millet/ wild rice questions

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millet/ wild rice questions

Postby duckmanz71 » Thu Jun 03, 2010 5:56 pm

Not sure if I am posting in the right forum or not, but I have a few questions on planting japanese millet, or wild rice. I have no prior experience with planting any of this so bear with me. I'm looking at planting some kind of wild food for ducks in a small wetland on my family's hunting property. I would probably describe it as a dead timber hole in the woods and it is probably about 3 to 4 acres in size. Also, keep in mind that I am in the northeast part of the country near the canadian border in NY state. Let me start by saying that this little hole is located in the middle of hard woods about 200 yards from a small river that my 80 acre family deer hunting property is located. In the past, I have jumped a few ducks here and there,mostly woodies out of there while I am deer hunting in October and early November. Also many times while sitting on watch, I hear and see many ducks flying the river so there are ducks in the area. Now, if there was a good food source, being close to a river where ducks traffic by, I think I could turn it into a good hunting hole, especially because it has a bit of a timber feel to it and up here in NY we dont get much timber hunting. My question is, is it to late to try and plant anything at this point in early summer? Also which crop is my best bet? I thought Japanese millet had to be planted on a dry area and then flooded after it has grown in, and rice seeds can be thrown right in the water an it is pretty hardy stuff, and rice will over take the natural vegitation. Keep in mind that it is in the middle of the woods so it may not get as good sunlight as say an open marsh would, also, there is some natural grass growing in and around the waters edge which has already come up. What would I have to do to get whatever crop I end up planting to over take the natural vegitation so that the crop thrives? Any input is appreciated.


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Re: millet/ wild rice questions

Postby jonnyb » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:47 am

I assume the area holds water all the time.... You could.... Open the area up a bit by thinning out some trees...... that alone might get them coming in. Might try to talk to a local biologist or someone who could help you find a more native plant that would act as a food source. or maybe find something better to plant something that would benefit both deer and ducks....you go in there and bang away at ducks the deer just might move on ya
"Honey how many other women you know, Husbands get up early in the morning and spend all day laying face down in the mud to bring their wifes home a duck for dinner......"
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Re: millet/ wild rice questions

Postby C-Hawk19 » Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:34 am

i have a similar situation except mine is a creek with a beaver dam to make a little pond i went in and broke the dam and planted corn and cleared the edge and did the same so i can deer hunt it then flood it before deer season and duck hunt it you may want to try that. i don't know about what will grow well in your neck of the woods but down here the yellow gold is a favorite for everything. also i think your info on rice might be off because it is not real hardy. it can grow fine on dry ground actually the reason it is planted in water is weed pertection. preferably slightly funning water will keep weeds from growing and let rice grow. millet however is typically pretty hardy. i think jap can be put straight into the water but i'm not certain. hope this is helpful.
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