Has this ever happened to you?

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Has this ever happened to you?

Postby CVDuckHunter » Mon May 02, 2016 10:16 pm

So my brain was operating abnormal today, which is normal, and I was wondering....Has anyone hunted on public land and their dog ran off and you couldn't find it? Or have you known of anyone losing their dog out there? Or heard a story?
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Tue May 03, 2016 5:40 am

Dogs sometimes get lost, but a dog that might run off shouldn't be out there in the first place.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby HNTFSH » Tue May 03, 2016 5:41 am

Had several ask if I'd seen their Beagles. A couple looking for the big wheeling Pointers. Don't recall any Retrievers.

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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby HNTFSH » Tue May 03, 2016 5:50 am

Rick Hall wrote:Dogs sometimes get lost, but a dog that might run off shouldn't be out there in the first place.


The most panicked one I've seen was the guy with the big Griffon whose pride and joy decided to "take off" at the Pheasant farm on a Saturday morning. It visited all five fields with hunters and their dogs just blackening the sky with $20.00 per bird birds.

To top it off, the guy had a deafening yell which his dog apparently couldn't hear but we could.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby crackerd » Tue May 03, 2016 6:30 am

HNTFSH wrote:
Rick Hall wrote:Dogs sometimes get lost, but a dog that might run off shouldn't be out there in the first place.


The most panicked one I've seen was the guy with the big Griffon whose pride and joy decided to "take off" at the Pheasant farm on a Saturday morning. It visited all five fields with hunters and their dogs just blackening the sky with $20.00 per bird birds.

To top it off, the guy had a deafening yell which his dog apparently couldn't hear but we could.


So y'all were on an outing with the pheasant pursuing equivalent of good ol' Fenton (Phenton)? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GRSbr0EYYU

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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Shurshot » Tue May 03, 2016 6:44 am

Had a guys CLF "get lost" in an down east swamp this past season. Was her first time hunting this area and got out of sight while looking for a bird. She showed up at some guys house about three days later, a mile or so from where she ran off. Was a fairly young, inexperienced dog that probably shouldn't have been in the blind in the first place.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby HNTFSH » Tue May 03, 2016 6:50 am

crackerd wrote:
HNTFSH wrote:
Rick Hall wrote:Dogs sometimes get lost, but a dog that might run off shouldn't be out there in the first place.


The most panicked one I've seen was the guy with the big Griffon whose pride and joy decided to "take off" at the Pheasant farm on a Saturday morning. It visited all five fields with hunters and their dogs just blackening the sky with $20.00 per bird birds.

To top it off, the guy had a deafening yell which his dog apparently couldn't hear but we could.


So y'all were on an outing with the pheasant pursuing equivalent of good ol' Fenton (Phenton)? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GRSbr0EYYU

MG


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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby ohio mike » Tue May 03, 2016 7:05 am

HNTFSH wrote:Had several ask if I'd seen their Beagles. A couple looking for the big wheeling Pointers. Don't recall any Retrievers.

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Ahh Beagles,different then any other pooch discussed here.Deer are the main culprit with wayward Beagles. (Unless said scent is electrifying!) Back in the pre deer days it was fox.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby HNTFSH » Tue May 03, 2016 7:43 am

ohio mike wrote:
HNTFSH wrote:Had several ask if I'd seen their Beagles. A couple looking for the big wheeling Pointers. Don't recall any Retrievers.

Tweet-Tweet-Tweet is the word of God.


Ahh Beagles,different then any other pooch discussed here.Deer are the main culprit with wayward Beagles. (Unless said scent is electrifying!) Back in the pre deer days it was fox.


Beagles are a trip. Never had or trained one (or three). The one guy that stands out in my mind was a few years ago as he was really worried. His "Champion" Beagle was lost so I assumed he was a Trialer. Didn't bother him with Champion-of-where-or-what but I suspect it would be worse than losing "Dudley" the 1/2 whit Beagle.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Tue May 03, 2016 8:55 am

That reliable recall stuff seems pretty important.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby California Sprig » Tue May 03, 2016 4:57 pm

Out of curiosity why are you asking this question?
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Dep6 » Tue May 03, 2016 5:10 pm

I remember we headed to my grandfather's place one Saturday to go rabbit hunting, cousin had a pack of beagles. Well we didn't get much hunting done that day, out of like 15 dogs turned out, we got back 1 that day and like maybe 2 more a week or so later. My grandfather never let him set foot on the place again. I remember Pop laughing his tail off about it.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby James Seibel » Wed May 04, 2016 5:47 am

Between 1970-1983 I do not recall to many dogs lost ,in fact I do not think I lost any dogs but when I went in business for my self in 1983 I was working a high volume of Pointer and Setters in the woods . I can think back to some of the worst run off.
I was looking for one dog and ran across a bow hunter . I asked him if he heard a dog running with a bell ? I said I don't care about the dog all I want is my prized Bell Back ! The bell was from one of my Grouse dogs I hunted. ( of course i was just joking ,sorta joking ) I got the dog back took that bell off the training collar and replaced it with another bell.
I just looked after I wrote this post at the bell , it still sits next to a big framed picture of that old Grouse dog I used to hunt . Sure brings back some great memories !

