHNTR » Tue Jun 23, 2009 12:38 am

NMBlackgold wrote:Hope Indaswamp didn't Fallindaswamp.....

:lol: THAT WOULD MAKE HIM UNDATHASWAMP... :yes:
SERVICE MEMBERS....If you do not want to stand BEHIND US, feel free to stand IN FRONT OF US...
NRA LIFE MEMBER
DELTA WATERFOWL MEMBER
DUCKS UNLIMITED MEMBER
DUCK COMMANDER "DUCKAHOLICS" MILITARY MEMBER
REFUGE RAT MILITARY MEMBER
User avatar
1FowlHNTR
hunter
 
Posts: 191
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 1:50 pm
Location: Republic of Texas

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Tue Jun 23, 2009 6:51 pm

:lol: ......last we heard, indaswamp.....aka undathaswamp......was going to take catch some sleep after a day of bowfishing.......thats quit a nap he is taking!! Maybe he is putting together a documentary on Ol Grande!! Should be good!
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby 1FowlHNTR » Thu Jun 25, 2009 1:40 pm

:lol: :lol:

maybe now he is trying to get OUTADASWAMP??
SERVICE MEMBERS....If you do not want to stand BEHIND US, feel free to stand IN FRONT OF US...
NRA LIFE MEMBER
DELTA WATERFOWL MEMBER
DUCKS UNLIMITED MEMBER
DUCK COMMANDER "DUCKAHOLICS" MILITARY MEMBER
REFUGE RAT MILITARY MEMBER
User avatar
1FowlHNTR
hunter
 
Posts: 191
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 1:50 pm
Location: Republic of Texas

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Thu Jun 25, 2009 2:42 pm

1FowlHNTR wrote::lol: :lol:

maybe now he is trying to get OUTADASWAMP??


:lol: Hope hes' not stuck INDACRAPPER...... :smile:
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby Indaswamp » Sun Jun 28, 2009 9:48 pm

Nice play on words guys....I guess I did leave ya'll hanging. Yes, I did catch some sleep. Been out at the camp a lot recently working on summer projects. Indaswamp has been ONDAFISH!! Been on a good run with Red Snapper, Mangroves and amberjacks. And of course Speckled trout and Redfish...been slamming 50-60 bull Reds in the 10-35lb. range. We have a family fishing trip planned down in Venice july 15-18th and we are getting the camp in shape for the trip-installing a floating dock/pier on the front of houseboat for easier docking of more than one boat...

O.K. - Here's the story of Ole Grande....Again, Kinda long.....

We had just started filming and good places with the right kind of open woods and lots of turkeys were hard to come by. I was at the outdoor show in Oklahoma City in march of 2001 and a late winter snow storm hit- dropped 10" of snow. Fun I'll tell ya-but since I use to live in Tulsa for a while- I was use to driving in it so no problem. We ended up having a great show-sold all of our inventory and the trip was worth it-made a lot of contacts...everyone has "the perfect spot" to film-or so they say from their limited knowledge. I weed through the contacts ....one has my interest big time cause it is smack dab i the middle of eastern turkey heaven-Missouri. We call the guy and hit it off with him-he's a real down to earth guy, him and his Dad have access to a large tract of land and he offers for us to come up for the entire season to film...game on...

We end up finishing a hunt in Oklahoma and drive through the night to film the youth hunt in missouri-they have two big birds roosted gobbling their fool heads off starting at 4:30 am every morning...we have been in a slump so this is welcome news. With the late spring-the birds are lonely and hammering hard right now. We get in late and crash-alarm sounds and we are off the next morning-the young boys are 12 and 13-both are great woodsmen-been hunting since they could carry a gun....kinda like most of us on DHC. They are excited to be on film and we coach them on how it will play out if the birds cooperate-this all over a huge breakfast that mom has been in the kitchen cookin since about 3:30 a.m. About this time, I have finished eating and one of the boys asks if he could hunt with me-I say sure...
Then he asks," hey, you wanna hear my bird gobble?"
"Right now? it's still a little early isn't it?" I say.
"naw..he ought to start in a bit...I been hearin him for the last 9 days-roosted in the same spot."
"O.K.", I say just to humor the kid. "let's go see if he's awake."
We walk outside and the boy gives me a nervous glance. "what's he been gobbling at?" I ask
"Anything-but he really likes the owls. Roosters some-but not this early."
"You been waiting for real owls to crank him up, or have you been calling to him?"
"I have been callin-but not too much-just enough to get the real owls stirred up."
"Well let him have it." I say-It's the boys hunt and it's his bird, I want him to have some fun...
"hooooooot.....wak, wak, wak, wak-hooot" The boy lets off a hoot/screech that sounded like it came from a world champion caller.
"Gooooobbbble, Gooobbbbbbble"
"There he is!!!" The boy exclaims!!! And I am truly stunned-speechless. This kid is good-really good. The turkey gobbling this early was definitely a good thing.
the rest of the guys inside heard the boy sound off with his owl an they all came outside -curious....
"He ain't gobbling yet is he?" asks the guy we hooked up with-(lets call him Dave)
"Yea! he just gobbled right there where I said he was!!" And the boy points to a finger ridge off in the moonlight about 500 yards across the pasture.
"Well hell...I guess we better get going-we got a turkey to kill!" Says Dave. Owls begin to get stirred up and the turkey keeps gobbling and gobbling and gobbling.....
We make up a game plan-Indawood, my brother, teams up with one of Daves friends and they go off to another farm about 5 miles away with the other boy on the other hot bird. I start gathering my camera gear, checking tapes, batteries, etc....going through the routine. It's to be Me, Dave, the boy Justin and his Dad (Dad's does not hunt at all just along to watch-more on this later)
Dave has been on the farm scouting the bird and knows where the bird pitches out and which direction the bird likes to travel.
He has a good spot picked out on a point of trees 40 yards from the gobblers favorite strut zone-where the bird is seen every morning. "Awesome" I am thinking-all the while with listening to the gobbling from the lonely bird....

