@ BDD2

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@ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:32 am

Aside from hunting, my main hobby is playing with antique tractors. The guy who wrote this isn't anybody famous (as far as I know) but I found it to be kind of poetic and thought you might like to read it. It may not hold the same meaning to someone that isn't into antique irons but I thought it was pretty cool.

http://forums.yesterdaystractors.com/vi ... cbcfb12bad
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby blackduckdog2 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 1:54 pm

Dang, Cd, you're totally speaking my language here! When I worked on my brother-in-law's farm back in the seventies, they were all really well equipped with shiny new JDs and IHs.....complete with air conditioned cabs and eight track players (although the dust in Moses Lake, Washington got into everything and destroyed my Deep Purple Machine Head tape :mad: ).
But my favorite was the old 1955 Ford 850 (I think 850, anyway) that still ran because the family just plain loved the old thing like you would an old herding dog. I wonder if it's still out there
And anyone who can describe old machinery using the Dead Sea Scrolls is a poet of the first order in my book! :thumbsup: (Gary Snyder, one of my all time favorite poets, insisted that the ancient propane refrigerator he was always tinkering with had a soul, and I know for a fact that the old Italian espresso machine I rebuilt did!
I don't think Spinner will mind if I quote a message I sent him ages ago about a "machine" I rebuilt:
I had this thing given to me when I lived in Boston 30 years ago by an old guy up in the Italian North End. It had sat in a corner unused for God knows how long until I asked the old guy about it one day, and he just said "You want? Take, take!!" So I took. It was an ancient Termozona from the old country that probably would have blown up like a Mississippi steamer with the valves tied down had I tried to fire it up. Converted to take household 110 but you'd have been a fool to try it. Anyway I spent over ten years restoring this baby and it was a labor of love so complete my wife (Who actually was the first to get curious about it) even got a little jealous. We moved around a lot in those days, so the "Bronze Beast" as she called it even though it was copper, would go into storage for awhile, over to a friends or my folks' place, and sometimes I'd get to keep it on the kitchen table for weeks, tracking down parts, modifying them when inevitably they were the wrong thread pitch or whatever, replacing the heating elements....and the POLISHING! Well you get the idea. Now it sits proudly on a table I built especially for it and I love the enormous fiddlefuck factor that goes into every shot I pull from it's gorgeous, gleaming monstrosity :clapping:
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby Glimmerjim » Wed Aug 21, 2013 2:43 pm

blackduckdog2 wrote:Dang, Cd, you're totally speaking my language here! When I worked on my brother-in-law's farm back in the seventies, they were all really well equipped with shiny new JDs and IHs.....complete with air conditioned cabs and eight track players (although the dust in Moses Lake, Washington got into everything and destroyed my Deep Purple Machine Head tape :mad: ).
But my favorite was the old 1955 Ford 850 (I think 850, anyway) that still ran because the family just plain loved the old thing like you would an old herding dog. I wonder if it's still out there
And anyone who can describe old machinery using the Dead Sea Scrolls is a poet of the first order in my book! :thumbsup: (Gary Snyder, one of my all time favorite poets, insisted that the ancient propane refrigerator he was always tinkering with had a soul, and I know for a fact that the old Italian espresso machine I rebuilt did!
I don't think Spinner will mind if I quote a message I sent him ages ago about a "machine" I rebuilt:
I had this thing given to me when I lived in Boston 30 years ago by an old guy up in the Italian North End. It had sat in a corner unused for God knows how long until I asked the old guy about it one day, and he just said "You want? Take, take!!" So I took. It was an ancient Termozona from the old country that probably would have blown up like a Mississippi steamer with the valves tied down had I tried to fire it up. Converted to take household 110 but you'd have been a fool to try it. Anyway I spent over ten years restoring this baby and it was a labor of love so complete my wife (Who actually was the first to get curious about it) even got a little jealous. We moved around a lot in those days, so the "Bronze Beast" as she called it even though it was copper, would go into storage for awhile, over to a friends or my folks' place, and sometimes I'd get to keep it on the kitchen table for weeks, tracking down parts, modifying them when inevitably they were the wrong thread pitch or whatever, replacing the heating elements....and the POLISHING! Well you get the idea. Now it sits proudly on a table I built especially for it and I love the enormous fiddlefuck factor that goes into every shot I pull from it's gorgeous, gleaming monstrosity :clapping:

Everything has a soul.
"Shinto: The word Shinto means “the way of the kami.” This stems from two Chinese words: shen meaning “divine being” and tao meaning “way.” The word kami refers primarily to the various gods or deities worshipped in this religion. However, it also relates to the sacred essence abiding in both animate and inanimate objects (such as oceans, mountains, waterfalls, trees, plants and animals)."
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby Andy W » Wed Aug 21, 2013 2:47 pm

We need a picture of that BDD2.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Wed Aug 21, 2013 3:19 pm

Andy W wrote:We need a picture of that BDD2.


Agreed! You just gotta love the beauty of old tyme craftsmanship and quality, even in its simplest form.

Here's a quick video of me pulling my '48 John Deere model A at the local FFA fund raiser. It's mostly stock so I'm never in the running with the real pulling tractors but I just love to hear that old 321 cubic inch 2 cylinder banging its way down the track.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bHEQyCrF0M
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby assateague » Wed Aug 21, 2013 3:39 pm

Glimmerjim wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:Dang, Cd, you're totally speaking my language here! When I worked on my brother-in-law's farm back in the seventies, they were all really well equipped with shiny new JDs and IHs.....complete with air conditioned cabs and eight track players (although the dust in Moses Lake, Washington got into everything and destroyed my Deep Purple Machine Head tape :mad: ).
But my favorite was the old 1955 Ford 850 (I think 850, anyway) that still ran because the family just plain loved the old thing like you would an old herding dog. I wonder if it's still out there
And anyone who can describe old machinery using the Dead Sea Scrolls is a poet of the first order in my book! :thumbsup: (Gary Snyder, one of my all time favorite poets, insisted that the ancient propane refrigerator he was always tinkering with had a soul, and I know for a fact that the old Italian espresso machine I rebuilt did!
I don't think Spinner will mind if I quote a message I sent him ages ago about a "machine" I rebuilt:
I had this thing given to me when I lived in Boston 30 years ago by an old guy up in the Italian North End. It had sat in a corner unused for God knows how long until I asked the old guy about it one day, and he just said "You want? Take, take!!" So I took. It was an ancient Termozona from the old country that probably would have blown up like a Mississippi steamer with the valves tied down had I tried to fire it up. Converted to take household 110 but you'd have been a fool to try it. Anyway I spent over ten years restoring this baby and it was a labor of love so complete my wife (Who actually was the first to get curious about it) even got a little jealous. We moved around a lot in those days, so the "Bronze Beast" as she called it even though it was copper, would go into storage for awhile, over to a friends or my folks' place, and sometimes I'd get to keep it on the kitchen table for weeks, tracking down parts, modifying them when inevitably they were the wrong thread pitch or whatever, replacing the heating elements....and the POLISHING! Well you get the idea. Now it sits proudly on a table I built especially for it and I love the enormous fiddlefuck factor that goes into every shot I pull from it's gorgeous, gleaming monstrosity :clapping:

Everything has a soul.
"Shinto: The word Shinto means “the way of the kami.” This stems from two Chinese words: shen meaning “divine being” and tao meaning “way.” The word kami refers primarily to the various gods or deities worshipped in this religion. However, it also relates to the sacred essence abiding in both animate and inanimate objects (such as oceans, mountains, waterfalls, trees, plants and animals)."


The best translation of it is probably just "holy". But I get your point. The study and etymology of Chinese characters was probably one of my favorite things.
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Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Let a man vote to give himself a fish and he eats until society collapses.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby boney fingers » Wed Aug 21, 2013 5:10 pm

The first tractor I learned to drive was a narrow front end M. My most vivid memories are my knuckles getting smashed every time you hit a ground hog hole. I love old tractors, but I love air ride seats, power steering, and air conditioned cabs even better. You might be surprised to know how many of those old relics are still out there working.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:41 pm

boney fingers wrote:The first tractor I learned to drive was a narrow front end M. My most vivid memories are my knuckles getting smashed every time you hit a ground hog hole. I love old tractors, but I love air ride seats, power steering, and air conditioned cabs even better. You might be surprised to know how many of those old relics are still out there working.


The M is a damn good looking tractor. My uncle pulls a really nice one. Those four cylinder engines are really smooth running compared to my two bangers........but they sure do sound funny. :lol3:
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby boney fingers » Wed Aug 21, 2013 8:34 pm

clampdaddy wrote:
boney fingers wrote:The first tractor I learned to drive was a narrow front end M. My most vivid memories are my knuckles getting smashed every time you hit a ground hog hole. I love old tractors, but I love air ride seats, power steering, and air conditioned cabs even better. You might be surprised to know how many of those old relics are still out there working.


The M is a damn good looking tractor. My uncle pulls a really nice one. Those four cylinder engines are really smooth running compared to my two bangers........but they sure do sound funny. :lol3:


Definitely a lot of romance associated with the sound of the "poppers", still know a few guys who actually farm with them. My all time favorite antique is the Ford hundred series, especially the 700 and 900 series. If I ever want a restoration project that would be my pick. Also my father was a steam fan so as a kid we always hit the steam shows; the evolution of farm machinery is fascinating to me.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Wed Aug 21, 2013 9:57 pm

boney fingers wrote: Definitely a lot of romance associated with the sound of the "poppers", still know a few guys who actually farm with them. My all time favorite antique is the Ford hundred series, especially the 700 and 900 series. If I ever want a restoration project that would be my pick. Also my father was a steam fan so as a kid we always hit the steam shows; the evolution of farm machinery is fascinating to me.


Steam power is impressive. The big antique tractor show in Tulare, California draws in some of the old monsters. Two years ago, as an exhibition pull, they hooked an old steam powered Holt to the sled and they could not stop that tractor. Weight box at the top, brakes locked up, and she kept on chugging down the track.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby blackduckdog2 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 10:24 pm

clampdaddy wrote:
boney fingers wrote: Definitely a lot of romance associated with the sound of the "poppers", still know a few guys who actually farm with them. My all time favorite antique is the Ford hundred series, especially the 700 and 900 series. If I ever want a restoration project that would be my pick. Also my father was a steam fan so as a kid we always hit the steam shows; the evolution of farm machinery is fascinating to me.


Steam power is impressive. The big antique tractor show in Tulare, California draws in some of the old monsters. Two years ago, as an exhibition pull, they hooked an old steam powered Holt to the sled and they could not stop that tractor. Weight box at the top, brakes locked up, and she kept on chugging down the track.

I had this wild plan to build a steam powered Mojo because I thought I'd found a loophole in the WA state regs. And I woulda done it, too, if only I could figure out a way to quiet the damned thing down :lol3:
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby Glimmerjim » Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:35 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:
clampdaddy wrote:
boney fingers wrote: Definitely a lot of romance associated with the sound of the "poppers", still know a few guys who actually farm with them. My all time favorite antique is the Ford hundred series, especially the 700 and 900 series. If I ever want a restoration project that would be my pick. Also my father was a steam fan so as a kid we always hit the steam shows; the evolution of farm machinery is fascinating to me.


Steam power is impressive. The big antique tractor show in Tulare, California draws in some of the old monsters. Two years ago, as an exhibition pull, they hooked an old steam powered Holt to the sled and they could not stop that tractor. Weight box at the top, brakes locked up, and she kept on chugging down the track.