No tracking collars - no beeper collars - no nothing except bells and it was easy to lose some dogs in the woods because they would chase deer and I am sure of it . Sure I took time to teach dogs to handle and come to a whistle ect... but still in those days there were lots of deer to chase by a dog . In that terrain i worked dogs the dog could get on the other side of a hill and would be difficult or impossible to even hear a bell .

I got ALL and Every Dog back sooner or later but those days I would lose a dog more than a 20 min were not fun . Never fun to lose a dog. Especially not mine . I do not miss those days i spent hours looking for run off pointer or setter .

Today if I work any pointing dogs and for most part I only work retrievers but I put GPS tracking collar on even close working dogs that would never think of running off .

About 4 years ago I had a GPS come back here for some work . Dog was worked by me before , It knew me well , the dog listened good, hunted good and was not a big running crazy dog . I turned dog lose on my grounds she went down into the woods and went out of bell range . I whistled few times and nothing . I had tracking collar on her but not a GPS . Started to track her and thought she went back to house . Nope - went on pass . I continued to track and finally found her mile from house . Lucky I got her back alive is all I can say. The highways today with amount of traffic and people was not this way in 70 and 80 .

No doubt that dog ran a deer or fox or coyote , who knows but it was probably a deer chase
Reason I now own a GPS tracking collar and why I use them . I do put high value on client dogs .

But years ago in 80's I had one of my Grouse dogs take off . It left me and went over into another section of woods and kept hunting. Some people stopped because i was walking the road and told me they heard a bell back over there 1/2 a mile . I found the dog on point . That Was the only time I was lost from her any length of time. In those days I had no tracking collars and not sure the beeper collar even came out by then. That GPS I owned , I petty much just hunted with her . She found the birds and knew where they were . She did not hunt real wide but she would keep pretty good track of me but in 14 years of hunting her 6 days a week it kept me on my toes where the heck she was . When i said not to wide a hunting dog , does not mean she was even in bell range at times . When a dog would get on point and stay there and no beeper collar it could take a bit of time to find a dog in the heavy cover heck even with a beeper collar on a dog .
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Wed May 04, 2016 7:32 am

James, among my treasured keepsakes there's an antique goat bell my mother gave me for my second grouse dog, a big wheeled setter that made smaller bells useless. Never lost him, except on point, in large part because even then, circa '70s, there were more deer than grouse in SE Ohio and WVa, and we made of point of breaking the pups off them early on. Not being much of a traditionalist, I was a pretty easy convert to beepers (http://www.gundogmag.com/training/training_bells_beepers/ perhaps their not paying me for republication after only buying first serial rights explains the dropped by-line...), but I hung onto that bell for the priceless memories it conjures.

Can, however, tell of a friend's young Brittany that took off after a deer and was soon beyond the audible range of its beeper that gave us both some anxious hours and a good laugh. Our search ended with a call from home saying some other hunters had found the pup and called the number on its collar ID. They were still in the our area, and there was a happy reunion highlighted when my friend sheepishly allowed that he was most grateful to have his dog back, but where was its collar?

"That damn thing!" was the response as our benefactor opened his truck bed tool box and produced a rolled up set of coverall "insulators" with the beeper still chirping away within. "Couldn't figure out how to shut the damn thing up."
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Wed May 04, 2016 8:41 am

California Sprig wrote:Out of curiosity why are you asking this question?


While I've been trying to stress the importance of prevention, I'm guessing there's an element of "What do I do if it happens?" in his question, which hasn't been addressed.

The only "run off," as opposed to "lost," retrievers I can remember seeing were frightened away from their owners by gunfire they'd not been conditioned for. Usually cases of first hunt pups that had been accustomed to single shots or multiple shots spaced as if testing or trialing but weren't prepared for a nearly simultaneous volley from multiple guns in close quarters. And those dogs usually took off for the safety of Pop's truck and might still be underneath it when Pop got there.

The hopefully more common "lost" retriever tends to do just the opposite: be drawn to gunfire and turn up where someone is shooting. So, assuming a lost dog is thoroughly gun conditioned and will recall reliably but isn't responding to voice or whistle, gun shots are its owner's best bet for drawing it from beyond the whistle's reach.

