Haliburton KNEW cement for BP well was "unstable"

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Haliburton KNEW cement for BP well was "unstable"

Postby Indaswamp » Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:24 pm

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-10-28/halliburton-knew-cement-used-in-failed-gulf-well-was-unstable-panel-finds.html

Oct. 28 (Bloomberg) -- The cement Halliburton Co. recommended to seal BP Plc’s Macondo well was unstable in tests and may have contributed to the April 20 blowout, the staff of a national commission investigating the accident said.


And the market reaction was swift:
Uh, Halliburton KNEW The Cement Was Defective? (NYSE: HAL)
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Re: Haliburton KNEW cement for BP well was "unstable"

Postby SpinnerMan » Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:38 pm

Any clue what that means? Does that mean its a pain in the ass to pour, the properties of the solidified concrete are unpredictable, or ? I don't even know what this means and can't find anything that helps.

I would assume that they test the concrete after it has set. Although who knows if they test it or test it adequately. This may or may not be some smoking gun. It may simply be jargon for it being a pain in the ass to work with.
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Re: Haliburton KNEW cement for BP well was "unstable"

Postby Indaswamp » Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:55 pm

SpinnerMan wrote:Any clue what that means? Does that mean its a pain in the ass to pour, the properties of the solidified concrete are unpredictable, or ? I don't even know what this means and can't find anything that helps.

I would assume that they test the concrete after it has set. Although who knows if they test it or test it adequately. This may or may not be some smoking gun. It may simply be jargon for it being a pain in the ass to work with.

(this is just from my limited knowledge talking to people in the industry...but here goes...)

The cement has high pressure nitrogen in it...the cement hardens via chemical reaction with certain pressure (heat) as the flash point to start the reaction. The nitrogen is used to keep the cement fluid, and once under pressure, the nitrogen compresses and allows the cement to set. too much Nitrogen and the cement won't set. there was a great technical article about this on the oil drum web site a while back...
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