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I’ve seen this post from you before 3200 man. I’m pleased it has ended up in a thread of mine as well!

I completely agree with you. 465 gns is plenty for realistic distances. I’m just exploring an increased pellet count in the 2 5/8 hulls using #B shot for medium geese so that I can take an occasional 30 yard shot at a mallard or a wigeon. I shoot Greylag and Pinkfooted Geese in a local river valley so need my load optimized for that. About every 15-20 shots there will be a duck passing through so was just trying for a few more pellets. I’ve loaded a bunch of 465gn #B over 32 gns A-Steel and I’ll field test them over the next 5 months when the season starts over here in 2 weeks time. Roll crimping is not on my immediate skills to master list. It’ll come back around for me I’m sure…

GL
Try 1’s or 2’s

we kill large Canada geese routinely with 1450fps steel 2’s. Especially under 40yards.
 

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Loading 465 gr in a Straight-wall hull should satisfy your needs , there again , when we talk about Geese ,
the ones that weigh in around 8 to 10 lbs we need lots of pellet energy for shots inside of 40 yds !
I do like loading Air Gun bb's in 2 3/4" straight-wall hulls . The balance of a little less pellet count can be
better with more velocity ! I say this as I use a tighter choke to keep the patterns core together longer ,
it does take testing on the patterning board to adjust , powder and velocity !
I will say #1's in steel offer 109 pellets in a 465 gr load and with my IM (.025) choke I've had good
success with our Speckle Bellied geese ( 6 to 8 lb) with shots out past 40 yds but prefer over the
decoys mostly !
Pass-shooting Pinks at 90 ft to 105 ft #1's should be in your wheelhouse and very doable as
a 1400/1450 fps load does take a few more grs of powder ! But , I would shoot , what patterns Best !

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Try 1’s or 2’s

we kill large Canada geese routinely with 1450fps steel 2’s. Especially under 40yards.
Shot factory 3” 1 1/4oz 1s and 2s for the last 4 weeks of the season last year. Shot around 30 grey geese with them. Average weight of a greylag is at the top end of a speck weight range so they’re generally slightly bigger. Not Canadas by any stretch but there’re a few Canadas around this year.

I think any of the loads mentioned will be sufficient for the blame to be squarely with me. If I do my part then they’ll get the job done.

GL
 

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I have talked to several hunters over the years that hunt Pink foot Geese , some wanted heavy loads in 12 ga
while others were honest to goodness 10 ga shooters . The mighty 10 was the all out favorite but with tungsten
alloy shot , there's many options now ! Steel shot is the old standby and Bismuth does add a little more energy .
It's the HTL densities that shine the best , with added pattern density , the smaller size pellets carry a lot more
energy so they extend ones shooting distance "IF" your ability to hit the target is there ! Cost is always a factor
but there's very little difference loading HTL over Steel pellets . Surely it depends on "How many shells you
shoot in a season" along with how many birds you need to harvest ? The cost factor does equal out with
the performance these loads offer , mainly , there's less chasing crip's is my experience !
 

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Greylag -
what are you using to hold the RTO head? If using a handheld drill and hand holding the shell then things are unlikely to go well. Use a pillar/bench drill for the Gaep rto and position the shell head in a fixed cup/holder.
Your pictures suggest that you are putting too much down force on the RTO head before the plastic wall has sufficiently warmed up to form the rollover. Make sure the head has warmed up on an old hull before running a bunch through. Also use some lube eg vaseline. When the plastic case mouth is "ready" to fold over it requires little force to compress the foldover until firm resistance is met when contact made with OS card.
Last of all run that brass OTP head in a pillar drill to check that the shaft is true to the head - sometimes it is not a true perpendicular fit between shaft and head. How do I know that ?:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks for the detail on that. It’s in a drill press but with poor speed control. Held by hand on a rubber mat. It’s a work in progress and your advice is a great way forward for me. At the moment it’s our Goose/duck opener and I have some 465gn loads with food crimps from these hulls. RTO will definitely be in my future but I need to get out for some field work for a bit first…

GL
 

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The 2 stage technique makes a big difference. Sadly I’m going to have to get / make some sort of conditioner if roll crimping used, previously fold crimped hulls is my aim. I was trashing so many hills practicing that I cut the wrecked part off and rolled the untouched hull portion beneath. The result was good roll turn overs. I’m guessing a better RTO head might do it as well. Quite happy with the 465 gn load for fit and ease of loading. Just need to see if it will do the job.

Thanks for all the advice.

GL
I've never tried this myself, but it looks like it might work. Conditioning fold crimped hulls for roll crimping.

 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I’ve seen that before and maybe if I could get or make a spin doctor type hull reconditioner it might work for me. As it stands, the season is in full swing and I have a workable 465gn load with a cut down BP32/CSD118. I’ll revisit the roll crimping when I’ve got itchy feet next spring.
 
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