That failing, a great many pointing dog owners have reported leaving the dog's crate or an article of their own clothing in the spot where the dog was lost and later finding the dog returned to it. I've no personal experience with that ploy, but it does underscore the point that many "lost" dogs really aren't so much so and eventually return to where they left their men. And that is something I have a good deal of experience with, as I've been frightened witless by "lost" retrievers that eventually turned up with birds that apparently led them on epic searches. I may not have known where they were, but they did.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby RustyGunz1960 » Wed May 04, 2016 9:19 am

My father-in-law raised and hunted beagles and had this happen several times over the years. Just part of the game with hounds. He used the old trick of leaving a coat with his own scent behind and came back the next morning to find the dog curled up on it each time it happened. I don't know if this works better with hounds than with retrievers but it's worth a shot if you are forced to leave without finding the dog.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby CVDuckHunter » Thu May 05, 2016 2:55 pm

California Sprig wrote:Out of curiosity why are you asking this question?

Just plain curiosity.
Sitting out in the backyard thinking about times when I was young and guys' dogs would be running around with the guy yelling at the top of this lungs. A guy even shot his dog once.
So then I began to think if anyone has actually lost a dog, from it just running off or getting lost on a retrieve.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby HNTFSH » Thu May 05, 2016 3:46 pm

CVDuckHunter wrote:
California Sprig wrote:Out of curiosity why are you asking this question?

Just plain curiosity.
Sitting out in the backyard thinking about times when I was young and guys' dogs would be running around with the guy yelling at the top of this lungs. A guy even shot his dog once.
So then I began to think if anyone has actually lost a dog, from it just running off or getting lost on a retrieve.


There are thousands of untrained dogs and untrained owners out there.
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Postby Tim Terrell » Sun May 08, 2016 9:33 pm

Never happened to me... Thank God. I did have a springer go missing for a half-hour or so, but she came back from chasing a deer I expect. I was nearly ready to lay my grouse-hunting vest on the ground for her to find and give-up. They say if you leave your vest or a piece of clothing on the ground, the dog will find it and stay there for you to find them. Anyway, very scary.

Reminded me of a story though.
I was hunting in lake Charles, LA with a vet-friend of the Haydels' some years ago. We get to the launch-ramp/boat house that first morning, and a local fellow steps up to our party; looks to Dr. John and says he lost his dog out there about 3 days ago. He had looked everywhere... even rented a helicopter to search for him. He asked us to keep an eye-out... if we'd happen to find a black lab wandering out there. John said he'd be sure to keep an eye-out for him... and wished him good luck finding his dog.

After the guy walked away, John turned to me and said "Gators likely got that dog by now. They may move slower in winter, but they will finally corner that dog and get him." I think my mouth fell open in horror. Much as I loved hunting down there... the idea of putting my dog down in the same water frequented by big gators? Nah.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Mon May 09, 2016 5:08 am

Tim, I like John as well as you do and have great faith in his veterinary advice, but he's from the Yankee end of the state and missed that diagnosis - at least for the time of year you were at Haydel's camp. When the water temperatures hit the low 60s, the cold blooded alligator's metabolism slows below hunger. Might see him out sunning on a nice Winter day, but as long as the water's cold, Pup would have to step on an alligator to get snapped, much less eaten. More likely be coyotes that took advantage of a lost dog that didn't live off the land well enough to keep its strength up.

Which to my thinking has always been a much more frightening prospect. Would rather one of mine be drowned than ripped apart. God forbid.

(Been counting on that info from Texas Parks and Wildlife since the mid '80s, and I still get a queasy little whistling in the dark feeling every time I type the cold-blooded metabolism stuff.)
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Posted Land Nocturnal bandit » Mon May 09, 2016 5:25 am

We also run coonhounds at night. lost a few, one for over a week. Battery on her tacking collar went dead. She came into a house and gentleman called me. I now run the garmin gps trackers. All the houndsman this way run them on bear and coon hounds. Would not turn a dog loose without one now. Alot of jerks out there also that want to shoot any dog for running deer just because they are in woods. I was also on a coonhound nite hunt ( competition ) had a guys dog shot by land owner.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Cupped-n-Committed » Mon May 09, 2016 9:36 am

When I was a kid deer where a lot less and we rabbit hunted all the time. Now, frickin' bow hunters cry bloody murder to farmer if we left hounds loose on rabbits, but that is another soap box thread. :yes:

We used to loose a beagle once in a while. Had a dog that split off and run away from the pack once in a while. When finished hunting and we couldn't find one, my Uncle would take his jacket off an lay it in the field near where the truck was. Next morning he's send me or one of his boys up there at first light and that beagle was sleeping on his coat every time.