We ease our way out along the tree line so as not to be seen in the moonlight...we set up, all the while the bird is gobbling his fool head off. Dave sets up over my left shoulder 30 yards back in the trees with Dad, I set the camera up with a good view of the pasture down towards the corner 200 yards away where the treeline turns going away from me. the bird is about 300 yards away up on the ridge on the other side of the tree line-about 150 yards from the corner...we wait.

As gobbling light approaches (though that's not really rellevent this morning) more turkeys start to sound off in the distance.
"There is a bigger bird on my uncles place up behind us-His name is Grande-but he's been too hard to kill the past two years. So I wanted to try and kill this bird I been seein from the house. He's big and he's been gobbling good."

This was the first time I had heard of Grande...my curiousity was up....but first we had a turkey to kill...

This bird gobbled more than any turkey I have ever heard-before or since- I lost count of the number of gobbles, double gobbles, and triple gobbles that bird made that morning. I kept count once I sat down-till he came into view and I had to focus on filming the bird....last count was 539 gobbles....he actually gobbled more than that starting at around 4:30 a.m. that morning...
Once the bird hit the ground, he came in on a string gobbling the whole way in. The set-up was perfect and Dave only called a few times, fly down and a few yelps and cuts...the bird was dead and flopping at 6:29 a.m.- got it all on film too...Justin was as happy as a boy could be. The bird weighed 26 lbs. had a 12 3/4" beard and 1 3/8" spurs. Not bad for your second turkey ever. Justin was talking excitedly non-stop about the hunt. Then he says," Hey Mr. - I want you guys to kill Grande. I know you guys can do it."
Dad walks up at this point-" you sure you want them to hunt the double bend? You got sole rights to it this season...your uncle wants you to kill ole grande."
"I know dad...This hunt was so awesome-I can't do any better rest of the season. I want them to kill him-he is one tough bird."
This was the first time I had ever been "gifted" a gobbler by a 12yr. old.
"O.K. justin...It's your choice if you want to give your turkey away."

We head back up to the house...turkeys gobbling all around us as we walk...justin says,"I got all the birds I want right hear to hunt. I want you guys to kill some too-and Grande ain't no easy bird! If you can kill him-you earned him. Every time he gobbles-all the other birds shut up. He's the biggest bird anyone in town has ever seen. Lots of people stop on the road to look at him. he's the talk of the town."

Justin's description of Grande's size was an understatement-first time I saw him I thought- how can that bird fly?

After pictures and cleaning the boys birds-the other boy got his bird too-we went to talk to the boys uncle about ole Grande...

Uncle Tom's House:
After watching the tape and listening to Justin tell the story of his hunt that morning to his uncle and then some small talk, Uncle tom brings the conversation around to Ole Grande....
"He's the biggest bird I have ever seen...And I've seen many in my time. Killed a pile of 'em too..Justin here says he wants to give the bird to you guys..I gave him to Justin after fooling with him for two seasons cause you can't learn how to kill turkeys if you only hunt the easy ones. I gave him free reign of my place-all 2700 acres. If he wants to give him to you-that's his choice. Ain't nobody else allowed on the place-It's all yours"

Thus begins our quest for Ole Grande...The first of 3 seasons..what a saga it was. I don't think I will ever hunt that hard for one turkey ever again....

I'll continue with part 2 later-my fingers are tired and need a break-
The Cajun 7 Course Meal; 1 lb. of boudin and a six pack of Abita beer.

Save the Marsh, Eat a Nutria!

Never fart in your waders, it'll give you WORTS.
User avatar
Indaswamp
Forum Moderator
 
Posts: 57619
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:40 pm
Location: South Louisiana

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Mon Jun 29, 2009 6:08 pm

good part 1 indaswamp, cant wait to hear the conclusion..
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby NMBlackgold » Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:05 pm

4 months later...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
NMBlackgold
hunter
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:52 pm
Location: Las Cruces, NM

Re: Your famously named turkeys...

Postby jasonphoto01 » Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:00 pm

Ive hunted with indaswamp and indawoods alot the past 2 years and they definently have a wealth of knowledge and some great stories. Theres alot of good times had by the fire at the camps. This is what its all about!!!
jasonphoto01
hunter
 
Posts: 949
Joined: Sat Aug 27, 2005 11:55 am
Location: Sportsmans Paradise, Louisiana

Next

Return to Turkey Hunting Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest