Impoundment

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Re: Impoundment

Postby sdduckman » Wed Sep 18, 2013 9:18 am

bigsprig wrote:Ducks like bugs at time more than corn. Flooded impoundments with openings, moist soil, etc grow the best bugs. Corn is great, but you can do well with some food and some "sheet water" as mentioned above. Not glamerous to think about our wonderful ducks eating bugz, but that is a fact. Also note if you have millet and your water is too deep there is a chance the swans will get into your impoundment and pull it all up (been there) Congratulations on being able to have impoundments, Good luck.


I am not an authority but I do know that some ducks prefer or only eat aquatic weeds or grasses. Gadwall and Widgeonare two. I have hunted on a corn only impoundment and we almost never shot gadwall or Widgeon just ringers, woodies, and mallards. So if you will have multiple pools you may wish to consider keeping one flooded year round or in a moist soil state for more variety. If you could foster the growth of Widgeon weed you would have something.
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Re: Impoundment

Postby KAhunter » Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:10 pm

sdduckman wrote:
bigsprig wrote:Ducks like bugs at time more than corn. Flooded impoundments with openings, moist soil, etc grow the best bugs. Corn is great, but you can do well with some food and some "sheet water" as mentioned above. Not glamerous to think about our wonderful ducks eating bugz, but that is a fact. Also note if you have millet and your water is too deep there is a chance the swans will get into your impoundment and pull it all up (been there) Congratulations on being able to have impoundments, Good luck.


I am not an authority but I do know that some ducks prefer or only eat aquatic weeds or grasses. Gadwall and Widgeonare two. I have hunted on a corn only impoundment and we almost never shot gadwall or Widgeon just ringers, woodies, and mallards. So if you will have multiple pools you may wish to consider keeping one flooded year round or in a moist soil state for more variety. If you could foster the growth of Widgeon weed you would have something.

Plenty of gadwall and widgeon killed on corn only impoundments. Just depends on whether widgeon or gadwall in your area. All ducks eat inverts to some degree. Inverts are trageted usually in late winter early spring mostly by females to help with egg prodution. Ducklings rely on inverts as well to survive. Drakes will eat them as well at times.
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Its always duck season, there is just a long break from february to september.
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Re: Impoundment

Postby NCfowl » Wed Sep 18, 2013 3:59 pm

In response, where there are hens, there are drakes searching for the right spouse :thumbsup: :grooving:
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Re: Impoundment

Postby sdduckman » Thu Sep 19, 2013 9:39 am

I stated I was no authority, however below are two excerpts from The Cornell Labs All About Birds.

"The America Wigeon is the dabbling duck most likely to leave water and graze on vegetation in fields. However, feeding in fields on grain, such as corn, is rather rare."

Food: Aquatic plants; some insects and mollusks during the breeding season.

Again, I,am not trying to be an expert. I have scouted and hunted these birds for 41 years. That being said I have shot a few Widgeon and gadwall over corn however they were few. I guess they could have been flocking behavior or looking for rest and refuge or as the excerpt says rarely feeding in fields for corn. So if I were so privileged as to have an impoundment in coastal NC I would probably manage it for aquatic vegetation or try to have a broader variety of food than corn. Another thing is unless you manupliate the corn which might be a no no you would have to keep the water level pretty high for ducks to reach the ears.

I know I did not address the diet of gadwall but I am technogolically challegened and copying and pasting and searching at the same time on this I Pad is difficult for me.

Good luck to you in your endeavor. Whatever you you should have a great place to hunt in an area where there can be a lot of birds.

Steve
"There are only two true sports, hunting and fishing, anything else is just a game."
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