Venison ?

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Venison ?

Postby RightWing » Sat Nov 24, 2007 10:11 am

I ate the tenderloins from a small buck yesterday while they were still warm.....fried with garlic, onions, and red wine until medium....absolutely delicious but almost too tough to chew.....my buddy says it's because I needed to let them rest awhile before cooking......I tend to believe him because I did the same a few years ago but had waited a day before eating them and they were as tender as filet mignon.....is he right?.....and if so how long should it "rest" before eating?
Kill totals 08-09: 1 bird(I think it was a mallard)
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Postby Kiskadinna » Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:06 pm

Based on what you've said, it was a deer shot the same dayand the tenderloins immediately removed?
My understanding is that all venison benefits from aging because the connective tissue or collagen is broken down by natural enzymes. I don't know if rigor mortis plays an affect here since it MAY not have set in, but that also lasts in the muscles for up to 24 hours.
in reading up on this a bit, I found that the 1-2 days i typically have aged my deer is less than optimum for tenderness as a week in the right temperature is better.
So basically, as you suspect, aging of the venison is better for it, and I would suspect that even after having cut the loins out, you could "age" them in the fridge over night and have a more tender product.
-Erik
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Postby thaner » Sat Nov 24, 2007 5:46 pm

Aging is a good thing for older deer for sure, but for younger farm land deer it is not necessary, but doesn’t hurt as long as you keep the meat at a safe temp. Usually the time it takes to get it processed while kept in the cool air or in a fridge if it is warm out is plenty sufficient for young deer. I routinely shoot 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 year olds, skin, quarter, and pack them into the fridge within hours in early bow season. I usually wait about 12 hours before I start cutting and packaging. I then usually finish them within about 24 hr. At that point I put them in the freezer and they are great. If I get a big buck or old doe I quarter and pack them into the fridge and let them set for three or four days. Rigor mortis is the probably the main culprit if your young buck was tough. You need the let the rigger come out before you freeze or eat it. I don’t think cutting is a problem, but I know cooking it while the muscle is in rigor will result in tough meat. If I recall rigor is kind of like a muscle cramp or tightly packed muscle condition. It may also have a chemical component, but I can’t remember. I have also heard that if you freeze the meat before the rigor comes out you can get the same result.
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Postby RightWing » Sat Nov 24, 2007 7:18 pm

Thanks for the input.....I had heard of the enzymatic breakdown idea before but........ I will definitely let it hang for a day or 2 before eating the fresh meat next time.....Dan
Kill totals 08-09: 1 bird(I think it was a mallard)
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Postby herblorentz78 » Tue Nov 27, 2007 6:22 pm

I shot my deer opening day (nov. 15th) We process all of our deer next weekend (dec. 1st) so far the last deer shot was yesterday. I am a firm believer in aging venison at least one week. We shoot older deer 3 1/2 and older generally, never tough and if you age them it takes alot of the rut taste out of the bigger deer. My sister and her husband live in lower michigan and shoot mainly cornfield raised 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 year olds and process and freeze immediatley and they have a much stronger taste and never seem as tender.
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