We got two new pups and being a novice trainer I tried letting one adult out with the two pups so they could learn on following the older dog. I started them out hunting and everything was fine for 10 minutes and then the older dog went north and one pup east and one west. :no: Chased down the dog that went west and secure it at the truck. Went for the east dog, but lost it already. Took me 3 hours to find that pup. Then I couldn't find the older dog. Came out at 11PM and heard the older dog still running rabbits, but couldn't get around the Multi-flora rose at night and she wouldn't come to me. Next morning I heard the older dog again and found her. She was still running rabbits 20 hours later from the start and she was bleeding on some of the pads and had to kennel her for almost 3 weeks. Same dog slit her one pad hunting one day needing stitches and wouldn't stop hunting. We found blood where the dogs were and had to leash them all for inspection just to find out it was her.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Mon May 09, 2016 10:35 am

Having felt like I'd spent a lot more time gathering wayward packs and lost individuals than actually rabbit hunting over friends' beagles, I was determined not to have to wrangle my own little hound. Had Chas responding reliably to voice, whistle and hand signals, as well as trash broken and never worried a moment about him being lost, other than when particularly big running swampers made me question his deer proofing. So it can be done, at least with only a single hound to work with.

What's aged me the most is working with old dogs that have lost their hearing. Even in his 15th season my last Brittany would sometimes get farther out than my own pee poor hearing could track his beeper collar, but he was always waiting at the truck when I gave up on hollering, whistling and popping off shots to bring him to me. Perhaps ironically, it was that "always" that eventually made me quit hunting him in good woodcock cover and only turn him out where maintaining good visual contact was possible. That day I'd parked at a gate, instead of driving on to our usual parking - and rendezvous - spot, where I expected to find my wayward friend but didn't. Scared poop out of me thinking of coyotes making a wish with my old friend, and I've seldom been as relieved as when I snapped this reunion shot:
Image

Similarly, the only retriever I've ever actually lost was my current senior dog, Peake. We were speck hunting at the edge of a vast and unfamiliar sea of cattails and cutgrass my 2013-2014 log called "misery marsh" when I sent the coyote for a tipped sailor I plainly shouldn't have, resulting in the following entry:

Dog(s) and Dog Work: Peake went MIA chasing a crip in the tall cattails and whips behind us and was too deaf to hear my whistles and shots above the lunging and plunging required to get through the stuff. Had me scared to death for him for a mighty long time before he was finally spotted well down the pasture edge to our west - and then he still couldn't hear shouts, whistles and shots, making me think we were losing him again. Spooky, spooky time with a dog that had never failed to find his way back to us before.


And Tim's gator concerns above reminded me of a thankfully rare anxious time early last Fall prompted in part by unseasonably warm weather and water:

Dog(s): Peake chased a tipped mottled duck across big open water looking like a topwater chasing a spinner bait and scared pee out of me until the chase entered a huge cattail flat where my fear became his getting lost. Boated on over there and could only listen to him splashing around way back in where I had no chance of getting to him. So I shot don't know how many shells over his area in hopes of guiding the deaf dog in the right direction, and he did eventually come out where he should - carrying a now defunct mottled. Don't know exactly how the duck met its end, but I'd not blame the dog regardless. Heard of a local likely gator lost dog in familiar marsh just yesterday.


And:
Photo Ops: Not much of a photo but so very grateful to have Peake back:
Image


Have heard more than few hunters say they'd not want a dog they couldn't call off wounded game, but I'm not at all keen on one I can't.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Tim Terrell » Mon May 09, 2016 6:35 pm

Rick Hall wrote:Tim, I like John as well as you do and have great faith in his veterinary advice, but he's from the Yankee end of the state and missed that diagnosis - at least for the time of year you were at Haydel's camp. When the water temperatures hit the low 60s, the cold blooded alligator's metabolism slows below hunger. Might see him out sunning on a nice Winter day, but as long as the water's cold, Pup would have to step on an alligator to get snapped, much less eaten. More likely be coyotes that took advantage of a lost dog that didn't live off the land well enough to keep its strength up.

Which to my thinking has always been a much more frightening prospect. Would rather one of mine be drowned than ripped apart. God forbid.

(Been counting on that info from Texas Parks and Wildlife since the mid '80s, and I still get a queasy little whistling in the dark feeling every time I type the cold-blooded metabolism stuff.)

-------------
Well, I thank you for that Rick. For years now I've thought of that poor dog out there in the marsh... with the gators slowly closing in. Brrrr.
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Re: Has this ever happened to you?

Postby Rick Hall » Mon May 09, 2016 6:56 pm

Tim, I suspect most dogs lost in the marsh end up going home with folks whose gunfire drew them, though I've a friend whose lost one finally turned up back at his own blind two mornings later.
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