Baiting

For those who enjoy duck hunting in the fields, this is the place.

Moderator: Skyblaster7

Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Tue Oct 30, 2012 2:28 pm

In the HARVESTED rice field we are hunting in this year, a lot of the waste grain decided to grow since the farmer did not burn the field. The majority of the new rice plants are not fully mature, and are only as tall as the harvested rice stubble, or smaller. My question is, if we roll a hole in the rice stubble for the ducks to land, will we technically be baiting, since we will be rolling over the new rice plants, too?

The farmer did not intend to make a second crop. This rice is strickly coming up voluntarily.

Thanks
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm


Re: Baiting

Postby Rick Hall » Tue Oct 30, 2012 4:17 pm

If the volunteer rice matures and you roll it, that is baiting, regardless if the farmer's intent. But if you roll it before the new rice heads or while it is still milk stage (soft), it is not baiting.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 12819
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Tue Oct 30, 2012 6:27 pm

some of the rice plants have rice starting to show, but it does not look anything like a mature rice plant. How do I know if it is in the milk stage (or soft)? Again, some of the new rice plants are only as tall as the stubble (so maybe 1.5 feet tall).

Thanks for your response
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby Rick Hall » Tue Oct 30, 2012 6:35 pm

If you pinch a kernel, it will be soft and milky, but basically if the hulls are green, you're OK. Just don't let much of it start to turn before you roll it.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 12819
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Tue Oct 30, 2012 6:39 pm

Thanks...I feel much better. We are rolling it this week when we flood, so it wont have much longer to grow. All parts of the plants are green, so I should be ok. Again thanks for all your help! :bow:
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby Rick Hall » Tue Oct 30, 2012 6:48 pm

Then you should be fine. And, fwiw, we sometimes have the same rice issue, and what I've relayed came straight from sitting down with a federal agent and a copy of the regs.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 12819
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:17 pm

Good to hear from someone who has had the same issue. Just curious, how did ducks react to a field with rice growing, compared to a field that was harvested and had no "baby" rice plants growing in it? We were worried that since the waste grain was starting to grow that there would not be a lot of excess rice grains to attract ducks. Is this a valid concern?

Thanks
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby Rick Hall » Wed Oct 31, 2012 5:12 am

When second crop hasn't been cut, we've payed to have combines come harvest wide strips by the blinds and haul it away, so we could legally roll the stubble in that part of the field to open it up and leave the standing (and eventually falling) feed in the rest of the field. But while you would think the birds would be drawn to all that flooded grain, our results have been mixed, depending on whether geese take the field. If geese get in there and knock down a lot of it, ducks will follow suit and use what they've opened up, but they seem more attracted to the open water than the standing rice. If geese don't knock down the rice, it gets surprisingly little duck use. And that's with grain present and not just plants that probably won't head out due to colder temps. So in your case, I'd definitely want to roll it all and count on the open water for draw.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 12819
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Wed Oct 31, 2012 6:58 am

Where are you located jt? As rick has pointed out you should be fine as long as the heads are milky. Rice resprouts and regrows all the time, but it rarely ever matures for us. If your field hasn't been flooded its very unlikely that it had enough moisture to fill the heads.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:47 am

The field is located in eastern Arkansas. We are going to be rolling areas in front of and behind the pit that are about 40 x 40 yards, so we will have about an 80 x 40 yard opening. We also have areas on the corners of the fields that dont have as much stubble where we will put our layout blinds. I do not know if the opening we are creating is big enough or not, but maybe geese will help open some more holes.
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Wed Oct 31, 2012 12:10 pm

I wouldn't worry about the rice heading out. How big is your field? I would want a much larger hole rolled down.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Wed Oct 31, 2012 1:27 pm

It is about a 50 acre field. How much larger are you thinking? A couple of years ago, we had a 40 acre field that was completely rolled, and we had trouble with ducks wanting to land in the middle of the field out of range (probably because of something we did wrong). We thought that haveing stubble standing and a smaller open water area would help control where they land....that and better concealment, better decoy spread, etc. Also, as previously stated, the corners of the fields will have open water, where there is not as much stubble.

I really appreciate all the feedback!
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Wed Oct 31, 2012 5:04 pm

You're not going to have many options with only 50 acres. We typically roll an entire 160 acre field. Is your pit in the middle or on the edge of the field? If your hole is only 40 yards in each direction ducks are in range before they can even land. Our decoy spreads would barely fit in that.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Wed Oct 31, 2012 6:37 pm

Thanks for all the great tips. The pit is in the middle of the field. There are also pretty wide areas where the tractors knocked down stubble while harvesting. We were thinking those would serve as decent "landing strips" for ducks to come into our open water. However, it may be necessary for us to go ahead and just increase our open water area.

How many decoys do you guys use in your spread. Sounds like quite a spread if it takes up that amount of space.

Thanks
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:43 am

What's around you as far as other flooded fields? We use over300 in our spread. I like to put the outside edge of my decoys at the end of gun range.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:10 am

Everyone has just started flooding their fields, so it is hard to tell which field are going to be hunted. The fields that normally get hunted were equally planted with soy beans and rice. We normally have about 200 or so decoys out as well. Normally, in other fields, we have only been able to put out all our decoys on one side of the pit. This year we have a setup where we can put out decoys on both sides.
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Thu Nov 01, 2012 3:55 pm

You're limited with what you can do by the size of you field. I'd probably roll the entire thing. Another option is rolling stuble as the year goes on, but you don't really have enough room to do much.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Baiting

Postby jtwodrff » Tue Nov 06, 2012 12:04 pm

When we roll our field what is a good depth for it to be flooded?
jtwodrff
hunter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:28 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Tue Nov 06, 2012 7:41 pm

I like for it to be just deep enough to float decoys around our pits. Ducks prefer water that they can stand up in when feeding. Some fields provide big open water and ducks like deeper water, but your field isn't big enough to provide that.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR

Re: Baiting

Postby Rick Hall » Wed Nov 07, 2012 5:09 am

The shallower the flood, the bigger and prettier the birds. Rub with that in a lease situation can be getting more as evaporation takes its toll, so be clear with whoever provides your water on whether they'll crank the pump again if there's no rain and you need more. It's common here for the lease to cover one or two pumpings only, and another may cost a pretty penny.
If you think I'm wrong, you might be right.
User avatar
Rick Hall
hunter
 
Posts: 12819
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2009 8:03 pm

Re: Baiting

Postby ByersFarm » Thu Nov 08, 2012 7:34 am

We normally have enough precip to more than account for evaporation in east AR. We actually flood all of our fields shallow before season starts to save on pumping costs. Mother nature takes care of the rest for us.
http://www.byersfarm.com Bill Byers' Hunter Club est. 1953

CraZyMatt wrote:Well, I guess I'll see y'all on the internet.
User avatar
ByersFarm
DHC Sponsor
 
Posts: 11219
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:03 am
Location: Hunter, AR


Return to Field Duck Hunting

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest