Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

A forum to discuss taxidermy techniques and mounts.

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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby Pete-pec » Sun Dec 16, 2012 11:59 am

Never use paper, so no idea of print? Paper wicks away moisture. I would never wrap in paper. Just plastic.
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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby phishbum » Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:50 pm

Pete - I was actually talking about the bags newspapers come in. Have heard folks mention using them, but just curious about ink.
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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby Pete-pec » Tue Dec 18, 2012 3:00 pm

Never used them, but wouldn't worry about ink.
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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby Glimmerjim » Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:57 pm

phishbum wrote:When using newspaper bags, has anyone ever experienced residual ink rubbing off onto feathers?

Yeah, it kinda sucks. I've got a beautiful greenhound mount with a damn Doonesbury cartoon on its breast! :lol3:
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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby Adrenal-Line » Thu Jun 19, 2014 10:49 am

Mr. Taxidermist wrote:The question of how to care for birds that are going to be mounted is asked quite often, so, I have decided to post a thread (as a sticky) that can be used for future reference.

Now on to the field care...
If the bird is still alive, the best way to dispatch it that I have found is to open the bird's mouth and stick a small pocket knife through the roof of the mouth into the duck's brain. This causes instant death and I feel is much better than drowning or squeezing a bird as some other recommend. Just make sure that you don't get rough and stick the blade through the top of the head. DO NOT wring the bird's neck..



I found this post very insightful! Especially the part I quoted above, I would like to hear your feedback on my device I invented which is this same concept you were mentioning but you do not need to open the birds mouth as you go into the back part of the birds head where the neck and base of skull meet and it puts a small #2 size BB hole in the back of the head, here is a picture of my device and video link of me using it this past duck season, I would like to get your opinion on it! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4XtcSgFzyQ
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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby The Waterfowler » Thu Jun 19, 2014 9:02 pm

The less holes in the head the better.
Helping waterfowl make bad decisions since 1961.






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Re: Field Care of Birds for Taxidermy

Postby Pete-pec » Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:50 am

I understand you are a sponsor, but you asked for an honest opinion. I was on your fb page just recently, and saw where you had comments like "here is another bird mounted that was dispatched with our device". I thought to myself at that time, (as a taxidermist), who would recommend a hole in a bird's head who also wanted the bird mounted? The head for me, is the last place I want another hole. Please understand that some people use the original head, and therefore do not separate the skull from the face. These guys make a relief cut that must be sewn up anyway, so your device may have very little impact on their method. However, the overwhelming majority of taxidermists use an artificial head, and must sew up those random pellet holes to hide those imperfections that a poorly sewn hole can often show. Do we have head shot birds? Of course, do we prefer them? Absolutely not. So like the waterfowler said, less holes is better.

I think your selling point to your key chain trinket should be geared more towards the meat hunter than the taxidermist. I have never tried your device, so please understand that I'm only giving you my opinion. I just cannot see a time I would use this tool instead of my current method which is compressing its chest with my knee. I would never be so brave or reckless to try that tool on a turkey.

I wish you the best of luck.
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