I had this wild plan to build a steam powered Mojo because I thought I'd found a loophole in the WA state regs. And I woulda done it, too, if only I could figure out a way to quiet the damned thing down :lol3:

There are plans on You Tube on how to build a hand operated one, much like a jerk string (which, coincidentally, they always called my family tree). They're really pretty simple. The only addition I need to make to mine is a foot pedal.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby boney fingers » Thu Aug 22, 2013 5:39 am

I always wanted to build a mojo with compressed air using a scuba tank. I have a hand operated one, but they are a bit of a pain.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Thu Aug 22, 2013 7:57 am

blackduckdog2 wrote:I had this wild plan to build a steam powered Mojo because I thought I'd found a loophole in the WA state regs. And I woulda done it, too, if only I could figure out a way to quiet the damned thing down :lol3:


If it had a stationary exhaust you could plumb it to exit underwater. It would muffle and mask the noise with the added benefit of adding ripples in the water. Toss a duck butt in the middle of the bubbles and you got two motion decoys for the price of one. But if you were thinking of using the ancient spinning motor design that wouldn't work without some more work.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby 3200 man » Thu Aug 22, 2013 2:03 pm

Clamp

To bad I didn't know that you liked Old Iron horses . I sold a Poppin Johnny ( Complete) to ART Bright 3 years ago , along
with a drag disc . It was a O series and he had to show me , where the O was ! He got it running and it's in the barn , with
3 others he has . Do you know Charlie Parrish or Gary Rinero ?
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby blackduckdog2 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 1:10 am

clampdaddy wrote:
blackduckdog2 wrote:I had this wild plan to build a steam powered Mojo because I thought I'd found a loophole in the WA state regs. And I woulda done it, too, if only I could figure out a way to quiet the damned thing down :lol3:


If it had a stationary exhaust you could plumb it to exit underwater. It would muffle and mask the noise with the added benefit of adding ripples in the water. Toss a duck butt in the middle of the bubbles and you got two motion decoys for the price of one. But if you were thinking of using the ancient spinning motor design that wouldn't work without some more work.

I was thinking of something like this:
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
Walt Kelly, via Slow's avatar. Look it up
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Fri Aug 23, 2013 6:59 am

3200 man wrote:Clamp

To bad I didn't know that you liked Old Iron horses . I sold a Poppin Johnny ( Complete) to ART Bright 3 years ago , along
with a drag disc . It was a O series and he had to show me , where the O was ! He got it running and it's in the barn , with
3 others he has . Do you know Charlie Parrish or Gary Rinero ?


Story of my life Larry. :lol3: I couldn't tell you how many times I've heard " To bad I didn't know you were in to those old things, I just gave one away". I don't know those guys.
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby blackduckdog2 » Sat Aug 24, 2013 4:49 pm

Check it out....Tractor Poem!

POWER ON THE LAND

I should hate them:
Raucous, oil-burning beasts
That condemned my quiet, beloved horses
To exile and extinction.
Yet my heart warms
To these homely stalwarts, still game
To plough and till the stubborn clay
Three generations on.
So simple I could drive one
In my sleep (and often did)
But with enduring rightness
Wrought in each casting and component
And the motive power of twenty teams
Compressed into a one-ton slab of steel.
After sixty years and more
They turn the earth
Beneath their wheels
And hand a man like me
The means to shape the world.


..........by some english guy in sussex (I don't know his name)
"We have met the enemy, and he is us."
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby clampdaddy » Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:37 pm

I like it. :thumbsup: I grew up on a farm and like any little boy I thought they were really neat. Eventually that faded and they were just a tool. No more interesting than a rusty hammer in a tool chest drawer. When I moved to town something reignited my interest in tractors. Probably the fact that now I can ride them around because I want to and not because I have to. :lol3:
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby Glimmerjim » Sun Aug 25, 2013 2:50 am

clampdaddy wrote:I like it. :thumbsup: I grew up on a farm and like any little boy I thought they were really neat. Eventually that faded and they were just a tool. No more interesting than a rusty hammer in a tool chest drawer. When I moved to town something reignited my interest in tractors. Probably the fact that now I can ride them around because I want to and not because I have to. :lol3:

If you have a flat on a tractor do you have to shoot it?
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Re: @ BDD2

Postby 3200 man » Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:54 am

My Old Ford 4400 D still has Balls and it sounds like an OLD TIME Tractor but , I think the Moline could pull more ?
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